How can I write follow-up e-mails that sell?

14 replies
I was wondering, about the e-mails I put into my autoresponder in order to follow up with my opt-ins. How can I write a good e-mail that gives me a better chance of making a sale?

Because I don't want to scare prospects away (i.e. unsubscribe).

If someone could tell me of a good book or course about this subject I'd really apreciate it!
=)
#emails #followup #sell #write
  • Profile picture of the author Raydal
    I have a course and software that addresses this issue.
    You can see my signature for the link.

    -Ray Edwards
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    The most powerful and concentrated copywriting training online today bar none! Autoresponder Writing Email SECRETS
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    • Profile picture of the author Aiarashi
      Originally Posted by Raydal View Post

      I have a course and software that addresses this issue.
      You can see my signature for the link.

      -Ray Edwards
      Thanks, I'll take a look at your offer.
      ^^
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      Internet (Marketing) is Serious Business
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    • Profile picture of the author TK1
      Originally Posted by Raydal View Post

      I have a course and software that addresses this issue.
      You can see my signature for the link.

      -Ray Edwards
      Nice one!

      It's all about content, and what I tell people in my newsletter coaching:

      Don't worry about how well your e-mails sound etc. but worry about how much does it engage people to reply and take action with you?

      Cause active people that build a relationship on your list mean money!

      TK
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  • Profile picture of the author John_S
    I think the real question is how do you set up your [cough] marketing system so your initial opt-in preps responders for a sale?

    Too much of this gets short circuited because nothing was developed to aid the next stage in a sales cycle. In fact, in most cases, Free is often used to avoid the whole issue of making a sale or selling.

    So, when it comes time to convert free loaders to buyers, the whole thing crashes and burns.

    It's not for lack of software for shoving out the next email. It is due to sabotaging the sales process by avoiding the issue of sales until it is far too late.

    Free is an okay sales approach. Free makes for a disastrous "I don't know what I'm doing and I already gave away the store ...so now what?!" approach.
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    • Profile picture of the author Bill Jeffels
      Depending on what you're selling. Make sure each e-mail is providing your prospect with some kind of information or benefit that they are looking to get.

      But don't give away the "Big Secret" that's going to make them healthier, wealthier, wiser.

      Save that for what your selling. Just give your prospects a little taste in each e-mail of what the big benefit is. And that's buying your product or service.

      Take care,

      Bill Jeffels



      .
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      • Profile picture of the author Aiarashi
        Originally Posted by Bill Jeffels View Post

        Depending on what you're selling. Make sure each e-mail is providing your prospect with some kind of information or benefit that they are looking to get.

        But don't give away the "Big Secret" that's going to make them healthier, wealthier, wiser.

        Save that for what your selling. Just give your prospects a little taste in each e-mail of what the big benefit is. And that's buying your product or service.

        Take care,

        Bill Jeffels
        That sounds good, do you think I should give testimonials in the e-mails? Or just the info?

        I think the e-mails can be like the sales letter just broken down into different segments of it, that's what I think, but is there a best way to do that? Or is it completely different from the sales letter?
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    • Profile picture of the author Aiarashi
      Originally Posted by John_S View Post

      I think the real question is how do you set up your [cough] marketing system so your initial opt-in preps responders for a sale?

      Too much of this gets short circuited because nothing was developed to aid the next stage in a sales cycle. In fact, in most cases, Free is often used to avoid the whole issue of making a sale or selling.

      So, when it comes time to convert free loaders to buyers, the whole thing crashes and burns.

      It's not for lack of software for shoving out the next email. It is due to sabotaging the sales process by avoiding the issue of sales until it is far too late.

      Free is an okay sales approach. Free makes for a disastrous "I don't know what I'm doing and I already gave away the store ...so now what?!" approach.
      You're right, you see I was thinking maybe I should redirect them to the sales page after they have opted in, and use the e-mails to direct them back to the sales page.

      But of course I want to give value and content in the e-mails, but how much should I give, what kind of vocabulary would be good to use with prospects so that they feel more like going through the link and possibly buy?
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  • Profile picture of the author wayne60618
    Cheapy,

    While you may want to include elements of the sales page in your emails, you might want to think about your emails as preselling tools while your sales page will do the selling. Paul Hancox offers a good ebook on preselling if you're struggling with the process. It is not an email specific book, but rather will help you understand the foundations of preselling - and email is covered a bit.

    Generally speaking, you will be successful if you do a few of the following types of emails which you can mix and match as you plan out a sequence:

    - Your presell story
    - A customers presell story
    - How to info
    - Offer focused emails
    - Some entertaining and personality revealing stories designed to help you connect with the target market
    - Big news in the market - tie it to your product
    - market celebrity info or gossip

    This is some basic stuff, but if you stop to think about it I am sure you can come up with a lot of content just based on those themes.

