Why write by hand?

by MsConnie 41 replies
I've seen many of you tell newbies to learn to write copy by studying copy and practicing writing it by hand. What can you learn by writing copy by hand that you can't learn by typing it?

Just curious.
#copywriting #hand #write
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  • Profile picture of the author travlinguy
    I've seen many suggestions that people new to copywriting write out famous letters of others by hand. And that's because writing forces you to be more aware of what you're writing because you have to consciously think about it. And that enhances the learning process. And since these letters are supposedly great, the techniques sort of transfer.

    But I don't really see any benefit to writing your own original stuff that way.
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    • Profile picture of the author MsConnie
      Originally Posted by travlinguy View Post

      I've seen many suggestions that people new to copywriting write out famous letters of others by hand. And that's because writing forces you to be more aware of what you're writing because you have to consciously think about it. And that enhances the learning process. And since these letters are supposedly great, the techniques sort of transfer.

      But I don't really see any benefit to writing your own original stuff that way.
      It wasn't clear in my post, but the bolded is what I was referring to. Why the emphasis on writing out sales letters of other by hand?

      ETA: My question was answered by a couple of people while I was typing this post. Thanks to all who replied.
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      • Profile picture of the author courier91
        Originally Posted by MsConnie View Post

        It wasn't clear in my post, but the bolded is what I was referring to. Why the emphasis on writing out sales letters of other by hand?

        ETA: My question was answered by a couple of people while I was typing this post. Thanks to all who replied.
        I believe it's someone like absorbing someone's style. Mimicking someone else's personality, vocabulary, and overall writing style adds a little flavor to your own. Not quite sure if it's 100% fact, but I've read somewhere that Hunter S. Thompson used to rewrite segments of The Great Gatsby to improve his own writing.
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        • Profile picture of the author arfasaira
          Maybe it's just me, but the idea that writing out famous letters by hand repeatedly is going to make you a great copywriter is just as silly as someone saying they are a doctor because they've written out every medical text book by hand.

          How that can possibly make you a good copywriter without having the understanding behind WHY you write a particular way or the deeper reasons of what makes a sales letter work is NOT going to magically transfer to your brain.

          This is just silly and nonsensical to me.

          However, I have heard of people doing this and they swear by it, but me, I guess in that sense I am more traditional like that. I need to have a complete understanding behind the thoughts and processes before I can even put pen to paper.
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          • Profile picture of the author EricMN
            Originally Posted by arfasaira View Post

            Maybe it's just me, but the idea that writing out famous letters by hand repeatedly is going to make you a great copywriter is just as silly as someone saying they are a doctor because they've written out every medical text book by hand.

            How that can possibly make you a good copywriter without having the understanding behind WHY you write a particular way or the deeper reasons of what makes a sales letter work is NOT going to magically transfer to your brain.

            This is just silly and nonsensical to me.

            However, I have heard of people doing this and they swear by it, but me, I guess in that sense I am more traditional like that. I need to have a complete understanding behind the thoughts and processes before I can even put pen to paper.
            I very much agree.

            This tactic isn't just present for copy, it is also supported by some authors of fiction as well. . . But does it work?

            If used properly, yes. I think before someone shadows copy they should first read about the principles of copy and the theory/mechanisms that make it work. Once that's done, pick proven sales letters and analyze them: what did they use? how did they use it? etc. . .

            Once you do this, I think writing out the sales letter does the job of sitting you in the seat of it's author. You get a flavour for how they picked the words by being forced to write like them. It helps in realizing why they chose every letter and why they structured every sentence, paragraph and heading the way they did.

            As a stand alone, it likely won't allow you to write good copy. As a supplementary tool in the process of better understand and producing copy? Well, I think that's where it's not such a bad idea.
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          • Profile picture of the author Rezbi
            Originally Posted by arfasaira View Post

            Maybe it's just me, but the idea that writing out famous letters by hand repeatedly is going to make you a great copywriter is just as silly as someone saying they are a doctor because they've written out every medical text book by hand.

            How that can possibly make you a good copywriter without having the understanding behind WHY you write a particular way or the deeper reasons of what makes a sales letter work is NOT going to magically transfer to your brain.

            This is just silly and nonsensical to me.

            However, I have heard of people doing this and they swear by it, but me, I guess in that sense I am more traditional like that. I need to have a complete understanding behind the thoughts and processes before I can even put pen to paper.
            This is where some are going wrong. And I think it's usually people who have no idea about copywriting who are to blame.

