Impressions; clicks on the ad(s) but no conversions - here's what to do

4 replies
Only on a few occasions you get to see conversions right out of the gate so a little disconnection with money (you think you're losing) would help keep the spirits up 'cos after sticking it out- you could get your a** handed to you if you're not experienced!
So the traffic sequence is...the ad à the lander à the offer's sales page...Or if you're direct linking - the ad àoffer's sales page


Problem Arising!!


Scenario 1: the ad's garnering clicks but you see no conversions.
Like in "RunMarty's" case in his post "No Conversions, Now What" - his post actually inspires this one you're reading.
His ads garnered 300 clicks but brought no conversions...
If this is your case then you've got yourself a "clicker" ad - Yes; all they do is garner clicks, there's also a "converter" ad, they bring in conversions and lastly what I like to call Kaput ads - they just don't work.
When all you've got is a clicker ad(s), a high bounce rate on your lander is usually the problem... (in RunMarty case 300 people came to the offer's salespage through the ad and figured it wasn't worth their time)
Going deeper...see the image below, it says Free Beer, right? Not! What it really says is Free wifi-cold Beer. This can be tricky especially when people spot it on a hot sunny day from afar!






This might be working for the shop that's got the sign since when you walk in there's always someone to talk to, who would sell to you, gauge your response and sell to you... (it's got me thinking about the day your wallet's at home and thought you're going to get a free beer! Not, I'd bounce right back out the door even if I would have loved to pay for it!).
It leads us to Rule No 1 - stop trying to trick people into clicking your ads showing the stuffs on the ad which isn't reflected going to be reflected on the lander - this isn't no offline biz where most of what you needed was to get people in the door then some silver-tongued person gets the sale.
Isn't that what you're trying to do - just send 1000 clicks to the lander? If people don't find what they want that's got them to click on the ad in the first place they'd bounce off.
A good example is a "chat dating offer ad"...you must have come across those dating ads, they show a "Jane Doe" online ready to chat with you. If you've tried that angle, you'd know they convert especially with facebook sounds.
Here's the ad below:



When the users click on the ad they don't expect to find a block of text, few bullet points about a dating site with millions of girls. No they want to find "Jane Doe"...so you give them that - you put pictures of Jane and a few good write ups about her and what she likes and how she's on the "other side" eagerly waiting to hit up with you. But they have to sign up first...
Now can you grasp the essence of "rhyming" the ads with the lander?
Simply put ads are nothing but extensions of the lander

Scenario 2: Kaput ads...

This is the dreaded situation where nobody clicks on the ad - but before you think; dumping the campaign...a lot of things might not be set for it to garner clicks - since in the first place your instincts told you that the campaign should work on that traffic - isn't that what we get by on at first with no tested data? "Pure predator instinct going in for the kill"!

Now here are the main reasons why people don't click on the ads...

Statistical significance - what does it mean? It's the probability that an event doesn't happen by chance...you need to allow the ad run for at least a day to conclude statistical significance. You might never know if people are really passing up the ad if you keep changing it by the hour. So let it run and you might just discover something called "day parting".
What's that? It's presenting your ad -- at the right time - to the right people. You might not get clicks during the morning but might in the afternoon or in the evening. How would know that if you don't let the ad run for a considerable amount of time.
Position: Is your ad's positioned "Above the fold" or "Below the fold"? - I think if you're running PPV or Facebook; that don't matter - but you need to make sure your ad is in a great position to be seen.
What I like to do is use a "float or layer ad", have you seen one? They get in front of the users' content like those PPV pop overs. If still they don't click then I can only conclude 1 thing - it's not going to work!
Not grabbing attention: How do this thing work? Your ads get noticed, then gets read, then the users follow the CTA...but what if perhaps your ads are invisible to the users?

Here are the few tricks to increase its visibility.

Use opposing colors: your ads shouldn't blend in the site you're placing it on but should stick out like the purple ad below.



Use Animations - since animations are moving elements, it gets them noticed!
Other things like creating an ugly ad can increase its visibility.

And lastly sometimes a campaign wouldn't work because of where the traffic is coming from so you need to find another traffic source or change up the offer.

That's pretty much it - it's more like plumbing! If the traffic gets clogged up at one junction, you go clear it up and let it flow.
You don't just keep your eye on the conversion when for all you know the traffic isn't getting pass the lander to make a conversion.
#ads #clicks #conversions #here’s #impressions
  • Profile picture of the author Greedy
    I've had a lot of success putting the price in the ad, it will get you much higher quality clicks, since the user is already pre-qualified. I use it as a later resort, but still very useful.
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    • Profile picture of the author GodOfCPA
      Honestly, a lot of the points raised in the OP are simply not true across the board, and only testing can prove if these suggestions work in your situation. Here's a few that stood out for me:

      Many times having your ad copy and design emulate the website it's placed on can get more clicks and conversions than a flashy ad that stands out. Especially if you choose to place your ads on a site that has high engagement and is used to kill time/be informed.

