Can ANYONE become a GREAT copywriter?? Or are they actually a ELITE breed?

58 replies
Hello warriors,

I am halfway through john Carlton's course, i am STUNNED by what i have heard so far, Everywhere i look i can see good/bad advertising, i am seeing things with a very unique perspective. I am seriously thinking about taking copywriting VERY seriously and honing my skills. The whole idea of "romancing" with your readers and getting them to do what you want them to do just excites me.

The question on my mind is, What is a good way to get started, i mean, how do you start "training" yourself as a good copywriter. How can i start? I mean i did telesales for a year almost? It was a Australian process "bargain breaks" if you live in Australia you've probably gotten the following call:

".....you can get 10 nights of accommodation in 3 to 5 star hotels anywhere in Australia for just $109....."


I made a decent amount of sales, talked to a LOT of different people... we would go through 400 numbers in a day. So yea.... I've got a good idea on how to deal with common objections... and some other stuff. So, i was just wondering if this is a thing that someone like me can peruse?

Thank you for your help.

Cheers,
kunal
#breed #copywriter #elite #great
  • Profile picture of the author Bruce Wedding
    I believe most can become ADEQUATE copywriters, but not elite. It is possible to follow a cookie-cutter formula and create adequate copy. But to create a super smooth flow, to empathize with your prospect completely and push the buttons that will incite a burning desire... most will never achieve that.
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    • Profile picture of the author Happy_Balance
      Originally Posted by Bruce Wedding View Post

      ...push the buttons that will incite a burning desire...
      • What about plain, straight-forward honesty and enthusiasm?
      • Can a genuine approach succeed, or do all 'great marketers' need to be button-pushers?
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      • Profile picture of the author Oxbloom
        Originally Posted by Happy_Balance View Post

        • What about plain, straight-forward honesty and enthusiasm?
        • Can a genuine approach succeed, or do all 'great marketers' need to be button-pushers?
        When you can push the buttons with straight-forward honesty and enthusiasm, it will be time for you to leave the temple.
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        • Profile picture of the author Happy_Balance
          Originally Posted by Oxbloom View Post

          When you can push the buttons with straight-forward honesty and enthusiasm, it will be time for you to leave the temple.
          Interesting
          Can I ask you to 'evaluate' something I wrote last night, it takes < 5 minutes.
          (If "yes" I'll send you a quick PM)
          Thanks
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          Every Day Is Fun! :)

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          • Profile picture of the author Oxbloom
            Originally Posted by Happy_Balance View Post

            Interesting
            Can I ask you to 'evaluate' something I wrote last night, it takes < 5 minutes.
            (If "yes" I'll send you a quick PM)
            Thanks
            You're welcome to send it. I don't promise I'll be able to take a look until tonight, though.
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        • Profile picture of the author Kay King
          If copywriters are so "elit", they wouldn't make so many silly spelling mistakes.
          Why are there so many mistakes? "I meant to do that - I'm talking to the market in their language". They are selling to people with an aversion to the letter "e".
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    • Profile picture of the author Rexibit
      Originally Posted by Bruce Wedding View Post

      I believe most can become ADEQUATE copywriters, but not elite. It is possible to follow a cookie-cutter formula and create adequate copy. But to create a super smooth flow, to empathize with your prospect completely and push the buttons that will incite a burning desire... most will never achieve that.
      Anyone can become anything they want to be, it's just that most won't; either because of social norms, barriers to entry, they don't have the drive to see patterns and adapt, or they're just lazy. Saying that all the majority of people can achieve is adequacy in something is a logical fallacy based off of common human behavior.

      Anyhoo, enough with pointing that out - onto my actual point

      Copywriting is just a spin on a type of marketing. All marketing has a pattern. Once you are able to see that pattern, then you're able to "bend it to your will" so-to-speak.

      To find that pattern, you have to have develop the ability to see it in whatever niche you're entering and then anticipate how your words will trigger the desired response in the reader. Since most people are either ignorant of that foresight or just don't care to develop it, there aren't that many great copywriters.

      Still, anyone can develop that skill, they just have to have the drive.
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  • Profile picture of the author travlinguy
    Originally Posted by rammonster View Post

    The question on my mind is, What is a good way to get started, i mean, how do you start "training" yourself as a good copywriter.


    Understand that any writer doesn't simply turn it on and off. Serious writers are always writers. This isn't meant to be offensive but look at your post. You've used lower case letters where upper are appropriate. Periods were question marks are warranted. There's more but you get it.

