Selecting the product

by georgeg_g 98 replies
Using CB and so far i've been choosing products to promote that had low popularity ,thinking that competition will be less rough.
But lately am not sure,cause if you exclude the avrg-sale, commission,refrd etc
they dont really matter as much as popularity and gravity,which shows the potential earnings you could make but also the competition.

Which criteria do you use for product selection?
#main internet marketing discussion forum #product #selecting
  • Profile picture of the author patrickmorgan
    How do you promote? To what niche? First, find a hungry market and find out their need, want or urge. Then you'll know what product to sell them
    Signature

    ATTENTION: This video will change your life!: http://bit.ly/bwTQIs

  • Profile picture of the author ed2010
    Banned
    [DELETED]
  • Profile picture of the author tyroneshum
    Before choosing a product, you should have started with keyword research because from there, you'll eventually get an idea whether it's a hungry market needing promoters or not. Afterward, you could head off to Clickbank to find ideas in creating your own product.
    Signature
    outsourcinglive.com
    Follow me on my 90 Day Challenge to rank no. 1 on Google
    ---------------------------------------------------
    Connect with me at: outsourcinglive.com/google-plus
  • Profile picture of the author georgeg_g
    I see.
    Ok,now lets forget niches and hungry markets and keywords for a while.
    So,there are dozens of products of different niches,you choose one niche and that specific has 5-10 products,which one do you chose to promote?
    Only by the stats the product has (ave/sale,refrd,comsion etc).
    • Profile picture of the author scrofford
      Originally Posted by georgeg_g View Post

      I see.
      Ok,now lets forget niches and hungry markets and keywords for a while.
      So,there are dozens of products of different niches,you choose one niche and that specific has 5-10 products,which one do you chose to promote?
      Only by the stats the product has (ave/sale,refrd,comsion etc).
      How do you think you can make money if you forget about the niches and hungry markets? Who cares about the product if nobody wants to buy it? You have to find a market that has people who want to buy the stuff you are promoting.

      Find a hungry market FIRST then find the product whether that be creating it yourself or being an affiliate. Done any other way and you are going to flop on your face and continuously be frustrated.
  • Profile picture of the author secrets2010
    Originally Posted by georgeg_g View Post

    Using CB and so far i've been choosing products to promote that had low popularity ,thinking that competition will be less rough.
    But lately am not sure,cause if you exclude the avrg-sale, commission,refrd etc
    they dont really matter as much as popularity and gravity,which shows the potential earnings you could make but also the competition.

    Which criteria do you use for product selection?
    I choose the products that pay the highest comission, the produtcs that has a good sales page, the products that will help my subscribers...I don't choose products that wont help my subscribers and that don't offer the value that you pay for...why? because my buyers will not buy again if they feel scammed...

    i don't take into consideration popularity/gravity because the more popular is the product the less chances i have i will be the first in presenting the product to the subscribers...chances are that my subscribers already know about the product...
  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    Originally Posted by georgeg_g View Post

    Using CB
    Originally Posted by georgeg_g View Post

    Which criteria do you use for product selection?
    Good question: I think CB product selection's probably the single area where most affiliates make mistakes that are most expensive in terms of opportunity-cost.

    Here's my own 10-point checklist for CB product-selection (and these are more or less the order in which I look at them, too, I think):-

    1. Has to be a niche in which the prospective customers are not already Clickbank affiliates themselves (obviously! - otherwise how can you possibly ever earn an affiliate commission on a sale to them?!) - so for me that completely excludes the "IM advice" and "make money online" niches.

    2. No leaks on the sales page: (no opt-in, no "free trial", no "contact the vendor here" etc.)

    3. No ridiculous hype or deceptive tactics on the sales page (nothing obviously non-FTC-compliant, no phony urgency/scarcity, nothing clearly deceptive/dishonest, no credibility-losing claims, no income-claims, no cancer-curing claims, no deceptive crap about "as seen on Yahoo/MSN" which people will rightly ridicule!).

    4. No pop-ups/discounts.

    5. Gravity not too high (over 30 puts me off a bit; over 60 puts me off a bit more; over 100 I won't consider at the moment).

    6. Sales-page looks to me as if it will convert my traffic well (obviously subjective and not entirely reliable, but as a copywriter I like to think I can guess pretty well, and I can tell whether it's "professional copy" or "home-made copy" - and I don't care about anyone else's traffic so "overall conversion rates" aren't relevant to me, not that they're available anyway).

    7. Good product (I don't promote anything without seeing and assessing it myself, obviously)

    8. Good vendor reputation/attitude/behaviour (I'll contact them first, one way or another, and if I don't get a reply I won't promote their product, because I can imagine what their after-sales behaviour will be like if they won't even reply to a prospective business associate).

    9. Reasonably high earnings per sale (75% of small amount, 60% of medium amount, 50% of larger amount etc.) - I slightly prefer more expensive products around $100 when I can find them, because I think they're easier for me to sell than cheaper ones (really).

    10. Has to be something I can write about (I'm an article marketer) - for me, that probably excludes anything terribly technical or for which I'll have to go to night school to understand the vocabulary.

