Would you work for free or cheap for your first client?

51 replies
Hey copywriters, would you recommend working for free or cheap for your first client just to get some testimonials to use to build your credibility?
Cheers
#cheap #client #free #work
  • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
    Being called cheap doesn't exactly build your credibility.

    A new freelancer should resist the temptation to start low. It shows a lack of belief in your ability and positions you at the wrong (and overcrowded) end of the scale. Plus, it's generally much harder than you'd expect to raise your fees down the line without antagonizing existing clients.

    IMO, you should always charge what you consider your service is worth. Get testimonials that speak about your quality, not your price, and you'll be less exposed to competition.
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    • Profile picture of the author londonprince
      Fair enough that's true. Thanks alot.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jamell
    Yes I would . Give that person so much value for time that they will become ike a walking billboard for you .

    And it's a great way to open the door for future business i.e sales .
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    • Profile picture of the author thatweirdkid
      But then won't you be referred to based on your price rather than your quality/ability?
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    they will become ike a walking billboard for you .
    What would the billboard say? "This guy works for free"?
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    • Profile picture of the author DABK
      Most likely, it would say one of these:
      1. Sucker!
      2. Cheap copywriter.
      3. Can't pay for copywriting? This is the guy for you."

      Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

      What would the billboard say? "This guy works for free"?

      You can copywrite for yourself, can't you?


      Originally Posted by Gal Gadot View Post

      Yes, of course. Getting work experience for free will definitely a great opportunity.

      My answers are based on the following
      free = for nothing.


      Free could mean for no money, but getting something else instead, guaranteed, like a referral.


      The latter, not a bad idea, depending on what you're getting... A referral to my cousin Viny, who thinks he wants to start a company and and wants to pay $50 for an ad or to a company that is willing and able to pay a couple thousand dollars now and, if you produce, will hire you again a few times a year...


      Testimonials? The job better be really small and the testimonial long on praise.
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  • Profile picture of the author marciayudkin
    Hey copywriters, would you recommend working for free or cheap for your first client just to get some testimonials to use to build your credibility?
    Yes. When I train brand-new copywriters, I have them right in the middle of the training line up 1 or 2 acquaintances (relatives, friends, local businesses, favorite nonprofits, etc.) for whom they'll do a small copywriting job in exchange for a testimonial. Not only does this get them something they can post on their website, it builds their confidence.

    No one needs to know what they charged for that job. The testimonial speaks to the quality.of the work and the customer's satisfaction. Of course, if the work wasn't satisfactory, there'd be no testimonial. The work is always satisfactory, though, because I provide feedback to the mentoree while he/she is working on that assignment.

    Since the freebie wasn't advertised, it's not equivalent to starting off your career at the bottom. Once they finish their training, they charge regular rates.

    The only downside of this strategy is that sometimes when someone is getting something for free, they don't cooperate with what they need to do on their end - e.g., providing the basic info for the piece. But then you just find someone else to do this with.

    Marcia Yudkin
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    • Profile picture of the author JJdigital
      This is the play! Thanks Marcia
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  • Profile picture of the author surfer30
    Free is the most powerful marketing strategies out there, you can be grateful when you get amazing results for your clients, and then charge them. That's clear. I still remember when Russel Brunson started teaching his finnel campaigns and he decided to do it for free. Then get paid when they get results. You can follow that path.
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    Originally Posted by londonprince View Post

    Hey copywriters, would you recommend working for free or cheap for your first client just to get some testimonials to use to build your credibility?
    Cheers
    Yes. Free. But I would only do it for very easy jobs, with the agreement of a testimonial. I wouldn't do the work in the hopes of a testimonial.

    In fact, your "very easy short job" if successful, would lead to additional full fee work with the same company.

    The problem with "cheap" is that this is now what they expect to pay. Of course, that would only apply to the same company.
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  • Profile picture of the author spartan14
    I would work cheaper to get some good rates in the beginning but i would not work for free
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  • Profile picture of the author Dario Fumagalli
    It all depends on how you frame it.

    A deal like: "I give you a discount, you shall give me a review", is very different than "I know my value is low, therefore I am giving my hours away for cheap".

    In my personal experience, what you do to a customer the first day tends to stick forever.
    If you build 10 customers by giving away value for nothing, they will always demand you work fast, well and for close to free.