    Sure, there are copywriting courses and mentors out there that will tell you this stuff doesn't matter. That's BS. So why do they say it? Because they'd get no takers for their training if they told the truth about the basics of writing. Consequently, I see copy for review on this forum that looks more like a sales oriented text message than a sales letter.

    When you hold yourself out as a writer you need to realize that people will notice stuff like that. People will say that grammar and spelling are probably not as important in the fast-buck IM writing arena. I'd agree. Many in this audience have no clue about grammar, spelling and the rest so it probably doesn't matter much in IM.

    But for me, it's about always learning and improving. And that means always putting out your best stuff whether it's a post here or a $5000 letter for a client. I see it like this: doing it right is never going to hurt you but doing it wrong will from time to time. The result is lost sales. Good luck.
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  • Profile picture of the author rammonster
    Umm... i write way better on my keyboard....always have. My new laptop's buttons are too close together and dont "sink" as much, so im still getting used to typing on it.

    But yea, i guess my grammar is kinda blunt. I'll definitely work on writing better. Really appreciate the input, its good to know your weak points, At least you know what you need to work on.

    Cheers,
    kunal
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    • Profile picture of the author perryny
      "Can ANYONE become a GREAT __________?? Or are they actually a ELITE breed?"

      _______________ = copywriter / photographer / chef / musician / web designer / salesman / baseball player / painter / marketer / architect / fashion designer / computer programmer / etc., etc.

      With a strong enough desire + lots of study and plenty of practice, just about anyone has the ability to become great at just about anything.

      There are those of course that have natural talent. If they're fortunate enough to discover that talent and have a strong desire to pursue the field, then they will have a shorter path towards becoming the "Elite".

      But you do not need natural talent to become "Great" at anything. Desire, determination, practice and an inability to give up will get you there.


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      • Profile picture of the author summer1217
        Most of all, really, write on something that are of interests to you. I can't imagine some people writing about a topic they have no interest on at all! You either could be wasting your time and write with less quality. Just my one cent. :-)
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  • Profile picture of the author perryny
    Originally Posted by Ken_Caudill View Post

    As I've said before, if you can't write, don't.

    Everyone will be happier.
    Yup... might as well not even try...

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    • Profile picture of the author perryny
      So, is Kunal supposed to learn, practice and try to improve? Or is he supposed to just give up because someone said he can't?

      And when is his copy good enough to subject people to it?
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      • Profile picture of the author rammonster
        Originally Posted by perryny View Post

        So, is Kunal supposed to learn, practice and try to improve? Or is he supposed to just give up because someone said he can't?

        And when is his copy good enough to subject people to it?
        Hahahah... i wasn't going to give up just because one person says i am no good. I've learned to learn from my mistakes, do better. I am a high school dropout. Everyone in my family said i wouldn't have a life. Now i make enough to shut them up. I am pursuing copywriting, if people doubt me, i use it as motivation. Nothing is more satisfying than proving those people wrong, i use it to make myself "angry" and FORCE myself to do better.

        Cheers,
        kunal
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        • Profile picture of the author wrcato2
          Originally Posted by rammonster View Post

          Hahahah... i wasn't going to give up just because one person says i am no good. I've learned to learn from my mistakes, do better. I am a high school dropout. Everyone in my family said i wouldn't have a life. Now i make enough to shut them up. I am pursuing copywriting, if people doubt me, i use it as motivation. Nothing is more satisfying than proving those people wrong, i use it to make myself "angry" and FORCE myself to do better.

          Cheers,
          kunal
          My dad always made a qoute "If at first you don't succeed... try, try again".

          You can do it!

          If you want to write great copy study the masters. One thing I have noticed about master copy writers, they all suck in part, but they master their part.
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      • Profile picture of the author Oxbloom
        Anyone can become a very effective copywriter, assuming he can write.

        Don't worry about "great." It's pretty subjective to begin with. But more importantly, in this line of work, it's probably not worth the extra effort it will take to make the leap.

        Once you're competent, your income is pretty much only limited by your own ambition.

        Yes, you can theoretically become the next Gary Bencivenga, and pull down five million dollars on a single letter.