    Regards,

    Wayne
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    • Profile picture of the author Stephen Dean
      If your list is being built on a sales page or for the purpose of selling a specific product...

      ...you want to make the sale as close to sign up as possible. So I'd make sure to give a chance to buy on the thank you page (directly after sign up) and your first flurry of emails should be to get people back to the sales page.

      Every email should contain a link to either the sales page or something that could lead to the sales page.

      I like to tease the reader with tidbits and facts from the sales letter, so the reader has to click the link and look at the sales letter to find the answer.

      For example, from the post Affiliate Copy 102 on my blog:


      Did you see how much money he made in June?

      Use impressive but vague claims to peak their curiosity. If the sales page uses any form of proof, like screenshots or videos showing income claims, build that up in the email… but tease them by leaving out how much money was actually made. They’ll have to click your affiliate link to find out.

      You’ve GOT to read Dan’s story, it’s midway down the page.

      In this case, “Dan” could be the name of someone whose testimonial is on the sales page.

      Asking you readers to check out specific testimonials on the sales page can get them highly engaged. Especially because testimonials can be so powerful.

      Is she seriously giving this away for free?

      Most sales pages include bonuses, right? You can write an email teasing them about a free bonus that comes with the product.

      Again, don’t actually say what the bonus is so that they have to click over to find out. But you can tease them by saying how much the bonus is worth.
      This WILL cause some people to unsubscribe. But so what? It's better to build a list of buyers than tire-kickers.

      Hope that helps.

      Cheers,
      Stephen Dean
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      • Profile picture of the author Aiarashi
        Originally Posted by Stephen Dean View Post

        If your list is being built on a sales page or for the purpose of selling a specific product...

        ...you want to make the sale as close to sign up as possible. So I'd make sure to give a chance to buy on the thank you page (directly after sign up) and your first flurry of emails should be to get people back to the sales page.

        Every email should contain a link to either the sales page or something that could lead to the sales page.

        I like to tease the reader with tidbits and facts from the sales letter, so the reader has to click the link and look at the sales letter to find the answer.
        That's actually something I was thinking on doing. Mainly because I want to use it for Affiliate Marketing as well, and since there are some dirty marketers that get your affiliates and then use their own affiliate link so they keep all the sale, I thought if I got their e-mails first and then redirected them to the affiliate link that'd do it.
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    • Profile picture of the author Paul Hancox
      Originally Posted by wayne60618 View Post

      While you may want to include elements of the sales page in your emails, you might want to think about your emails as preselling tools while your sales page will do the selling. Paul Hancox offers a good ebook on preselling if you're struggling with the process. It is not an email specific book, but rather will help you understand the foundations of preselling - and email is covered a bit.
      Thanks for mentioning my product, Wayne.

      @Cheapy S... Wayne is absolutely right. Use your email to PRE-sell, rather than sell.

      When they signed up for your email, I'm guessing they didn't want to be sent regular PITCHES... right?

      On the other hand, they probably wanted to be informed and entertained.

      So inform them, entertain them... and use those frames to move them gradually towards a position where they are ready to buy.

      If someone could tell me of a good book or course about this subject I'd really apreciate it!
      As Wayne said, Presell Mastery shows you how to presell in all kinds of different formats, including email. The report is 147 pages, so as you can imagine, I can't show you how to do this in a simple forum post
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      Multiply your sales and opt-ins using pre-selling techniques your competitors don't know about.
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    • Profile picture of the author Aiarashi
      Originally Posted by wayne60618 View Post

      Generally speaking, you will be successful if you do a few of the following types of emails which you can mix and match as you plan out a sequence:

      - Your presell story
      - A customers presell story
      - How to info
      - Offer focused emails
      - Some entertaining and personality revealing stories designed to help you connect with the target market
      - Big news in the market - tie it to your product
      - market celebrity info or gossip

      This is some basic stuff, but if you stop to think about it I am sure you can come up with a lot of content just based on those themes.

      Regards,

      Wayne
      Those are some good points for the e-mails. Thanks.
      =)
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      Internet (Marketing) is Serious Business
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  • Profile picture of the author Joel_Cowen
    One thing I did that really helped me was subscribe to top marketer's lists and see what their doing. They have spent the time and money "perfecting" their emails, why not model yours after them and learn from their mistakes.
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  • Profile picture of the author Nicola Lane
    Definately get Paul Hancox WSO - now, before he puts the price up!
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    I like to keep an open mind, but not so open that my brains fall out

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