What Are Your Biggest Copywriting Challenges?

21 replies
Hi all--I'm getting ready to teach a course about copywriting and would LOVE to hear what your biggest challenges are when it comes to writing copy. Also, have you taken any courses or read any books to learn copywriting skills? If so, what are they and/or why did they (or didn't they) work for you? Any feedback would be great! Thanks!!
#biggest #challenges #copywriting
  • Profile picture of the author derekmagill
    I'm not sure if this is something that is teachable, but for me, it's developing your own voice. I think too much digital copy out there sounds exactly the same.

    I don't want to be another schmaltzy salesman — I want copy that sells, entertains, and stands out from the crowd.
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    • Profile picture of the author John Lloyd
      Originally Posted by derekmagill View Post

      I'm not sure if this is something that is teachable, but for me, it's developing your own voice. I think too much digital copy out there sounds exactly the same.

      I don't want to be another schmaltzy salesman — I want copy that sells, entertains, and stands out from the crowd.
      I'm always amazed to hear about writers struggling to find their voice.

      Speak. Write it down.

      There's your voice.

      Pure stream of consciousness is the only way to write. Anything else is a fabrication.
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  • Profile picture of the author KevinOBrien
    I agree with @kmlashley, Yes it is true that copywriting is also teachable, because its upon you that how you can rewrite an article which already written by some one, and it's also depend on your creativity and thinking power.
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    • Profile picture of the author EzraWinter
      Biggest challenge? Producing high quality work around products that I wouldn't use personally or don't believe in.
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  • Profile picture of the author nmwf
    In the past (for me), it was working with clients who obviously didn't know what they wanted from the beginning. They asked for revisions, changed their minds on those revisions, and just created an unpleasant experience all around. I found that a lot of the clients I wrote for wanted something written in "their" voice without providing any samples of what that voice was.

    Frustrating!
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    • Profile picture of the author Jennifer Hutson
      Originally Posted by nmwf View Post

      In the past (for me), it was working with clients who obviously didn't know what they wanted from the beginning. They asked for revisions, changed their minds on those revisions, and just created an unpleasant experience all around. I found that a lot of the clients I wrote for wanted something written in "their" voice without providing any samples of what that voice was.

      Frustrating!
      That's why you thoroughly vet a client before ever starting on a project. I never initiate a contract with someone who is wishy washy or won't give me the information I need to determine what they want.

      These clients are very easy to avoid with the proper line of questioning.
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  • Hello kmlashley

    What Are My Biggest Challenges Copywriting?

    Write persuasive sales letter high conversion services for various niches totally different that I obviously did not know before.
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  • Profile picture of the author samex4rill
    I think my biggest challenge is getting hungry while copy writing.

    it requires much brain effort which consumes glucose.
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  • Profile picture of the author Sean DeSilva
    Based on the rewrites I've done for clients, novice copywriters have trouble walking the line between selling credible benefits and overhyping the offer.
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  • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
    Are you presenting to new copywriters or experienced ones?

    That's going to make a big difference.

    New copywriters aren't going to have enough experience to even know what their real challenges are yet. Most of them will probably ask you about how to find clients, how to charge, how to quote projects etc.

    But if they've been doing this for a while, they've probably figured out that the most important thing is managing client relationships: Screening new clients. Clarifying and managing expectations. Making sure their work actually gets used before it undergoes a half-dozen revisions by everyone from the client's business coach to their dog.

    Experienced writers have been through enough BS with these things that they're willing to listen to strategies for improving these areas. From my experience coaching new writers just aren't aware of this or willing to take them seriously yet.

    Also, you have to decide whether you're going to cover business strategies or writing strategies, or both. Those are two huge topics and the more you try to cover, the less they're going to retain.

    You could always cover one of them and turn the second topic into a sell from stage offer.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jennifer Hutson
      Originally Posted by sethczerepak View Post

      Also, you have to decide whether you're going to cover business strategies or writing strategies, or both. Those are two huge topics and the more you try to cover, the less they're going to retain.
      Personally, I'd be more interested in business strategies than writing strategies. I'd love to learn more about how to market myself better through cold calling.

      I can write a killer email pitch, but when it comes to the thought of cold-calling a prospect, it sends shivers down my spine. I know cold-calling typically yields better results than cold emailing, so that's definitely an area I'd be interested in improving.

      I would appreciate any tips on how to have successful phone conversations with potential clients in a guide.

      Anyway, that's my two cents on the whole shebang.
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      • Originally Posted by Jennifer Hutson View Post

        Personally, I'd be more interested in business strategies than writing strategies. I'd love to learn more about how to market myself better through cold calling.

        I can write a killer email pitch, but when it comes to the thought of cold-calling a prospect, it sends shivers down my spine. I know cold-calling typically yields better results than cold emailing, so that's definitely an area I'd be interested in improving.

        I would appreciate any tips on how to have successful phone conversations with potential clients in a guide.

        Anyway, that's my two cents on the whole shebang.