        Or, you could settle for being the next guy-who-read-Carlton's-whole-guide-and-did-what-it-said. Then, instead of spending twenty more years getting Bencivenganly good, spend that time promoting things. You'll get a little better and a lot richer along the way.
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      • Profile picture of the author perryny
        Originally Posted by Ken_Caudill View Post

        I would advise him to learn basic composition, experiment with selling products for his own profit, and hang out his shingle once his products start to sell. A good transition page to an affiliate product can make a writer more money than writing a sales page for a client.

        Writing for yourself gives you the opportunity to experiment and find out what works. When you can write copy that consistently sells, you're a direct sales copywriter.

        Sure, there are people with sales talent who can write good sales copy containing structural mistakes. They are few and far between and usually selling their own products. The smart ones hire editors to fix them.

        You can't call yourself a professional if you don't understand basics.
        All sound, solid advice. Just very different from "if you can't write, don't."
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  • >CAN< yes, >WILL< no. There are still barriers to entry. People are lazy. It takes study and practice.

    I am stunned on an almost daily basis by the volume of bad grammar and misspellings of common words, to say nothing of ignorance of persuasive writing techniques.
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  • Profile picture of the author Don Halbert
    I'm pretty special...I think.

    "No one thinks about you as much as you do. For example I'm not thinking about you right now but I bet you are."
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    "Someone is sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago."
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  • Profile picture of the author Rezbi
    Bencivenga became great after 10 years. Doesn't sound like a natural to me.

    He worked hard to get there. And so can others.
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  • Profile picture of the author ARSuarez
    You know, for some reason... This all makes me think there should be an actual
    copywriting bootcamp.

    Like, an intense one. They have you running 5 miles without stopping while thinking up between 100 and 250 headlines for male potency supplement. And then, they have you write a lead for your letter while doing pushups, one end of the pen between your teeth.

    The fastest way to become a physically fit AND competent copywriter. Just saying.

    Regards,

    Angel
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    • Profile picture of the author Rezbi
      Originally Posted by ARSuarez View Post

      You know, for some reason... This all makes me think there should be an actual
      copywriting bootcamp.

      Like, an intense one. They have you running 5 miles without stopping while thinking up between 100 and 250 headlines for male potency supplement. And then, they have you write a lead for your letter while doing pushups, one end of the pen between your teeth.

      The fastest way to become a physically fit AND competent copywriter. Just saying.

      Regards,

      Angel
      Good idea. Let's do it.

      Who's in?
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      • Profile picture of the author ARSuarez
        Originally Posted by Rezbi View Post

        Good idea. Let's do it.

        Who's in?
        Let's do this Rezbi.

        We'll probably end up violating some laws of ethical treatment of other human beings.

        Personally, I drink 12 raw eggs every morning before running 4 miles with The Collier Letter Book, everything by Caples, Hopkins, Breakthrough Advertising by Schwartz, and my entire copy of The Quick-Start Copy System tied to my back.

        And that's only after spending 3 years writing out - by longhand - the most successful ads I could find. I did it until my fingers literally bled and I had to go to a hospital.

        The Doctor there would not treat me until I could recite the entire Halbert coat-of-arms letter and Sackheim "Do You Make These Mistakes" ad word for word while in extreme pain.

        (As an aside to the OP... this isn't all just ranting and raving on my part. This is meant to show that with work and dedicated effort, you can become very good. Being a great copywriter isn't difficult - it's tedious. For some more than others).

        Regards,

        Angel
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        • Profile picture of the author Rezbi
          Originally Posted by ARSuarez View Post

          Let's do this Rezbi.

          We'll probably end up violating some laws of ethical treatment of other human beings.

          Personally, I drink 12 raw eggs every morning before running 4 miles with The Collier Letter Book, everything by Caples, Hopkins, Breakthrough Advertising by Schwartz, and my entire copy of The Quick-Start Copy System tied to my back.

          And that's only after spending 3 years writing out - by longhand - the most successful ads I could find. I did it until my fingers literally bled and I had to go to a hospital.

          The Doctor there would not treat me until I could recite the entire Halbert coat-of-arms letter and Sackheim "Do You Make These Mistakes" ad word for word while in extreme pain.

          (As an aside to the OP... this isn't all just ranting and raving on my part. This is meant to show that with work and dedicated effort, you can become very good. Being a great copywriter isn't difficult - it's tedious. For some more than others).

          Regards,

          Angel
          Uhuh. I see.

          So you're still learning, huh?

          Let me know when you've got a few more years behind you and you're actually eating a copy of each of those books a day instead of just hanging them off your back, along with the eggs. Then we'll talk.