    Plus, there's the eternal law: "who pays the least, demands and complains the most".

    Write it down, learn it for a life. You'll thank me in years to come.

    Build a minimum amount of customers as an humble rookie but be ready to dump them when you become good. Most of them will never accept you suddenly charge 3 times as much, most of them will loudly demand work done for yesterday even when you'll be a Fortune 500 copywriter.

    So, start humble, then quickly ramp up your skills and your price. Who won't accept the change, just => dump. It's like layers: the first customers are best lost than kept. The richer customers you meet the least complaints and time-boxing you'll receive.
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  • Profile picture of the author Matthew Stanley
    Interesting (and helpful) to note how many accomplished folks here distinguish between "free" (worthwhile as a means to generate strong testimonials and social proof of your high quality services) and "cheap" (not very advisable; anchors people to a certain cost it may be hard to move from). Totally agree. As I heard someone else say recently, positioning and pricing should be congruous. In most clients' eyes, "premium" services rarely cost $10 / hour...
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  • Profile picture of the author Princess Balestra
    Free is the prelood to spree
    if'n you know where to be --
    now & plus also the fyootyoore,
    from outta which nowan can bootchya.
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  • Profile picture of the author max5ty
    "Hey Bob, I'll write a sales letter for the ugly socks you want to sell and won't charge you anything upfront. If you're happy with all the ugly crap you sell, you can pay me $xxxxx after 14 days and we can pair up...

    I'll continue to tweak and split test until you're the sock king of Montana.

    If it sucks and we're not a matching pair, tell me to put a sock in it and we'll part ways"

    Other than the situation Marcia suggested, I wouldn't work for free without a clause.

    You have to also realize that most of the people that would want you to work for free are probably not your best clients because they're probably selling junk out of their garage, or have no real business, or have no real business plan...or they just discovered marketing through a webinar and have decided to dip their toe into the water and hope it works without costing them anything.

    Now, if it is a reputable business, and you want to get in on the action...you can simply tell them you'll write a sales letter (etc.) and if it beats their control they'll pay you $xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.

    So, if you have to...and I've mentioned other ways I'd do it to get started before...but if you decide to go this route, I'd have them pay if it works, or if it beats what they have
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    • Profile picture of the author GordonJ
      Being a contrarian, and having been forced to learn Adobe, Aldus and Quark (then QuarkXpress)...because the company I worked for at the time wanted their copywriters to be able to lay out the promotion, rough drafts, for the pros to fix.

      So, if I were doing a full page ad in USA TODAY, I'd have to lay it out as it would look, including matching the fonts, etc. Same for a direct mail piece or magazine ad. We didn't have to be pros at design (although a couple were) but we had to be able to do very close look alikes to what the promotion was, we had in mind.

      When I wanted work, I would pick a company, lay out an ad, and basically say to them: Test this ad, if it doesn't break even, I'll pay the difference.

      In other words, CONFIDENCE in my abilities. And having never had to pay anyone, it worked for me.

      Now today's new breed of copywriters have bought into the idea their words are magic and all you need is a yellow pad, a pen and a mint julep at the beach.

      What I ask of the newbie who wants to find work is: how many companies have you approached and what promotions are ready to go?

      Since most have more time on their hands, instead of hand copying old world ads out by hand, CREATE ads for today's market.

      As Max5ty points out, have an agreement in place to insure you get paid for your work, and here is one "secret" I'll share...I've yet to encounter a client who didn't want MORE once he's seen the results (more moolah in his pocket),

      Easiest thing in the world to do is get a client,

      if,

      you can get results.

      Maybe try putting your AZZ on the line or your money where your mouth is, in the meantime, write a promotion for some PLR or something.

      GordonJ


      Originally Posted by max5ty View Post

      "Hey Bob, I'll write a sales letter for the ugly socks you want to sell and won't charge you anything upfront. If you're happy with all the ugly crap you sell, you can pay me after 14 days and we can pair up...

      I'll continue to tweak and split test until you're the sock king of Montana.

      If it sucks and we're not a matching pair, tell me to put a sock in it and we'll part ways"

      Other than the situation Marcia suggested, I wouldn't work for free without a clause.