            They probably see what Gary Halbert said about copying out by hand, but haven't bothered to look at his other stuff where he says study the basics and learn the rules first.
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  • Profile picture of the author sanjaypande
    Originally Posted by MsConnie View Post

    I've seen many of you tell newbies to learn to write copy by studying copy and practicing writing it by hand. What can you learn by writing copy by hand that you can't learn by typing it?

    Just curious.
    I think it's more of an "old school wisdom" thing that went unchallenged. Then again is it?

    Having tried both, I do see benefits of just typing it out as well but tend to get distracted with formatting and stuff whereas with writing by hand you end up focusing a little more (And that could be just me).

    As a side effect, you'll have more handwriting practice and less risk to suffer from Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    Jokes aside writing by hand gives your mind a certain freedom after a while and that is exactly when the writing starts to take off. It usually happens on the 3rd page.

    Just start writing anything (seriously anything ... even blah blah blah) and notice when you get to the 3rd page your momentum just changes, your mind shifts into a different dimension and your pencil (or pen) is trying hard to catch up with the thoughts your brain is outputting at a rapid pace (Maybe it's just me again).

    The reasons could be neurological. Writing causes memorization and the brain starts absorbing and then recognizing the patterns. Writing is more sub-conscious than typing I think.

    Ok, I'm rambling now. sorry.
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    • Profile picture of the author Winleet
      Originally Posted by sanjaypande View Post

      I think it's more of an "old school wisdom" thing that went unchallenged. Then again is it?

      Having tried both, I do see benefits of just typing it out as well but tend to get distracted with formatting and stuff whereas with writing by hand you end up focusing a little more (And that could be just me).

      As a side effect, you'll have more handwriting practice and less risk to suffer from Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

      Jokes aside writing by hand gives your mind a certain freedom after a while and that is exactly when the writing starts to take off. It usually happens on the 3rd page.

      Just start writing anything (seriously anything ... even blah blah blah) and notice when you get to the 3rd page your momentum just changes, your mind shifts into a different dimension and your pencil (or pen) is trying hard to catch up with the thoughts your brain is outputting at a rapid pace (Maybe it's just me again).

      The reasons could be neurological. Writing causes memorization and the brain starts absorbing and then recognizing the patterns. Writing is more sub-conscious than typing I think.

      Ok, I'm rambling now. sorry.
      Thanks! I'll try just writing my thoughts until I get something good now.
      Will test if writing anything will get your mind going lol.
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  • Profile picture of the author guynextdoor
    It is forcing you more to know the full phrase before you write it down instead pressing the delete button 10 times.

    Exercise imagination.
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  • Profile picture of the author EricMN
    Writing out by hand is more actively engaging than typing. Then, when you analyze, you can scribble, jot and write all over what you just wrote in whatever way helps you best to learn.

    Studies also show being able to even hold a piece of paper increases retention of the material as opposed to reading it off the screen. Simply the act of holding your copy and flipping pages can help consolidate the information so that you can analyze and understand it better. The effect is so profound that if you are reading something that someone flips the pages for you, your ability to recall that information decreases from what it would if you flipped them yourself.

    Weird stuff. It's reasonable to assume it's the same for the actual writing of the piece as well.
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    • Profile picture of the author Joao
      As it is my first post i'll be nice and give this one away

      This one was teached early by my mentor.

      The reason why you should write by hand is because another part of your brain is trigered, the creative part.

      In school before you first know how to read, they teach you to design letters, the design part activates de creative part of your brain, and that conection stays forever inside of you.

      Wen you type on a keyboard you are not designing, so your brain is on a diferent mode. With train this can be overcome .

      Btw i'm a Portuguese copy, if you want to get bad ass at copy you must learn Portuguese as it is the hardest for copy .

      Ex: In Portuguese the "dear" word (ok dear is cut of now and it will go to spam ) does has a Masculine and Femine conjugation, try to do a autoresponder sales letter on that

      Regards!

      João
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      • Profile picture of the author EricMN
        Originally Posted by Joao View Post

        As it is my first post i'll be nice and give this one away

        This one was teached early by my mentor.

        The reason why you should write by hand is because another part of your brain is trigered, the creative part.

        In school before you first know how to read, they teach you to design letters, the design part activates de creative part of your brain, and that conection stays forever inside of you.