          You know what they say: You are what you eat.
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          • Profile picture of the author ARSuarez
            Originally Posted by Rezbi View Post

            Uhuh. I see.

            So you're still learning, huh?

            Let me know when you've got a few more years behind you and you're actually eating a copy of each of those books a day instead of just hanging them off your back, along with the eggs. Then we'll talk.

            You know what they say: You are what you eat.
            You're a real man, Rezbi.

            Sometimes, I burn the books and pour the ashes into my OJ.

            Does that qualify?
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  • Profile picture of the author mindmarketing
    How do you get to Carnegie Hall?

    Natural ability supplemented with a hell of a lot of practice.
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  • Profile picture of the author danny9
    According to Malcolm Gladwell, all you need to do is practice for 10,000 hours.

    Anyone who can find the focus and desire to stick with copywriting for that long can be great. Somehow, I believe it's true.
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    • Profile picture of the author Oxbloom
      Originally Posted by danny9 View Post

      According to Malcolm Gladwell, all you need to do is practice for 10,000 hours.

      Anyone who can find the focus and desire to stick with copywriting for that long can be great. Somehow, I believe it's true.
      I submit that this is *not* the premise of Gladwell's book.

      His (actually, Ericsson's) "10,000 hour rule" is meant to be a benchmark...an amount of practice or participation it takes someone to become successful at some complex and competitive field of endeavor. If that's sufficient to prove "greatness," then so be it. But I feel his premise applies to a .200 hitting shortstop with a five year career in the majors as much as it applies to Albert Pujols.

      Naturally, he cherry picks famous, world class examples, because that sells books better than the study of the really, REALLY competent tax accountant would.

      But I suggest this:

      A whole lot of practice AND a whole lot of talent = greatness.

      Either a whole lot of practice OR a whole lot of talent, but not both = competence.

      Anything less = incompetence or failure.

      I feel like I know, including online acquaintances, about a half dozen people who I sincerely believe could become Bencivengas with ten solid years' practice.

      I feel like I know a whole lot more who couldn't.

      Maybe we're just referring to different things when we say the word "great."

      (Ed. note: I say this as a .200 hitting shortstop in the world of professional writing.)
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  • Profile picture of the author Victor Edson
    If copywriters are so elit, they wouldn't make so many silly spelling mistakes.

    Any troll on Youtube could tell you tat.
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    • Profile picture of the author mindmarketing
      If SEO guys were so elite we'd all be ranked #1 right now.

      Any troll on YouTube could tell you that.
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    • Profile picture of the author Bruce Wedding
      Originally Posted by Victor Edson View Post

      If copywriters are so elit(sic), they wouldn't make so many silly spelling mistakes.

      Any troll on Youtube could tell you tat(sic).
      Too funny.
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  • Profile picture of the author The Copy Nazi
    Banned
    Gary Halbert said it was easy to write salesletters. Like this -


    1. Say something that gets attention ("Ex-hooker blackmails internet marketing guru into giving her his push-button system that makes her a millionaire in seven days")



    2. Tell them why they should be interested ("Dude...you can quit your job at McDonalds and be swanning around Miami in a Rolls-Royce in no time flat. Would I lie?")


    3. Tell them why they should believe what you are saying is true ("Here are all my Clickbank and PayPal earnings shots Dude. I swear they're not shopped")



    4. Prove it is true ("Don't believe me? OK here's shots of my superyacht, my Maserati, my mansion and my supermodel girlfriend")



    5. Itemize and describe all benefits ("Do no work. Just lie on the beach all day and you're a millionaire")



    6. Tell the moron how to order ("Click that button")



    7. Tell him to order now or he'll miss out - 'cause the page is definitely coming down soon and is limited to 500 sales ("Dude - would I lie?)
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    • Profile picture of the author Dexx
      Originally Posted by The Copy Nazi View Post

      Gary Halbert said it was easy to write salesletters. Like this -


      1. Say something that gets attention ("Ex-hooker blackmails internet marketing guru into giving her his push-button system that makes her a millionaire in seven days")
      Is it sad that headline makes me wish there was more to read? lol

      Sounds like a great story to be heard! (with JC and others discuss as being the key to a successful sales letter)


      To the original poster: "Can anyone become a great copywriter?"

      Answer: John Carlton has devoted 30+ years to becoming a "great copywriter," the question is are you willing to do the same? Then you have your answer.

      Tiger Woods didn't just pick up a golf club one day and start swingin' ...