      You have to also realize that most of the people that would want you to work for free are probably not your best clients because they're probably selling junk out of their garage, or have no real business, or have no real business plan...or they just discovered marketing through a webinar and have decided to dip their toe into the water and hope it works without costing them anything.

      Now, if it is a reputable business, and you want to get in on the action...you can simply tell them you'll write a sales letter (etc.) and if it beats their control they'll pay you .

      So, if you have to...and I've mentioned other ways I'd do it to get started before...but if you decide to go that route, I'd have them pay if it works, or if it beats what they have
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    I've changed my mind. A testimonial's value is largely based on who it is from. A testimonial from a mattress store is useful for other mattress stores, and maybe other small retailers. But companies that sell through the mail to their list....or through dealers?

    The testimonial has to have heft.

    And there is a huge difference between a testimonial from a company, and a referral from that company. A referral means business if it includes an introduction. So I would concentrate on referrals rather than testimonials.

    If you have no clients, no testimonials and no experience, I still think you should sell something yourself, until you know what you are doing. The greatest advantage you can have when looking for a job...is not needing the job.
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    • Profile picture of the author Princess Balestra
      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      The testimonial has to have heft.
      Split test yr flaps thusly ...

      1.

      "My life was changed utterly by your service! Top Dollar! Angels now spring from my ass and perform $$$ miracles!"

      Mike Whatevah
      CEO You Don't Give AF or Even Recognise.

      2.

      "Thanks."

      Bill Gates
      (Bio is prolly irrelevant less'n you figure he is out to poison your kids or whatevah ... point is, kudos propels swanky. Feel free to substitoot Lady Gaga here if you figure Gates is a crank. Likely both these fkrs got you started up -- unlike that Mike Whomsoevah guy an' his vacuously effervescent oblivion.)

      *** Answer Quest ***

      Back in the day ... when you were defnittly a way more innocent an' impressionable version of your present self ... ain't it the case you were presented with all kindsa crazy offers an' opportoonities coulda transformed your life beyond UTTERLY?

      Uh huh, gotta be troo -- bcs you hooman.

      So: what did alla the stuff you kicked out say?

      Word for word?

      Quote by quote?

      Anywan wantsta fill their soul got a head start on directin' umselves away from such crap.

      Evrywan reads an ad wants so very much outta life prolly they could scream.

      What is here to step 'em forward in sum way proven?

      Hi, I'm Mike Whatevah, and I'd like to take this opportunity to be truly PROUD to announce to you my new

      TOTAL COSMOS SUCCESS/HAPPINESS MIRACLE

      It changed my life 100% totally utterly -- and now it can do the same for you.

      Naturally, we have to agree what the value of "100% totally utterly" means to you in the context of my personal experience and transformation ...

      so let me tell you more about MYSELF.

      (if WF has a virtyool guillotine function, likely you wanna check it out now.)







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  • Profile picture of the author Jonathan 2.0
    Yeah "cheap" isn't a great word. Maybe consider "Reduced price for a limited time."
    : )
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    If you are a COPYWRITER - you should not have to work for free or for cheap to get reviews.


    Either write copy good enough to convince someone to hire you....or as GordonJ suggested above - do the work and propose payment based on results.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jonathan 2.0
      I appreciate your opinion, Kay. However I think that many times working for a smaller fee than many other Copywriters can be a good option for an Apprentice Copywriter -- not only to hone their craft, but to receive positive feedback/testimonials.

      Everyone has to start somewhere and I think this could be a good option for an Apprentice Copywriter.

      I could be wrong, however. I'm more an Entrepreneur.
      :
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  • Profile picture of the author Gal Gadot
    Yes, of course. Getting work experience for free will definitely a great opportunity.
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  • Profile picture of the author ThePromotionalGuy
    Hellor LondonPrince,

    First off, I'm jaded.

    My advice is back alley. Unpopular. In Your Face!

    You and probably those here won't like it.

    I grew up running the streets when I was 10.

    You learn quickly. Money Talks...BS Walks.

    So, I have ALWAYS hustled my businesses for a buck...Many Bucks!!!

    You want to write free or cheap?

    Only YOUR business gets that exclusive attention.

    FREE?... This is BUSINESS! (Leonidas voice)

    There are millions upon millions of businesses that need copy or content or both.

    They will throw money at you...BUT YOU HAVE TO HUNT THEM DOWN!

