Made my first 1k writing copy. What's next?

8 replies
Hey Warriors,

Made my first 1k on Upwork writing landing pages and amazon listing descriptions for cheap... Just to build my profile reputation.

I aim to focus on email copywriting, email sequences, broadcast emails etc.

I've invested in one of the UK's best copywriters course with the money from Upwork.

And now I'm implementing the content and grinding away.

The problem I have now is not getting feedback on the email copy I'm writing.

Should I just go ahead and pitch to clients? Or try working as a copy cub?

What would you do?

Thanks
#copy #made #writing
  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    How long did it take you to earn 1k on Upwork?

    Are you 'grinding away' just for practice now? Why aren't you responding to copywrite gigs on Upwork to get feedback AND get practice?

    if you did some work on Upwork and have an excellent rating - you don't have to work 'for cheap' there any longer and it's a good place to practice writing on totally different topics.


    Aside from that - of course I'd pitch to clients....might as well be paid while you are improving your skills.
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  • Profile picture of the author amit ramdasi
    Getting a client on upwork for the first time, if you have done it then it have created the reputation you require for getting the new clients.

    Go ahead and get some more clients for the work you mainly want to focus and build more reputation, write some best copies.

    Don't think too much and pitch directly to clients
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  • Profile picture of the author Monetize
    1K is a GREAT start but not enough to rest on your laurels.
    Keep on doing more but do not sell your services for cheap
    because people don't mind paying for quality work. Figure
    out where your copywritng skills will be the most profitable
    and do that.
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  • Profile picture of the author greatwriter
    Why not do both at the same time?
    Pitch your own clients, while working as
    a copy cub.
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  • I think us here copywriters prefer to write our esteemed copy for our chosen clients.

    The good people who we relish writing for.

    But you need a phenomenal pitch -

    Without it sounding like an oh so typical spiel - "me, me me", look, look, look how good I am, really I am - read these glorious over the top testimonials - all leading to a somewhat desperate, shouty screamy, needy, please, please please, like me, and maybe hire me by Friday at the latest - cos I've bunged in a completely see through false scarcity line.


    How do you write a Phenomenal Pitch then?

    By making it as irresistible as possible.

    Have real empathy, let the potential clients realise you genuinely care about them - and be the trusted, proven and likeable expert.

    Superbly resolving any objections they may have.

    Remember everybody on planet earth buys everything on emotion and justifies intellectually.

    So tune into their emotions and logic - it's 90% about how you understand them and 10% about you - showing beyond a shadow of doubt - how'll you'll help solve their problems.

    (e.g.hit the emotional pains - the frustrations, upsets and discomforts - how bad it is, how worse it can get, the awful ongoing effect is has. And the huge relief when it's all resolved. With the perfect analytical sense it made to deal with it.
    Worth noting - every client wants more customers - without massive effort - and bigger revenues and consistently higher profits - and you know how this is done).

    Keep crafting this epic - by writing, scripting and testing until it becomes a bit of a masterpiece.


    Then what?

    Pick your targets and prospect X times a day - every day - no excuses, no less than you ought, no skiving off (you must keep at it - so you'll always, always have clients lined up).


    Contact them directly by letter, email or phone.


    No great need to follow up - because if they're highly emotionally and logically impressed.

    They'll call you.


    Steve


    P.S. Will you get lots of rejections - no replies - despite your best and ever improving efforts? Of course you will. Just accept it and move on.

    Some prospects may not have a problem you can fix.

    Many automatically bin, delete or hang up when it appears to be a "pitch" - helpful hint - don't make it look or sound like a sales patter.

    For others - you're an uninvited stranger - they incorrectly assume without checking - that you only want to sell them something they don't want or need - disrupting their time and interrupting their busy day - ironically full of dilemmas you could help solve.

    But they'll absolutely refuse to accept it - with every excuse imaginable and many beyond belief - in essence - they feel - "we'll battle on, put up with the pain, never, ever see the sense in getting the right help - and sink or maybe swim without you - thank you very much!"

    They are rarely worth your valuable time trying to persuade them otherwise. Yes, you can spend ages handling the mountains of objections. But even then they often become constantly "difficult" clients.

    And there are so many ace clients out there - just waiting for you to find them.

    So, if you relentlessly keep prospecting you'll always get the people you want - queuing up asking and paying for your help.
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  • Profile picture of the author 1Bryan
    My first copywriting gig paid more than $ 1000. Seek out businesses that make coin per sale and only pitch them It's really that simple. It's hard but simple. A pizzeria can only pay a few hundred bucks. No matter how good you are. Unless it's Papa John' haha. Seek out the right target market first. THEN you pitch. Plenty of industries where $ 2,000 to $ 5,000 is "entry level"... find THEM.
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    • Profile picture of the author DABK
      Mortgage brokers in my area make $4,000 to $15,000/sale, $5000 average.

      Wedding dress store sell a dress between $200 and 15,000. Low mid-range start go from $1500 to 4000.

      Divorce attorneys charge 250 to 300/hour.

      Architects charge 2000 and up for plans for one house; 2000 gets you plans they made for someone else and adjusted for you.

      Commercial real estate appraisers charge from 1600/job.


      Real estate agents get 2.5% of the sale of a house. Average house sale price here is $237,000, so that's a bit over $5900/sale.


      Web designers seem to charge between $500 and $8000... most in the $1000 to 3500 range.

      Just some ideas.



      Originally Posted by 1Bryan View Post

      My first copywriting gig paid more than $ 1000. Seek out businesses that make coin per sale and only pitch them It's really that simple. It's hard but simple. A pizzeria can only pay a few hundred bucks. No matter how good you are. Unless it's Papa John' haha. Seek out the right target market first. THEN you pitch. Plenty of industries where $ 2,000 to $ 5,000 is "entry level"... find THEM.
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