      ~Dexx
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      • Profile picture of the author rammonster
        Originally Posted by Dexx View Post

        To the original poster: "Can anyone become a great copywriter?"

        Answer: John Carlton has devoted 30+ years to becoming a "great copywriter," the question is are you willing to do the same? Then you have your answer.

        Tiger Woods didn't just pick up a golf club one day and start swingin' ...

        ~Dexx
        My gaming team had been dying to go pro for 8 years. we practiced together for 8 hours a day perfecting our skills. Finally, we've got a local cell phone company to sponsor our team. So yea, if dedication is all it takes. I am ready to work as hard as i can and get really good at this. I mean i can lock myself up in my room for hours like a crazy artist. I once played counter strike for 24 hours straight until i could figure out why i wasn't able get consistent head shots and now i am so good that people actually think i cheat. I'm not bragging or anything but, yea...if i set my focus towards something, i go crazy with it. Its like a obsession, its this insane itch that has to be scratched.

        Cheers,
        kunal
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      • Profile picture of the author The Copy Nazi
        Banned
        Originally Posted by Dexx View Post


        Tiger Woods didn't just pick up a golf club one day and start swingin' ...

        ~Dexx
        I heard he picked up something else and started swingin'
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Ten
    Yes. Anyone can become great and elite at perhaps anything... it might just take education, patience, practice, learning, and perseverance. It can be done though, it seems to me.
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  • Profile picture of the author danielsteven
    I believe anyone can become elite if they put in the time...the problem is most won't
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  • Profile picture of the author amo992
    It takes 10,000 hours to become elite in any skill you want to master.
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  • Profile picture of the author davechan
    I find that the best copy writing really comes from emotion. If you can feel what you are writing about, it comes across in the copy. Eloquence aside, the people who read your writings are the ones who are the best judges of the authenticity and the emotions evoked. So, in my opinion, speak from the heart and it will come across as authentic and trustworthy ... which, in my mind, translates to good copy writing.
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    • Profile picture of the author Rezbi
      Originally Posted by davechan View Post

      I find that the best copy writing really comes from emotion. If you can feel what you are writing about, it comes across in the copy. Eloquence aside, the people who read your writings are the ones who are the best judges of the authenticity and the emotions evoked. So, in my opinion, speak from the heart and it will come across as authentic and trustworthy ... which, in my mind, translates to good copy writing.
      Not really. Good copywriting is the type that makes your cash register ring.

      That is the ONLY thing that matters.
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      • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
        Originally Posted by Rezbi View Post

        Not really. Good copywriting is the type that makes your cash register ring.

        That is the ONLY thing that matters.
        Rezbi, here's a quote from John Carlton..."If your emotions are in lock-down... from a bad childhood, or from a misguided sense of what it takes to be a man or woman (or leader or executive or parent or biz owner or anything else)... you will never be able to get into another person's head.

        And you'll never find that sweet spot of need and connection that makes great literature great... and great sales copy a license to print money."

        Full blog post here How To Be A Sap. | The Marketing Rebel RANT

        Best,
        Ewen
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        • Profile picture of the author Rezbi
          Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

          Rezbi, here's a quote from John Carlton..."If your emotions are in lock-down... from a bad childhood, or from a misguided sense of what it takes to be a man or woman (or leader or executive or parent or biz owner or anything else)... you will never be able to get into another person's head.

          And you'll never find that sweet spot of need and connection that makes great literature great... and great sales copy a license to print money."

          Full blog post here How To Be A Sap. | The Marketing Rebel RANT

          Best,
          Ewen
          You missed my point.
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  • Profile picture of the author SundayForever
    Everything is difficult at the beginning! You need to make your mind and your heart to do it! I think it could be easy after a long try!
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    • Profile picture of the author Kevin Rogers
      The best comment yet, in my opinion, is that "greatness" is subjective, so striving for it is a frail wish.

      Also have to agree with the comment that you're always being judged by what and HOW you write - especially here, where future clients lurk much more than you think.

      Your grammar and punctuation is atrocious, dude. Believe me, I make plenty of mistakes (probably make a few in this post) but you've at least got to go back and cap the "i" if you want to be taken seriously as a writer.