    And yeah. That SUCKS!!! But that's business!!!

    No one is entitled to get you to give away your time (except maybe your momma)

    They must have skin in the game.

    In my 28 years hunting and pecking the keyboard, EVERY CLIENT ponied up the money.

    Positive testimonials use to carry weight.

    Now they are subjective and due to more current research and studies.

    The buying public puts more weight on NEGATIVE testimonials.

    The main point to ALWAYS remember...

    YOU'RE A BUSINESS OWNER FIRST!!!

    Your business provides a paid service.

    Chinchilla
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    • Profile picture of the author Jonathan 2.0
      Good point ThePromontionalGuy. I like your "No-Nonsense" Style. : )

      A Copywriter has to build their skill set though ― and it could backfire if they're charging what Established Copywriters are charging. My advice would be work for a reduced fee (for a limited) time to really become a proficient Copywriter, before they start charging mid to high prices. Maybe that's obvious, however I thought I would mention it anyway.

      As Marcia Yudkin mentioned above, that also gives them the opportunity to build their confidence and that's important.

      2C
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      • Profile picture of the author ThePromotionalGuy
        Hellor Jonathan 2.0,

        Originally Posted by Jonathan 2.0 View Post

        Good point ThePromontionalGuy. I like your "No-Nonsense" Style. : )

        A Copywriter has to build their skill set though ― and it could backfire if they're charging what Established Copywriters are charging. My advice would be work for a reduced fee (for a limited) time to really become a proficient Copywriter, before they start charging mid to high prices. Maybe that's obvious, however I thought I would mention it anyway.

        As Marcia Yudkin mentioned above, that also gives them the opportunity to build their confidence and that's important.

        2C
        Your post has so much fear built into it and concession.

        Being in business is a risk from day one, until your last day in business.

        There is NOTHING to overcome. Failing is a constant business hurdle.

        As so, we business owners fail daily. Then we pick ourselves back up and push forward.

        As for skill set - A copywriter continually hones their skills until the day they retire or take their last breath. There is no "I've Made It" pinnacle.

        As for what established copywriters charge - There is no chart for that and any shrewd copywriter worth their weight will never disclose their fees. I don't care what their YouTube or webpages state.

        As for being a proficient copywriter. There is no such animal. You're only as good as your last project's success.

        As for building confidence - A person must switch their employee mindset to a business owner mindset. And that takes years...

        Sugarcoating the realities of business is a disservice to those who choose our profession.

        Chinchilla
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        • Profile picture of the author Jonathan 2.0
          Originally Posted by ThePromotionalGuy View Post

          Your post has so much fear built into it and concession.
          Really?? If that's what you interpreted from my post, then you're wrong. I was just attempting to be "realistic."
          As much as I like your "gusto"/Go For It Approach, many times that kind of mindset can backfire. Balance is important.

          I actually agree ― and practice ― most of your post. Frankly though, I can't be bothered commenting on it.
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          • Profile picture of the author ThePromotionalGuy
            Hellor Jonathan,

            Originally Posted by Jonathan 2.0 View Post

            Really?? If that's what you interpreted from my post, then you're wrong. I was just attempting to be "realistic."

            As much as I like your "gusto"/Go For It Approach, many times that kind of mindset can backfire. Balance is important.

            I actually agree ― and practice ― most of your post. Frankly though, I can't be bothered commenting on it.
            Wow! More fear!

            Chinchilla
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            • Profile picture of the author Jonathan 2.0
              Originally Posted by ThePromotionalGuy View Post

              Wow! More fear!

              Chinchilla
              (Lol) In a Business/Marketing context ... There's nothing necessarily wrong with "fear". I suppose many Guys like to believe that they're not afraid of anything ― however it would be highly unusual for a Person not to have a certain amount of fear when beginning a new Venture (including Copywriting).

              My favourite quotation from Bruce Lee and Susan Jeffers is: "Feel the fear and do it anyway." Fear can't stop a Person unless they let it.
              : )
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              • Profile picture of the author ThePromotionalGuy
                Hellor Jonathan 2.0
                Originally Posted by Jonathan 2.0 View Post

                (Lol) In a Business/Marketing context, there's nothing necessarily wrong with "fear". I suppose many Guys like to believe that they're not afraid of anything ― however it would be highly unusual for a Person not to have a certain amount of fear when beginning a new Venture (including Copywriting).