        Wen you type on a keyboard you are not designing, so your brain is on a diferent mode. With train this can be overcome .

        Btw i'm a Portuguese copy, if you want to get bad ass at copy you must learn Portuguese as it is the hardest for copy .

        Ex: In Portuguese the "dear" word (ok dear is cut of now and it will go to spam ) does has a Masculine and Femine conjugation, try to do a autoresponder sales letter on that

        Regards!

        João
        I'd be inclined to believe this if it didn't suggest that typing and creativity are mutually exclusive.

        Also, welcome to WF!
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        • Profile picture of the author hardraysnight
          My foot and/in mouth are otherwise engaged
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        • Profile picture of the author Joao
          Originally Posted by EricMN View Post

          I'd be inclined to believe this if it didn't suggest that typing and creativity are mutually exclusive.

          Also, welcome to WF!
          They are not , but think about it and wen you have a chance ask someone from the "brain" area, he´ll explain better then me, there is a conection it's not "old school wisdom"

          J
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  • Profile picture of the author shawoon98
    I strongly believe it's whatever you are comfortable with. Writing or Typing. In my case I'm always distracted by the curiousity of searching something on google whenever I'm typing something. But whenever I'm out of computer and writing on paper, I can fully concentrate. And that gives me better result.
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  • Profile picture of the author Cam Connor
    Originally Posted by MsConnie View Post

    I've seen many of you tell newbies to learn to write copy by studying copy and practicing writing it by hand. What can you learn by writing copy by hand that you can't learn by typing it?

    Just curious.
    Personally, I believe in taking advantage of this great technological device known as the computer... why go back in time?
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  • Profile picture of the author Rach72
    Although I love my computer I do find that when writign by hand you don't get those annoying little red and green squiggles under all the mis-spelled and grammaticly incorrect words and phrases that tens to distarct and disturb the creative flow

    (do I need to edit? )
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    • Profile picture of the author Cam Connor
      Originally Posted by Rach72 View Post

      Although I love my computer I do find that when writign by hand you don't get those annoying little red and green squiggles under all the mis-spelled and grammaticly incorrect words and phrases that tens to distarct and disturb the creative flow

      (do I need to edit? )
      I think there's a way to shut that off in Word, I forget how to do it.

      Edit: OK, I found it, it's Tools, Spelling & Grammar, Options, Uncheck "Check Spelling as You Type" and "Check Grammar as You Type"
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      • Profile picture of the author hardraysnight
        Originally Posted by Cam Connor View Post

        I think there's a way to shut that off in Word, I forget how to do it.

        Edit: OK, I found it, it's Tools, Spelling & Grammar, Options, Uncheck "Check Spelling as You Type" and "Check Grammar as You Type"
        Esaier wya. od nto maek misstakes
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  • Profile picture of the author AmandaT
    When you write you tend to focus more word per word. Typing, normally, requires less thought into the words you are typing. Also, there have been many studies showing that the brain absorbs information better when writing it than typing it.

    Personally, I do both because my hand gets pretty tired after writing out a whole sale's letter, but I find that I get a lot more out of writing them by hand. Writing is also slower than typing for most people and gives you more time looking over the letter.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rach72
    I think there's a way to shut that off in Word, I forget how to do it.

    Edit: OK, I found it, it's Tools, Spelling & Grammar, Options, Uncheck "Check Spelling as You Type" and "Check Grammar as You Type"
    Lol - thanks! I have managed to train myself to ignore it until I have finished my article - then I can tweak to my hearts desire!

    Handwriting allows you to release initial emotions as well.

    When I am worked up about something I will always hand-write the main points that I want to say. But if I were to send it like that I would undoubtedly burn a lot of bridges, so typing allows me to 'tone it down' to an acceptable level and get my point across far more effectively.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jake Gray
    I guess it is more of a personal preference.

    If I were to take notes, I tend to type them up and print them.

    If I were to write copy, I tend to type it in Word or Notepad.

    So yeah, I guess it is personal preference or convenience.
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  • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
    Originally Posted by MsConnie View Post

    I've seen many of you tell newbies to learn to write copy by studying copy and practicing writing it by hand. What can you learn by writing copy by hand that you can't learn by typing it?

    Just curious.
    Really good question. I wasn't sold when I first heard it either Connie.