      With that out of the way... you've got some things going for you that make me believe you could do well - if you're serious:

      1. You take criticism well. A tough skin is at least as important (if not more) as natural writing ability. People who get pissy at the chirping of their peers will have their heads split clean open when a client calls screaming that your crap copy is losing him "a hundred thousand dollars an hour!" (No matter how untrue it is, it's a gut twist for any writer who cares about what they do)

      2. You have some "in the trenches" sales experience. If you took the telemarketing gig seriously at all, and got jacked over turning a stiff prospect into a lap cat to close the deal, then you just may be a real closer. That will get you further along than a masters in English every time.

      Now, just to let you know that I'm speaking from experience here, I've taught John Carlton's SWS one-on-one in the mentoring sessions to over 100 students. Is it the "end all be all" course?

      No... none of them are.

      But I do believe it's the best course for quickly learning the fundamental elements of a strong ad from a proven master.

      I also like what you said in your OP about how the course has awakened you to all the good and bad ads we encounter every day. It is damned exciting to suddenly wear those goggles, isn't it?

      You asked how to become "great" at persuading readers to take action...

      Here's what I know it takes to become a successful freelance copywriter (based on the handful of copywriters I know who qualify for the "greatness" title):

      1. You have to LOVE writing.

      Sure, you can hate writing and still put together a "good enough" ad for yourself, but you'll never find your groove as a pro if the act of writing doesn't satisfy you viscerally. Why torture yourself like that?

      2. Those who get good, tend to get good fast.

      Now, before everyone starts citing examples to the contrary, let me say that when Bencivenga says his ads were "horrible" for years, consider his standard. (Plus, he stayed employed, so it had to be at least passable.) The difference is, with the Internet, we get to test our stuff immediately now, so if you suck, you'll know quickly and if you're good, you'll get even better quickly.

      Point is... if you're still posting "can I be great at this" threads here a year from now; hang it up.

      3. "Making it" as a freelancer requires much more than the ability to convert a sale.

      Getting results for your clients is only the first prerequisite. The real job is client management. Brutal grind learning the steps to that dance. If you survive it, you can have a relatively peaceful business life. But - if your sane - your immediate goal will be to move beyond client work.

      I'm fortunate to have great clients, but learning to filter out the ones I'm not a good match with (and achieving a level where I'm fortunate enough not to need them), took a good year off my life and all the hair from my head.

      Good news is, if you handle your business with class, own your mistakes and learn to be "The Adult in the Room" (greatest and most difficult lesson my mentors like Montello and Carlton ever taught me)... you will get to a place where partnering with your best clients just makes more sense for all parties.

      That's the stepping stone to real freedom. Until then, no matter how staggering your fees, you're still trading hours for dollars. Not the prize we're after.

      But I'm wandering out past the buoy now...

      The answer to your question is: Yes, you can be great! And the first step is capping your "i's".

      All the best,

      Kevin
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  • Profile picture of the author PLR Basket
    From the look of your post, I can tell that you're a stylish writer, so I would say you're halfway there...

    I think the best way to become a good copywriter is by studying material from other great copywriters and do some reverse engineering.
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    • Profile picture of the author Rezbi
      Originally Posted by Chris Moore View Post

      From the look of your post, I can tell that you're a stylish writer, so I would say you're halfway there...

      I think the best way to become a good copywriter is by studying material from other great copywriters and do some reverse engineering.
      I strongly disagree.

      Why would you waste time trying to discover things for yourself when there are enough people out there who could teach you the ropes?

      Of course, if you've got time to waste and don't mind at least doubling your learning curve...
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  • Profile picture of the author MarketingMembers
    It's not for everybody. I learned that the things I'm good at I can do myself. The things that I'm not good at I now outsource. It's saved me tons of hassle and headache and has made my life much easier. I think everybody can be good at anything but how much time do you want to spend on just learning 1 thing. If your great at 99 things on your list of 100 then find someone else to do the 1 thing your not great at.

    If you enjoy doing it you will always become really good at it in a short time frame
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    • Profile picture of the author travlinguy
      Originally Posted by MarketingMembers View Post

      It's not for everybody. I learned that the things I'm good at I can do myself. The things that I'm not good at I now outsource. It's saved me tons of hassle and headache and has made my life much easier. I think everybody can be good at anything but how much time do you want to spend on just learning 1 thing. If your great at 99 things on your list of 100 then find someone else to do the 1 thing your not great at.