    The things I don't really care about, though I recognise that some affiliates do, which are therefore not on my list at all, are (i) "% rfd", and (ii) affiliate gimmicks (banners/articles etc) offered by the vendor, which I'm probably not going to use anyway. I strongly suspect that almost no professional affiliate has much interest in "marketing tools" provided by the vendor or really takes this into account in product-selection.

    In my first 4 or 5 months as a Clickbank affiliate, I earned very, very little. The two things that made a huge and dramatic difference to my income were (a) not touching anything with a vendor's opt-in on the sales-page, and (b) staying well away from high gravity products. I changed just those two things and quite quickly I was really making a living, and have been ever since.
    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
      Originally Posted by John McEachern View Post

      Why does a gravity over 30 put you off? You think the competition is already to stiff?
      Not necessarily, and I wouldn't hesitate to promote a product with a gravity of 45 or so if everything else was right about it, for me. But I can't avoid noticing a real inverse correlation (especially when including all the dreadful things I initially tried to promote when I started, having absolutely no idea what I was doing at all) between gravity-figures and my own sales-numbers. And I'm talking about well over 20 products altogether, which just feels like too many to be a coincidence.

      I remember commenting here about 4 or 5 months ago that my two best-selling and easiest-selling products by far both have single-figure gravities, and that's still true now.

      It took me a long time to learn and understand that there's no correlation at all between gravity and numbers of sales. I started off making all the same mistaken assumptions that everyone does, imagining that if a product has a higher gravity, this simply must be some sort of evidence that it "must be selling well". And of course it doesn't help that so many "guidebooks" and "e-courses" and even WSO's misinform people about this very point. The reality is very counter-intuitive, after all. :rolleyes:
    • Profile picture of the author rvrabel2002
      6. Sales-page looks to me as if it will convert my traffic well (obviously subjective and not entirely reliable, but as a copywriter I like to think I can guess pretty well, and I can tell whether it's "professional copy" or "home-made copy" - and I don't care about anyone else's traffic so "overall conversion rates" aren't relevant to me, not that they're available anyway).


      Wish I would have seen this thread this time last year. Would have saved me alot of frustration. I would say I probably went against every rule you followed here, and never made a dime. Now I know why...

      Quick Question about the statement above, how do you tell the difference between "professional copy" and "home-made copy"? What sorts of things do you look for? Everything else in your 10 points is obvious in and of itself, but this part I can't grasp.

      Also, do you ever direct link to an offer? Or do you send them to a review page first? Im guessing you do reviews to "warm up" the potential customer, but how do you think the conversion rates compare?

      Not even sure if your still following this thread, but i figured i would give it a shot.

      Rob
      Signature

    • Profile picture of the author Bruce NewMedia
      Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

      6. Sales-page looks to me as if it will convert my traffic well (obviously subjective and not entirely reliable, but as a copywriter I like to think I can guess pretty well, and I can tell whether it's "professional copy" or "home-made copy" - and I don't care about anyone else's traffic so "overall conversion rates" aren't relevant to me, not that they're available anyway).

      7. Good product (I don't promote anything without seeing and assessing it myself, obviously)
      Alexa, I like your checklist alot. Thanks for sharing it.

      Numbers 6 and 7 are particularly important to me. How the sales page looks can make all the difference, of course. I find many CB pages to either be way too 'slick' or so amateurish that they can't be read without snoring. Hitting the 'sweet spot' in sales page copywriting is hard, and most on CB don't come close.

      Also, buying the product and seeking a little support tells me a bunch about whether there's any 'there' there. I've sent an email after purchase and waited a week for an answer....now why would I want to promote that?
      _____
      Bruce
    • Profile picture of the author jafris
      Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

      7. Good product (I don't promote anything without seeing and assessing it myself, obviously)

      8. Good vendor reputation/attitude/behaviour (I'll contact them first, one way or another, and if I don't get a reply I won't promote their product, because I can imagine what their after-sales behaviour will be like if they won't even reply to a prospective business associate).
      Hi Alexa,

      that's a complete paradigm shift from what I have been taught; that is, minimum gravity should be 100?

      For readers sake, would you like to post some links of the products that you have selected. A one or two could be taken as benchmarks for of us.

      Thanks & Regards
    • Profile picture of the author Ngwu Ogonnaya Precious
      Banned
      [DELETED]
    • Profile picture of the author JDE
      Alexa, thank you VERY MUCH for your 10-point checklist for CB product-selection. It has really helped me to focus on products that will convert, and stay away from the IM niche, which I learned a long time ago to stay away from. There is so much cr-- on Clickbank. Sure you may sell a lot of IM programs, but one may also spend a ton of $$ getting traffic to it, only to slip further into the red as the massive refunds start to pour in.

      Would really appreciate anyone else's additions to Alexa's list.