    But it works. I wrote this article on why (no sales pitch, promise lol)


    Can Copywriting Make You a Better Person? | Cashflow Copywriter
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  • Profile picture of the author esaucans
    I agree with the other warriors said. Nice reminder to all of us here.
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  • Profile picture of the author MissLauraCatella
    The idea of writing good letters by hand comes from the thinking that you'll physically (and intimately) develop the flow, pacing and structure of good writing.

    The thing with that now, for me, is that I've always written on the computer.

    So the way I type is the way I flow, in essence! I've considered typing out some of my favorite letters, but have yet to find the time.
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  • Profile picture of the author Pusateri
    Copying a great piece of writing by hand is a symphony of learning.

    First, it's the most attentive way of reading there is. But, it goes deeper than that.

    Your brain is not a single organ, but a collection of systems that act like players in an orchestra. The conductor stands about two inches back of your left ear. It's the left occipitotemporal area and is sometimes called the brain's letterbox.

    It deciphers the letters, then raises its batton and sets the other orchestra members playing. Graphemes become phonemes, memory is probed and meaning is revealed. But all that stuff happens any time you read, not just hand copying.

    The magic behind hand copying is in how slow it is. All the members of your neuro-orchestra process what is before your eye in milliseconds. While your hand is slowly copying, they begin bouncing that word/sentence back and forth...looking for and making new connections, searching for and recognizing paterns, analyzing word choice and placement, devining the structure of the piece as it is slowly revealed.

    Also, you subvocalize when you read. You supply a voice in your head to speak the words on the page. You give an imagined voice to the writer that fits your interpretation of the style and tone of the writing. Subvocalization is important for memory. It means what you read is stored not in your relatively poor visual memory, but in your high fidelity auditory memory. You remember the sounds of the words, not how they looked individually on the page.

    Here's how I think this applies to hand copying, and this is just my own theory, so take it with a grain of salt: I think when you hand copy a piece of writing, you subvocalize in your own voice. The words, methods and structure become your own. If true, it's the closest you can get to being in the writer's head.
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  • Profile picture of the author annabelle07
    I don't quite understand why newbies are asked to copy by hand famous sales letters without being taught the reasons as to why they're famous sales letters etc. However, while writing short copy in particular (catchy headlines and stuff) ;I can definitely understand how writing it down makes a difference. For some reason (not sure why) it's just more stimulating than seeing it on a comp screen.
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    • Profile picture of the author Rezbi
      Originally Posted by annabelle07 View Post

      I don't quite understand why newbies are asked to copy by hand famous sales letters without being taught the reasons as to why they're famous sales letters etc. However, while writing short copy in particular (catchy headlines and stuff) ;I can definitely understand how writing it down makes a difference. For some reason (not sure why) it's just more stimulating than seeing it on a comp screen.
      If anyone says you can learn just by copying out ads, then they're going about it the wrong way.

      You need to learn the rules of copywriting first. Otherwise you'll have no idea why something works.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rezbi
    I went into why I think this works here: How To Become A Copywriter In The Shortest Possible Time | Direct Marketing Advantage

    It may not be everybody's cup-o-tea, but it doesn't mean it doesn't work.

    If everyone was the same, we wouldn't need so many different ways of learning.

    Copying out great sales copy worked for me.

    In fact, when I find myself stuck getting started, I can make a start by copying something and then my own writing flows.

    To assume something is useless just because you can't make it work is a little conceited IMO.
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  • Profile picture of the author gjabiz
    Originally Posted by MsConnie View Post

    I've seen many of you tell newbies to learn to write copy by studying copy and practicing writing it by hand. What can you learn by writing copy by hand that you can't learn by typing it?

    Just curious.
    For the few of you that were just beginning to think I knew what I was talking about...this should quickly change your minds...he..he.

    MsConnie,

    I will tell you the reason for writing copy by hand and what to do with it once you have written it out in your own handwriting...as told to me by Sir Gary Halbert.

    But first, I have to go back a couple of decades, and, YIKES, give a brief EDUCATION on the subject of...

    ideomotor effect...

    WTF??? I've never heard of that...sez you.

    YES you have...Ouija boards, dowsing, automatic writing, pendulum pheonomen...

    Are all areas that make use of ideomotor effect.

    NOW, I studied the subject for two years while writing copy for people who were involved in the business of selling ideomotor "techniques and devices"...so a few paragraphs won't suffice...but it'll have to do.