                My favourite quotation from Bruce Lee and Susan Jeffers is: "Feel the fear and do it anyway." Fear can't stop a Person unless they let it.
                : )
                It's not unusual. Starting a new venture is easy. It's a thrill. The hunt. The chase.

                It's the sticking with it part, where I find the skeletons of those who gave up searching for the next client.

                Chinchilla
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                • Profile picture of the author Jonathan 2.0
                  Originally Posted by ThePromotionalGuy View Post

                  It's not unusual. Starting a new venture is easy. It's a thrill. The hunt. The chase.

                  It's the sticking with it part, where I find the skeletons of those who gave up searching for the next client.

                  Chinchilla
                  Absolutely: I agree. : ) Many People start well, however they have to keep going and be persistent to be successful.
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                • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
                  Originally Posted by ThePromotionalGuy View Post

                  Hellor Jonathan 2.0


                  It's not unusual. Starting a new venture is easy. It's a thrill. The hunt. The chase.

                  It's the sticking with it part, where I find the skeletons of those who gave up searching for the next client.
                  That's the difference.

                  It's not even that successful business people put up with the grind, because it takes them to their goals. It's the grind itself, the struggle that attracts them.
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                  • Profile picture of the author GordonJ
                    Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

                    That's the difference.

                    It's not even that successful business people put up with the grind, because it takes them to their goals. It's the grind itself, the struggle that attracts them.
                    Claude and ThePromotionGuy,

                    INDEED.
                    It's not unusual. Starting a new venture is easy. It's a thrill. The hunt. The chase.

                    It's the sticking with it part, where I find the skeletons of those who gave up searching for the next client.
                    .

                    Online, and especially here at WF, where the whole idea is about making money with Internet Marketing and the appeal of doing it...

                    well it floats many a boat. The so-called grind is often about self-discovery. And I think Claude may be able to testify to this: many in home or door to door salespeople give up early on because it is a grind and they discover they just can't handle the rejection.

                    Those who keep with it, and this is just my OPINION, seem to be in a self discovery mode...what can I do differently to make a sale, what am I doing wrong, what have I learned and can build on for next time.

                    In almost all fields where there is direct face to face selling, those who get good at it and make the highest dollars, aren't motivated by the grind, but by being thrilled with every sale, every close, every success which gets easier and easier to do.

                    And it is true across the board too, those doing difficult or challenging work will often get an EMOTIONAL reward from a job well done, and a monetary reward too.

                    NOW, here is the flip side. Sometimes the grind becomes just that, a difficult chore to do.

                    I have discovered my own way of not getting ground down. First, the reason WHY I am doing something. If making money is the ONLY answer I get, then my choice is a quick, short term, "set it and forget" type project which could be an income stream, albeit maybe a trickle with time...for decades. I have two 20+ year reports which are still being sold today. And I haven't talked to a customer in over a decade.

                    So, the WHY at the beginning, which seldom gets asked, will often lead to the HOW.

                    WHY did you (or in self discover, I) choose to become a copywriter?

                    And I'd bet today, the majority answer would be, I can write so why not get paid big bux to do it, just need to learn a few techniques then I'll be all set. Which is the exact promotional strategy used by those selling copywriting training.

                    A few will make good. The ones that make it a career, stick with it through the grinding times, because they have the desire to BEAT THEMSELVES, to prove to themselves that they can do it. They are internally motivated, and I think we can find many examples here of those chasing MONEY, or in this case Copywriting and have not identified a deeper connection to the craft. .

                    Well, the question I would ask is WHY? What do you want and why?

                    If NOT having clients is one answer, (like I discovered I didn't want anymore) then you ask the HOW.

                    All the techniques, methods, knowledge in the world can't overcome the grind, unless there is the internal desire to improve and one way that manifests in the world is by how much people are willing to pay you.

                    OK, rant over for now. Good day.

                    GordonJ
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                    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
                      Originally Posted by GordonJ View Post


                      In almost all fields where there is direct face to face selling, those who get good at it and make the highest dollars, aren't motivated by the grind, but by being thrilled with every sale, every close, every success which gets easier and easier to do.
                      Another outstanding post, as expected.