      Thanks
    • Profile picture of the author malaika
      Now I know why I never made any significant amounts of money with clickbank. Let me go at it again. Will post a review of my attempts here after 3 months.
    • Profile picture of the author yours2u
      Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

      In my first 4 or 5 months as a Clickbank affiliate, I earned very, very little. The two things that made a huge and dramatic difference to my income were (a) not touching anything with a vendor's opt-in on the sales-page, and (b) staying well away from high gravity products.
      That's my theory in a nutshell. Excellent list and comment - thanks
      Signature
      How many IM's to change a light bulb?
      Add your answer - this must be solved!
    • Profile picture of the author debmanks
      Hi there,
      you say in your post that you will alway check a product out before opting to promote it. So presumably you buy it. You must end up buying and getting refunds on loads of products through Clickbank. Don't they mind if you JUST CHECK THINGS OUT?
      Deb
    • Profile picture of the author Chuxy
      Hi Alexa this is very informative. Do you also check the the monthly global/local searches on Google before promoting a product. If you do what sort of volume would you consider to be potentially profitable.

      kindest regards,

      Chuxy

      Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

      Good question: I think CB product selection's probably the single area where most affiliates make mistakes that are most expensive in terms of opportunity-cost.

      Here's my own 10-point checklist for CB product-selection (and these are more or less the order in which I look at them, too, I think):-

      1. Has to be a niche in which the prospective customers are not already Clickbank affiliates themselves (obviously! - otherwise how can you possibly ever earn an affiliate commission on a sale to them?!) - so for me that completely excludes the "IM advice" and "make money online" niches.

      2. No leaks on the sales page: (no opt-in, no "free trial", no "contact the vendor here" etc.)

      3. No ridiculous hype or deceptive tactics on the sales page (nothing obviously non-FTC-compliant, no phony urgency/scarcity, nothing clearly deceptive/dishonest, no credibility-losing claims, no income-claims, no cancer-curing claims, no deceptive crap about "as seen on Yahoo/MSN" which people will rightly ridicule!).

      4. No pop-ups/discounts.

      5. Gravity not too high (over 30 puts me off a bit; over 60 puts me off a bit more; over 100 I won't consider at the moment).

      6. Sales-page looks to me as if it will convert my traffic well (obviously subjective and not entirely reliable, but as a copywriter I like to think I can guess pretty well, and I can tell whether it's "professional copy" or "home-made copy" - and I don't care about anyone else's traffic so "overall conversion rates" aren't relevant to me, not that they're available anyway).

      7. Good product (I don't promote anything without seeing and assessing it myself, obviously)

      8. Good vendor reputation/attitude/behaviour (I'll contact them first, one way or another, and if I don't get a reply I won't promote their product, because I can imagine what their after-sales behaviour will be like if they won't even reply to a prospective business associate).

      9. Reasonably high earnings per sale (75% of small amount, 60% of medium amount, 50% of larger amount etc.) - I slightly prefer more expensive products around $100 when I can find them, because I think they're easier for me to sell than cheaper ones (really).

      10. Has to be something I can write about (I'm an article marketer) - for me, that probably excludes anything terribly technical or for which I'll have to go to night school to understand the vocabulary.

      The things I don't really care about, though I recognise that some affiliates do, which are therefore not on my list at all, are (i) "% rfd", and (ii) affiliate gimmicks (banners/articles etc) offered by the vendor, which I'm probably not going to use anyway. I strongly suspect that almost no professional affiliate has much interest in "marketing tools" provided by the vendor or really takes this into account in product-selection.

      In my first 4 or 5 months as a Clickbank affiliate, I earned very, very little. The two things that made a huge and dramatic difference to my income were (a) not touching anything with a vendor's opt-in on the sales-page, and (b) staying well away from high gravity products. I changed just those two things and quite quickly I was really making a living, and have been ever since.
  • Profile picture of the author Dietriffic
    Alexa, that is very enlightening.
    Signature

    — Melanie (RD)

    Weight loss/fitness marketers earn 75% per sale with... The Fat Reversal Formula
    Join me: Twitter and Facebook

    • Profile picture of the author georgeg_g
      Wow alexa thats a post that exceeded my expectations
      Big thanks <3
  • Profile picture of the author Capricorn
    Thank you Alexa for sharing so much valuable info. I've been on Clickbank & tried to promote some of the products a few months ago and have virtually done exact opposite of your 10 steps process - because I was told to do so aaahhh...Esp. in terms of the gravity (always use high gravity as a selector!) LOL. Now I know why nothing ever converted.

    Since then I've moved to CPA and am just starting out, but one thing that I have found is that your 10 steps process relates very much to CPA offer sales pages. So many thanks for posting it :-)
    Signature

    whoops - used my affiliated link to maxbounty & just read the rules so have removed :-) - have no website yet so am just typing in this stuff to fill in the space ;-)))

  • Profile picture of the author arnold55
    I go to the vendor spotlight and see how many others are subscribing. If there is only one or two I go to another product in the chosen market. In my opinion (in most cases) the more subscribers the better. The second thing I do is look for an affiliate page. This makes my job a lot easier. If it is a well promoted product the vendor will have email letters, articles and other useful tools.

    george michaels
    "arnold55"
  • Profile picture of the author willoh
    Whoa Alexa, that list puts things in a whole new perspective! Thx for sharing
    Signature

Trending Topics