What Does Your Work Look Like When It's Delivered?

6 replies
I am learning the ropes of the copywriting world and one thing I am curious about is what you actually deliver to your customers.

Do you actually put together their website for them?

Do ALL copywriters work with graphics?

Is there anyone that could either link or PM me an example of what your work looks like when it's complete from your end?

Edited to add: I am only asking these questions because I recently had a Skype conversation with a gentleman who was thinking of hiring me. When we were discussing the project details, I informed him I only write copy since he was discussing how he wanted me to put his website together.

Honestly, I am not good with things like that... so I stick with what I know.

He seemed completely shocked that I didn't know how to put his website together. He said in his years of marketing, he never came across a copywriter who wouldn't do it for him.

I admit, I took a massive blow to my self-esteem from this because now I think I am not doing my job as a copywriter. Am I wrong to think that?
#delivered #work
  • Profile picture of the author Scott Murdaugh
    Generally just a word doc.

    Sometimes I'll work with a designer and help lay everything out.

    On rare occasion I'll take their graphics and lay it all out myself, usually because I can't find anyone I trust to outsource to or I want to get it over with or done a certain way.

    No, not all copywriters work with graphics. Some of the top guys I know, I'm talking BIG hitters, won't mess with graphics at all. IMO it's a handy skill to have.

    I'm decent with layout if a designer does the graphics (I'm horrible at design).

    You look at someone like Mr. Subtle (Mr. Subtle is for hire.), his graphics add a whole new dimension to his copy.

    Brian McLeod's stuff always looks great, I *think* he handles most of his graphics himself.

    But it's not a requirement.

    I'd learn it if you're naturally talented with graphics, or if it's interesting to you. But IMO, especially if you're just starting out, I'd focus on getting good at writing the copy.

    You can also search for some of Brent Turner's graphic packages to have some good, general purpose marketing graphics on-hand.

    Hope that helps!

    -Scott
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  • Profile picture of the author Wytnyt
    I've been meaning to ask this question too. Thanks for bringing this up.
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  • When I order content I just like to get it in a document that opens cleanly. Formatting/layout is all on my end.
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    • Originally Posted by AffordableMarketingLists View Post

      When I order content I just like to get it in a document that opens cleanly. Formatting/layout is all on my end.
      I deliver mine in Word (unless otherwise requested) with the proper fonts and sizes. I suggest positions for buttons and the graphics that I know they do have.

      I'm glad to see I am not as wrong as I thought I was.
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      • Sarah,

        For 28 years I've been writing copy. All delivered on Word (there was a time is was typed and before that with a quill and parchment - which was fun trying to put the red seal on the finished work).

        Anyway...

        I have absolutely no idea how to create a website.

        And even if graphics software was automatic - all you had to do was speak and everything was created perfectly.

        With me, it would still end up upside down, inside out - a completely wonky piece of nonsense.

        So just tell you're clients that you are a copywriter.

        Diplomatically say you are not an computer programer or a graphics designer.

        You concentrate all your skills on the one thing you are exceptional at.

        They'll understand when they see your outstanding copy.


        Steve


        P.S. You can always outsource the techie stuff.
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  • Profile picture of the author CabTenson
    Originally Posted by QualityCopywriting View Post

    He seemed completely shocked that I didn't know how to put his website together. He said in his years of marketing, he never came across a copywriter who wouldn't do it for him.

    I admit, I took a massive blow to my self-esteem from this because now I think I am not doing my job as a copywriter. Am I wrong to think that?
    "In all his years of marketing" probably means 6 months.

    Now you know that business owners, clients, etc aren't nearly as smart as they pretend to be. It is not normal to expect someone with the word "writer" in their job description to be a designer.
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