                      Truth to tell, I never enjoyed selling. I never felt an emotional charge when I made a sale. I was never depressed when I didn't get one.

                      To me, it was all a process. A series of experiments....tests...with one goal. I wanted to be great at something, and I knew I could be great at selling, eventually, if I would just figure it all out.

                      It was all a journey to becoming exceptional. Even now, I read books on selling/psychology/marketing/copywriting. The process is fascinating to me. Understanding human behavior. It's the "Aha" moments I look forward to.

                      Teaching selling is also enjoyable, because I relive the process of discovery.
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        • Profile picture of the author Princess Balestra
          Originally Posted by ThePromotionalGuy View Post

          A copywriter continually hones their skills until the day they retire or take their last breath.
          Dear Homework Assignment,

          Natchrlly I would wanna be immortal -- or sum decent proportion thereof -- but I realise sumday my tits're gonna swing 'bout my ankles ... if'n only bcs I postyoorly crippled like no hunchback.

          So can we mebbe arrange for Moi to look in on a free Last Breath sample?

          So I can look ahead to a brighter fyooture, fully cognisanteau of my unavoidable demise?

          I do naht smoke, so I would nevah snort them respirational secrets into muh veins on no whim.

          But, like they say, you gotta live evry day like it were your last.

          What is the air like ovah there in that diminishin' cosmos?

          How hard I gotta press my own lungs to make such sufferin' even remotely possible?

          I would wish always for copy stuffs to thrash with the dual buzz of fear an' adventure you see in most homework assignments.

          Princess, you got no ideah what you gonna say next, but you smart an' you informed, so prolly it is worth a crack. So eithah you rush this so you can get out an' kiss guys or you fix it propah so you can nail your grades.

          Gotta figure creatin' the fyootyoore from outta what may merely be rubble is a big ask.

          Uh huh ... I got activity gowin' on outside my apartment.

          Much as I wanna provide the final ansah always, prolly this be a prelood.

          How hard can it be to differentiate between lovers havin' an audibly tough time an' the onset of an alien invasion involvin' rat-themed drones?

          Tellya, if'n anywan birthin' the NAIL THAT SOUND ear implant, I wanna write out alla the schwango ...
          Signature

          Lightin' fuses is for blowin' stuff togethah.

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  • Profile picture of the author WF- Enzo
    Administrator
    No. I'll charge them my regular rate.

    Originally Posted by londonprince View Post

    Hey copywriters, would you recommend working for free or cheap for your first client just to get some testimonials to use to build your credibility?
    Cheers
    Signature
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  • Profile picture of the author JJdigital
    I think both sides are reasonable in this. Your time is worth something so don't do work for free, I can see the point in this.

    But if I am thinking long term, I want to get a case study as soon as possible so I can show this to potential clients so they know I am damn good at what I do.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by JJdigital View Post

      I think both sides are reasonable in this. Your time is worth something so don't do work for free, I can see the point in this.

      But if I am thinking long term, I want to get a case study as soon as possible so I can show this to potential clients so they know I am damn good at what I do.
      For what it's worth.

      It's not much easier to sell a job for free than it is at a discount. And it's not a harder sale to make at your regular price.

      I know that doesn't seem right. But it is.

      If you sell a job and it pays for the client, you'll get a nice referral or testimonial anyway.
      Signature
      One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

      "Be kind. For everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle".....Ian Maclaren
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  • Profile picture of the author 1Bryan
    Who cares what gets you in the game? The point is to get in the game. Just get in the game. There's no right answer and no wrong answer.
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  • Profile picture of the author Gary Floyd
    My policy has always been, if I haven't done something before, I will not ask for payment because I can't guarantee the results. This applies to new skills or techniques, like first time shooting a commercial or first time editing a slew of home videos.

    In most cases my work has been quality enough the client decides to pay me anyway, but if they don't it's been a valuable experience that I can use to more confidently describe the scope and degree of my services in the future.
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    Here is a question...
    How do you know you are any good at copywriting?

    Personally, I knew nothing about writing ads that paid. So I spent 2 full years studying ads in magazines (maybe 20 years ago), reading classic books on advertising and copywriting, and testing what I was learning in ads I ran for myself.

    It took me two years of real effort before I made an ad pay more than it cost. And that was just at the beginning of my study of how to sell in print.