      If you enjoy doing it you will always become really good at it in a short time frame
      There is more truth and wisdom in this post than almost ALL of the others combined. Great observation. If more marketers understood and employed this simple concept they would be clearing a path for huge success.
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      • Profile picture of the author MarketingMembers
        Originally Posted by travlinguy View Post

        There is more truth and wisdom in this post than almost ALL of the others combined. Great observation. If more marketers understood and employed this simple concept they would be clearing a path for huge success.
        Thanks

        It's taken me a lot of time to learn that lesson.
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  • Profile picture of the author donhx
    Writing is craft like making fine furniture or wine. Anyone has the potential to learn it. It is not a gift from the gods or anything like that.

    Like all craft skills, writing may come easier to some. There will always be a few who excel. However, with study and diligence to the craft, anyone can become a journeyman writer over time.
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  • Profile picture of the author IMentreprenette
    Haven't read the rest of the forum but from your initial post. I say go for it! Your excitement and desire to learn and become a serious copywriter is seen from your post.

    Copywriting isn't for everyone, but if you showed a lot of interest in it then dive in, take risk, and learn. I'm sure it'll be an exciting journey for you! ^_^ You're the only person that knows what really peaks your interest (I mean for myself, I knew from the beginning that I have little interest in copywriting so I tend to outsource that part). Other parts of marketing excites me.

    Anyways, keep at it. I agree with donhx, it's a learned skill. Good luck on your future goals!
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    • Profile picture of the author rammonster
      Originally Posted by IMentreprenette View Post

      Haven't read the rest of the forum but from your initial post. I say go for it! I agree with Chris (post above me), you're a stylish writer.

      Your excitement, passion, and your desire to learn and become a serious copywriter is seen from your post. Dive in, take risk, and learn. I'm sure it'll be an exciting journey for you! ^_^
      Yep, At the moment...I am working on some mock sales letters and opt-in pages. And i have also offered to help a warrior fix his squeeze page and re-do it until he gets the desired conversions. I spent an hour just re-writing the headline. Now i understand why copywriters are so well paid and why the good ones charge the fee they do.

      Following John Carlton's advice i am writing everyday and reading novels and trying to find plot points and a LOT of other fun stuff. I just subscribed to a few direct mail lists to see how their advertising is... Every time i sit down to write and brainstorm ideas, it feels like my brain is bleeding, but when i come up with that one sentence that i know is a winner...it's totally worth it and it gets easier with practice... When i started writing first, it was a nightmare...I'd be staring at that blank screen for what seemed like hours, looking at that twitching vertical line and i eventually started having second thoughts. But again i remembered John's advice and turned myself into a "Snarling Beast" i got angry, i literally got angry at EVERYTHING... and then like magic, the words started flowing. It wasn't the best but it was good enough.

      I'll spend a few more months perfecting this and making myself better. I am a freelance deejay in real-life and i know the kind of rewards that come with talent and a good reputation... i work my own hours and charge what i feel like charging, its the best feeling ever and being able replicate that online with my copywriting, would just mean so much. Plus, copywriting is a fun thing to learn. For the first time i am actually enjoying writing.

      Cheers,
      kunal
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      • Profile picture of the author ARSuarez
        Originally Posted by rammonster View Post

        Following John Carlton's advice i am writing everyday and reading novels and trying to find plot points and a LOT of other fun stuff.
        Kunal,

        I would look up the author Jim Butcher's Livejournal (of The Dresden Files fame). He goes into detail about how to write novels/stories there.

        Surprisingly, a lot of what he says has great relation to copywriting.

        Creating an arch - the "opening" which sets the mood; the "high point" which gets the dominoes falling; the "climax" which brings it altogether - leaving the reader of fiction satisfied and breathing heavy, or the prospect, for us copywriters, with only one solution: to buy).

        Among other things. Like character creation (your protagonist - who's the hero of your copy/story?), the antagonist (who opposes and makes the life of the protagonist difficult? Lately, this has been 'the gurus' for IM).

        On and on.

        I really wish he'd write a book on the subject. It would be phenomenal.

        (By the way, he has said on his journal that he writes books to sell - the kinds of books people will devour and will fly off the shelves).

        Warmly,

        Angel
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  • Profile picture of the author jtunkelo
    If you don't have a knack for writing, it's going to be a hard time acquiring one.

    However. If you're intelligent and learn well, you probably can arrive at the 'a-ha!' where you realize how copywriting works, how products are sold, and can emulate it somewhat.

    In other words, you can hit the sweet spot and make some sales without becoming a pro copywriter.

    However, it IS a different matter to become a pro copywriter for hire. Then you do need to know how to write. It's good to differentiate between the two.
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