    It has long been discredited as a way to get subconsious thoughts to come out...and many good papers are out there...Quackwatch has some good work on the subject...

    that being said...

    ideomotor physiology is a real thing...the unconscious twitching of muscles in your fingers is what causes the Ouija to fly, the pendulum to swing, the pen to write automatically...

    AND the thinking before the debunking was...it was a way to access subconscious thought...and the other side of the coin was that by using a pen and writing and keeping the conscious mind occupied, it was, in effect, a direct shortcut to your brain allowing you to bypass the RAS and implant, install or just inject knowledge directly into the gray matter.

    OK. That's the theory behind it. Now for Gary and his REASON WHY and HOW to do it.

    You want to speak out loud while writing. This occupies your conscious mind and keeps it focused so you are not thinking about which hamburger stand to go to at lunch time.

    When you are done writing you want to read aloud what you have just written...I record it, and still use a cassette, even though I have several digital recorders...a cassette is harder to erase, it takes a conscious effort...

    Then, you want to find at least TWO other people to read the promotion and record them reading it.

    This is where the AMAZING part comes and the part that could actually make you a better copywriter...so pay attention to this:

    when you listen to the way you read it and the way other people read it...you will INSTANTLY discover the stumbling blocks. The rough parts. The parts which slow the reader down...

    Remember this: Cadence, pace, beat.

    Friends, Romans and Countrymen...lend me your ear.

    Aristotle knew it. Shakespeare. OBAMA knows it. Toastmasters teach it...and Sir Gary Halbert made a fortune with it...it being

    the LAW of Threes.

    Cadence.
    Pace.
    Beat.

    Go to some Halbert promotions and read them out loud. RECORD yourself reading them...you will quickly and easily hear and feel the law of threes...and get a better understanding of some of the secrets of persuasion...used by orators, copywriters and would be world Kings...

    Cadence.
    Pace.
    Beat.

    It is about RHYTHM. All great copywriters discover their own rhythm, their own voice and their own writing style before they go onto greatness.

    Almost all follow the rules of Cadence. Pace. Beat.

    The reason you want to write out winners by hand...THEN READ THEM ALOUD and get other people to read them aloud is...

    so that you can HEAR...

    understand

    incorporate

    the Cadence. Pace. Beat of the promotion and how persuasive the law of threes can be.

    IF, you don't believe the skeptics and scientists...it could also be a way for you to use reverse ideomotor effect and get instant installation of technique into your brain cells.

    But, I could be wrong.
    And maybe Gary was too.

    But I doubt it.

    Write.
    Read.
    Listen.

    YOU MsConnie will be amazed, elucidated and thrilled with the results.

    gjabiz

    PS. I've written several promotions for people who believe in what they sell, even though I may not personally believe in it...I try not to prejudice myself as a copywriter...and keep an open mind as to what the person is trying to do...

    I'm of the OPINION and belief that drinking beer is NOT a good way to get healthy and get a six pack ab...if someone else thinks it is...and the market accepts their presentation...who am I to say?

    Which opens up a whole nuther can of worms...copywriter morality...maybe another day.
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    • Profile picture of the author Rezbi
      Originally Posted by gjabiz View Post

      When you are done writing you want to read aloud what you have just written...I record it, and still use a cassette, even though I have several digital recorders...a cassette is harder to erase, it takes a conscious effort...

      Then, you want to find at least TWO other people to read the promotion and record them reading it.

      This is where the AMAZING part comes and the part that could actually make you a better copywriter...so pay attention to this:

      when you listen to the way you read it and the way other people read it...you will INSTANTLY discover the stumbling blocks. The rough parts. The parts which slow the reader down...

      ... The reason you want to write out winners by hand...THEN READ THEM ALOUD and get other people to read them aloud is...

      so that you can HEAR...

      understand

      incorporate

      the Cadence. Pace. Beat of the promotion and how persuasive the law of threes can be.
      Aha!

      So there is a reason why my method worked.

      I knew there must have been a reason for the madness:
      How To Become A Copywriter In The Shortest Possible Time | Direct Marketing Advantage
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  • Profile picture of the author yecall
    It certainly will make everything take longer. Speed is important so many times and we have to keep our turnaround time up. For me, it was kind of hard to get used to always writing everything on a computer because I was used to always writing in my journals, etc. It takes time.
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  • Profile picture of the author KevinBolty
    I write by hand because COMPUTER DON'T LET ME FOCUS.