        You just reminded me that most people think the same way about cold calling, thanks. What kind of writing do you do?
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      • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
        Originally Posted by Jennifer Hutson View Post

        Personally, I'd be more interested in business strategies than writing strategies. I'd love to learn more about how to market myself better through cold calling.

        I can write a killer email pitch, but when it comes to the thought of cold-calling a prospect, it sends shivers down my spine. I know cold-calling typically yields better results than cold emailing, so that's definitely an area I'd be interested in improving.

        I would appreciate any tips on how to have successful phone conversations with potential clients in a guide.

        Anyway, that's my two cents on the whole shebang.
        Have you been through Jordan Belfort's "Straight Line Persuasion" or David Sandler's Sales system? Priceless stuff in both of those on phone prospecting.
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        • Profile picture of the author Enfusia
          The only challenge I've ever had was when I kicked my own butt and accepted writing a letter for a fashion company.

          I don't like, nor understand fashion. That was the toughest letter I ever wrote.

          Patrick
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          • Profile picture of the author Cam Connor
            Originally Posted by Enfusia View Post

            The only challenge I've ever had was when I kicked my own butt and accepted writing a letter for a fashion company.

            I don't like, nor understand fashion. That was the toughest letter I ever wrote.

            Patrick
            I can totally relate to that.

            Everytime I see some sort of fashion sales copy gig, I think to myself, how on Earth would I write for that?

            It seems like an impossible task...

            What do you say, really? "This will look ridiculously good on you?" "This is in fashion?", etc? I mean, what? lol
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            • Profile picture of the author Enfusia
              Originally Posted by Cam Connor View Post

              I can totally relate to that.

              Everytime I see some sort of fashion sales copy gig, I think to myself, how on Earth would I write for that?

              It seems like an impossible task...

              What do you say, really? "This will look ridiculously good on you?" "This is in fashion?", etc? I mean, what? lol
              Yeah, I see models walking down the runway with a dead fish on their head and I just don't get it.

              The only other niches I don't write in are porn and religion. You will lose clients over it. Other clients find out and they don't like the religious view or don't like the fetish and then think poorly of you.

              Patrick
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        • Profile picture of the author Jennifer Hutson
          Originally Posted by sethczerepak View Post

          Have you been through Jordan Belfort's "Straight Line Persuasion" or David Sandler's Sales system? Priceless stuff in both of those on phone prospecting.
          Does watching The Wolf of Wallstreet count? Lol.

          I'll have to check them out - I haven't actually read any phone sales courses because I do pretty well with emailing and networking/referrals. I just know cold calling generally drives better results and I'd really like to get over my fear of it.
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  • Jennifer,

    Write an enticing 3-5 sentence "script"

    Phone the decision makers in your chosen "researched by you" businesses (not always easy, but no point speaking to anyone else).

    Give your quick pitch.

    2 things happen.


    Them - "I'm not interested"

    You - "No problem. Thanks for your time. I'll let you get on with your day, Bye"

    (This saves untold hassle in trying to "make" them interested)


    2nd scenario

    Them - "Sounds interesting, tell me more

    You - Tell them more (all prepared in advance) and set up an appointment (or whatever you want the next stage to be)


    My point - when you hit the phone you only ever want "interested" potential clients.

    Rather than trying to convert the unconvertibles, or light up those who prefer the dark (and to be fair, they never asked for the call so no need for an endless "battle").

    It's much faster and far less stressful to only aim for the people who want the service (there's plenty of them).

    After you've made two dozen calls or so, any nervousness disappears and it becomes very easy to do.



    Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author TypingPandas
    Hi,

    I agree with @nmwf - it's quite difficult to work with clients who don't provide you enough details and specifications, although you required them. Once your work is finished, they start whining that the copy isn't good, but they didn't bother to answer your question and offer you examples of how they want the work to be done. It's like writing when you're blindfolded.

    Other challenges:
    - Writing for niches we know nothing about (especially when it comes to technical ones)
    - Poor research or not finding enough resources on the internet and having to somewhat guess or invent what you need to write. This is a problem when having to write about specific things.

    Hope this helps.

    Best,
    TypingPandas
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  • Profile picture of the author ChrisNosal
    Banned
    Focus on helping people.

    We see the same ad over and over from 20+ people today, and don't know how to tell one product from another.

    We don't go on the internet looking for advertising - we go on looking for information.

    Focus on letting customers see for themselves how valuable your content is, and build your marketing around helping your customers and providing value.
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  • "C'mon, let's play outta da box together here!" !

    *presents

    a) everything outside the box I figure wasn't figured inside any kinda box. Preezented. Au SpeakUese.

    (Because those were the instructions.)*

    Plus, my rule: There is no b) for crap. *servants, not masters* *sobs*

    Yeah, ok, so we're optioned out here all the way back to zero when you box up on all my schmoozle.

    Bottom line: Shifting your outta da box targets means shifting you, so WHY ASK?

    Copywriters: stop being so feeble.
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