      Many times below the fold ads get better results in terms of CTR and CVR than above the fold. It's a complete myth that above the fold is always better for performance advertising (it's obviously better for branding buys, but that just pushes costs up).

      Many times using a high CTR ad like those chat banners leading to a lander that isn't about the chat subject converts better than connecting the ad and landing page directly - horny guys aren't working on logic and adult dating is all about getting a high volume of horny clicks, not convincing people logically. Those ads are about getting a lot of horny and dumb traffic to the highest converting landing page (whatever that is after testing).

      As for that "free beer" example, they are simply trying to attract attention of people who are looking to buy a beer and have many options. That's it. Nobody expects a free beer, but you need to get a beer buyer's attention somehow. Don't assume people are going to walk in and expect a free beer from a sign like that, but it does grab their attention. If your bar is nice, that can be enough.

      Day parting should never be entered into without AT LEAST 14 days data UNLESS you are experienced enough with your niche to know what times work best.

      Essentially, NEVER assume you know how people's thought processes work when going from banner impression to click to landing to conversion. Above the fold sounds right. Having a consistent message between banner and lander sounds right too. But neither of these are necessarily true.

      People need to let their own data guide them, not what sounds right.
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  • While it's ABSOLUTELY TRUE that testing, collecting data and optimizing (cutting what's not working and building on what's working) is the best way to go about creating profitable campaign. But i think you misread what i said "GodOfCPA" -

    To point out a few - you said -

    Many times below the fold ads get better results in terms of CTR and CVR than above the fold. It's a complete myth that above the fold is always better for performance advertising (it's obviously better for branding buys, but that just pushes costs up).

    But here's what i meant:

    Position: Is your ad's positioned "Above the fold" or "Below the fold"? - I think if you're running PPV or Facebook; that don't matter - but you need to make sure your ad is in a great position to be seen.
    They get in front of the users' content like those PPV pop overs. If still they don't click then I can only conclude 1 thing - it's not going to work!

    Since it wasn't a fully fledged post so you have to forgive my brevity - i didn't specifically say place ads Above the Fold - i asked what position their ads are in . Then simply left a no brainer point - "your ads needs to in a great position to be seen"...since i know for a fact that above or below the fold doesn't really count at times unless proven through testing

    (But i'm going to reiterate my stand here and say people should start off testing their campaigns with an above the fold ad except they have data to make an other-wise decision - there's always an element of truth in myths like you said "it's a
    complete myth that above the fold is always better for performance advertising").
    But anyways I'm going to be rational and not start out with a myth such as below the fold which is "rumored" to have less user engagement hence not famed for better performance advertising.
    It's simply just down to the simple math of going with the variables which will maximize your "probability" of winning at first...but what's constant is the data you get off testing as you have said and i never in my post dismissed that fact.

    Then i also added...

    What I like to do is use a "float or layer ad", have you seen one?
    Like you know, float ads have much higher CTR than the traditional banner ads - to them above or below the fold doesn't really matter. Since they superimpose on the users' requested pages then disappear only to re-appear again.
    So get me right mate - i didn't specifically say use above the fold.

    Secondly...
    Day parting should never be entered into without AT LEAST 14 days data UNLESS you are experienced enough with your niche to know what times work best.

    you're completely misquoting me here perhaps you mistook the part where i said -
    you need to allow the ad run for at least a day to conclude statistical significance -

    when i said this i didn't mean to say get into day parting after one day's worth test data - i said in order to conclude statistical significance -which really is knowing for a sure that the ads is getting no clicks - you need the ads to run for at least a day(more like saying even if you're so eager to kill the camapign let it run for a day). And as for chipping in "day-parting" - i never mentioned you should begin day-parting after a day's worth of data - i used sentences like "So let it run" in
    So let it run AND you might just discover something called "day parting".
    And sentences like
    "considerable amount of time"
    "How would know that if you don't let the ad run for a considerable amount of time".
    I don't have to bring out Webster to define considerable now do i? - though i'd be much clearer next time when writing a post.

    Thirdly about
    "
    Many times having your ad copy and design emulate the website it's placed on can get more clicks and conversions than a flashy ad that stands out. Especially if you choose to place your ads on a site that has high engagement and is used to kill time/be informed"

    You took that one right out of context - if you check it was under the sub-heading of Kaput ads...ads getting no clicks and perhaps it being not seen by the users is the problem - now don't tell me you haven't heard of how by implementing opposing colors increases both "clickability" (pardon that word) and visibility? A good example is the CTA buttons we have on our websites, we make them of different color to the website feel - they're never the same color ever! A sharp contrasting ad color on a webpage increases its visibility...it's a proven fact, you can ask the best of the best in this industry we're in!