    At what point do you try to get someone to invest real money in your copywriting talent?

    I like Marcia's idea of working as an apprentice to an established copywriter.

    I have talked to lots of marketing managers that are paid a salary to advertise and promote a company. And when I ask them what books they have read on advertising or copywriting, they say "Yeah, I've heard there are books out there. But I never read them. I know what I'm doing".

    No. No they don't. The only thing that saves them is that the people who hired them don't know anything about marketing/copywriting/advertising either. So they end up blaming the economy, the weather, or politics for their failures.

    I feel better now..
    Signature
    One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

    "Be kind. For everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle".....Ian Maclaren
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    • Profile picture of the author londonprince
      True. I started a candle company so am testing my copy there for FB ads. So that's how Im testing at the moment am trying find a master copywriter where I can be an apprentice also
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      • Profile picture of the author ThePromotionalGuy
        Hellor LondonPrince,
        Originally Posted by londonprince View Post

        True. I started a candle company so am testing my copy there for FB ads. So that's how Im testing at the moment am trying find a master copywriter where I can be an apprentice also
        This is OUTSTANDING NEWS!

        I don't care what platform you use to test YOUR copy.

        As long as YOU'RE writing it.

        That is the best way you will get serious copywriting chops.

        The moment you discover your words, just sold your candles you will get fired up.

        It's that exhilarating!

        You will get instantly hooked, and want to do it again, and again, and again.

        I've done that for every company I owned and operated.

        I've had great pieces and monumental copy failures.

        But, I'm addicted to writing copy because I keep pushing my boundaries.

        Good luck!

        Chinchilla
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        • Originally Posted by ThePromotionalGuy View Post


          But, I'm addicted to writing copy because I keep pushing my boundaries.

          Good luck!

          Chinchilla
          What we talkin' here is life adventures.

          Why do anythin'?

          Why write 'bout stuff?

          I guess what is gowin' on here is a weirdsy kinda pulse between the sportsy an' the cerebral.

          Sumtimes, you jus' wanna get in on the actschwaan -- superindulge in all the pleasure of the moment.

          But if'n these moments are worth anythin' at all, natchrlly you gonna reflect on 'em aftah & betweensy -- from brightest juicy to sullenest despair.

          Hey, an' why bothah dowin' that less'n it makes sum kinda diffrence to what happens next?

          Always there is a pulse of expectation an' outcome -- sumplace we at & sumplace we gowin', longside whethah we in our dowin' duds or nakedly dreamin' a la flopout chill.

          I would considah anywan got expertise 'bout this intrinsically homan pulse to nevah wanna view the fyooyure as any kinda cheapo commodity.

          Did I say this before any time soon?

          Turns out I'm a cock-eyed hoppertimist who can actschwlly SPELL.
          Signature

          Lightin' fuses is for blowin' stuff togethah.

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  • Profile picture of the author michaelwilson777
    Hmm. Honestly, I feel there is no sense in this idea. It can be actual in one case when you are working on a company and they asked you to do that in the test for. In other cases, I don't know how can it work.
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  • For cheap, yes. For free, no.

    If I'm bringing in good results, it'll be my basis to set my rate higher.

    If I didn't deliver, well, that just means I still need to study and practice more.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alnoman marketer
    If you say cheep -my answer yes and say free my answer is no.
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  • Profile picture of the author Lisa Richards
    Banned
    Yeah for starters I can but with a condition that If they get results from my content writing/copy writing I'll have to eventually charge more
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  • Profile picture of the author KylieSweet
    Instead of working free for your first client It would be better if you will present your successful portfolio to convince your customers that you are well experienced in the field.
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  • Profile picture of the author tnob
    In one business I started, the 1st client did not like the risk associated with being the first client of a new business. So to quell his hesitation, we offered to roll in our fees to the backend. We only got paid when the client got paid. If the client didn't get paid, then we wouldn't get paid.

    This was alignment for us both. The client was happy because if it worked out, he would make money, but if not, he would not lose money. We were very determined to make it a success because that's the only way we would get paid.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rniro1337
    I think I can work free, if the project will be really interesting and don't take a lot of time, so this will be useful for the exprience and for the other people too
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  • Profile picture of the author Melisasmith
    Yes, Offcourse. It helps to create a better testimonial.
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