    And also i 'feel' more of what im writing!
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  • Profile picture of the author Daniel Sanchez
    Because technology makes us stupider:

    Handwriting, not typing, makes kids better learners
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  • When I started in stand-up lo so many years ago we would write out Carson's monologues (for the kids, Johnny Carson was a guy that had Leno's job, aw never mind) and other comic's routines. It really helps internalize the structure of great material.

    Now I just write out Carrot Top routines, "Ever see this sign? It says KEEP OFF MEDIAN. You're doing 70 miles per hour they tell you KEEP OFF MEDIAN. You know, honey, this smooth stuff sucks, want to cut the grass? BRRRRRRRRRRR. Go Daddy! BRRRRRRRRRR. That's like putting up a sign that says KEEP ON BRIDGE!"

    Oy.
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  • Profile picture of the author avalanche
    I'll buy the different parts of the brain, but still wonder if in let's say 20 years when most of the copywriters will have grown up on the computer if the advice will still be the same... and if overall copywriting creativity suffers. My guess is "no".
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    • Profile picture of the author MLDerk
      I've tried writing by hand. But I have to go painfully slow if I want to be able to read it when I've finished, and I get writer's cramp very easily. And I just don't have time to go THAT slow very often!!

      So I've resorted to typing almost all of the time. An ergonomic keyboard and mouse have cleared up past tendencies to get carpel tunnel and tennis elbow. When I do these kinds of exercises, I speak it as I type it. I try to speak as if I were reading it to an audience. Sometimes I spell the words as I type each letter (this ruins the "reading to an audience" part, however).

      I don't know if all the correct parts of my brain are being engaged or not, but this seems to work best for me. But maybe this is why I am not a copywriter, but a researcher for copywriters! :rolleyes:
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      • Profile picture of the author BrianMcLeod
        Originally Posted by MLDerk View Post

        maybe this is why I am not a copywriter, but a researcher for copywriters! :rolleyes:
        Interesting... I think it was YOU who sent me a great direct mail piece in a brown paper bag recently, wasn't it?

        The letter was promoting research services for copywriters and I liked it so much I did a whole segment on that letter on one of my shows recently - pointing out the clever paper bag envelope and highly targeted benefits used in the letter...

        A) Was that you, Ms. Derk?

        and if so...

        B) Did you write that letter?

        Best,

        Brian
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  • Profile picture of the author Joe Benjamin
    If my opinion makes any difference...

    I've made a few thousand because I started off
    writing proven sales copy by hand. As a result...

    Email copy = improved.

    Article Writing = improved.

    Copywriting = improved.

    Talking On The Phone Making Sales = improved.

    Why?

    From personal experience, as you're writing out
    copy by hand, you understand *flow*, *cadence*
    and *beat* (gjabiz - awesome analogy).

    ...somehow...some way...you just *get it*.

    It won't happen after one piece of copy. It won't
    happen after two. But maybe 5 or 10 (or more).

    When it *does*, it clicks.

    Structure. Placement. Use of words. And, Human
    Behavior becomes crystal clear. And...

    it's not something you can get studying reasons
    WHY behind copy. Although it is important - but
    KNOWING the reason behind a strong guarantee,
    a eye-catching opener, or solid closer - doesn't
    come CLOSE to WRITING it out by hand.

    ...and I'm not talking about *typing it out*.

    There's something about manually putting a pen
    to paper that gives it power. No need for me to
    scientifically or psychology explain why - i's been
    done in previous posts.

    ...you know, it reminds of facebook.

    No matter how badly people try to replace human
    -to-human interaction...

    it will NEVER replace the feelings, emotion, and
    overall satisfaction of hearing a persons voice,
    touching that person, or looking them dead in the
    eye.

    So, without regurgitating what Gary Halbert said
    to defend a legend, I've actually *done* what he
    recommended - and will be doing it again before I
    write my next piece - because it always works &
    get's my creativity juices going.

    In other words, I recommend it because it works.

    Those who argue AGAINST it...I doubt have ever
    tried it.
    Signature
    **How I FLIPPED $80 into $690 Pure Profit With ONE EASY Method...2 to 3x Per Week...Only 30 Minutes Per Day (and how YOU can COPY my RESULTS, too!) **CLICK HERE FOR VERIFIED VIDEO PROOF**
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