    And lastly you mentioned people should let their data guide them but how do they get off the ground testing - the tips i've provided are the ones i have used when i'm always on the grind - trying to bring a campaign to profitability.

    Also like you said - blending your ads to sync quite stealthily with the web page it's on is something i've never tried - would look into that and let you know how it goes.

    P.S I'm a media buy dude; i don't know where you're coming from - PPV, PPC Facebook??



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    • Profile picture of the author GodOfCPA
      While it's ABSOLUTELY TRUE that testing, collecting data and optimizing (cutting what's not working and building on what's working) is the best way to go about creating profitable campaign. But i think you misread what i said "GodOfCPA" -

      Fair enough, I did take some things out of context in response. I was really just trying to muddy the waters, simply because when you really get into running ads (especially media buys) nothing is what you expect and I think it can actually be counter productive to even try and figure out why your ads aren't working using anything but a lot of testing data.

      (But i'm going to reiterate my stand here and say people should start off testing their campaigns with an above the fold ad except they have data to make an other-wise decision - there's always an element of truth in myths like you said "it's a complete myth that above the fold is always better for performance advertising").

      In my experience, every site is different and you can sometimes get more engagement from a below the fold placement in specific sites, or the lower costs (not competing with big brands so much) offsets the lower CTR and you come out on top. I suppose if you have a very limited budget, starting out with above the fold is a good idea, since it's more likely to work. But you might be leaving a lot of money on the table if you exclusively stick to those placements.

      So get me right mate - i didn't specifically say use above the fold.

      True. Again, I just wanted to offer a perspective because I have had surprising success with less prominent placements - surprising because everybody said place above the fold when I started researching media buys a few years ago, and only through testing did I find out that other placements work. Overlay ads are pretty good too, for sure. I've been experimenting with Adsupply's ad formats recently and it's been a good change.

      I don't have to bring out Webster to define considerable now do i? - though i'd be much clearer next time when writing a post.

      You're right. What I was trying to get at is day parting is a more 'advanced' aspect of a campaign and shouldn't be entered into prior to having a lot of conversions in the first place, in my opinion.

      now don't tell me you haven't heard of how by implementing opposing colors increases both "clickability" (pardon that word) and visibility? A good example is the CTA buttons we have on our websites, we make them of different color to the website feel - they're never the same color ever! A sharp contrasting ad color on a webpage increases its visibility...it's a proven fact, you can ask the best of the best in this industry we're in!

      CTA buttons are part of conversion optimization for web design, and things are pretty different when you're dealing with banners on a website. Sometimes making your ad too stand-out or different than the site it's placed on lowers trust - lowering CTR and CVR. In my experience, stand out flashy ads work for freebies, adult, and a few other highly emotion-driven niches. But I mostly run advertorial-based ads these days, and the flashier the ad, the worse the response (usually) for those kind of landers/niches. Not saying that you shouldn't use attention grabbing designs always, just that they don't have to be bright colors/different colors ot the placement site.

      And lastly you mentioned people should let their data guide them but how do they get off the ground testing - the tips i've provided are the ones i have used when i'm always on the grind - trying to bring a campaign to profitability.

      Right. I'm not saying you're wrong, just that the suggestions can be wrong in certain instances. I really just replied to ensure that anybody starting out remembers that they can't really understand why something isn't working until they test all different approaches. When you have no conversions at all but plenty of clicks, I think it's best to go as far with trying different angles as your budget allows - and rotate offers, which is hugely important in CPA.

      Also like you said - blending your ads to sync quite stealthily with the web page it's on is something i've never tried - would look into that and let you know how it goes.


      If you're running long-form copy/video/advertorial-style pages on sites that get a lot of engagement (info-based sites), you should definitely give it a go. Again, it's not always best, but when people are in the mood for reading/watching stuff you can get more clicks if there seems to be some consistency between the ad they're clicking and the site it's placed on. It's why those content.ad/outbrain/etc. ads work well, and one of the reasons why Facebook newsfeed performs really well.

      P.S I'm a media buy dude; i don't know where you're coming from - PPV, PPC Facebook??

      Started with PPV, then moved into display and Facebook. These days I use Facebook for mobile traffic (get banned every couple of months or so) and run desktop display campaigns across a lot of networks and direct sites. Mostly just health & beauty and some financial-related stuff these days.

      Media buying on a CPM model is where the real money is in my opinion, but it's very hard and I think you develop an instinct for what works only once you've experienced testing out all types of angles. That was what I was getting at in my previous post - people are weird in mass and never seem to behave how you'd expect them to, or how others say they'll behave, when you're not highly-experienced.
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