Your Guarantee is *Not* a Selling Point

15 replies
I saw another sales page yesterday with
the money-back guarantee stressed far
too much, even listed as a bullet point!!

Think about it for just a moment--
If you are buying a product, do you really
expect it to go wrong? Do you want
to go through the trouble of asking for
(or for some of you, demanding!) your
money back?

Personally, when I read this kind of
poorly written sales copy, it really raises
red flags of doubt. After all, why would
they need to advertise their guarantee
so much if their product is as good as
they want me to think it is?

A money-back guarantee is there for one
reason only, and that is to reduce the
person's risk when they are sitting on the
fence about the purchase... It gives them
that extra little push over because they
think they can "try" it and get their money
back if the product or service doesn't
deliver on the promise of the sales letter.

  • Stop touting your guarantee.
  • It is not for getting initial attention.
  • It is not a feature or a benefit.

Put it at the end of your salesletter
when you are driving traffic from strangers
that don't already know and trust you.
You'll see better results this way, because
it will improve the initial impression readers
get from reading your copy.

...I guarantee it.




(But don't take my word for it... Try this
and test the results for yourself!)
#guarantee #point #selling
  • Profile picture of the author NickN
    While I might agree with you in most instances, I found an exception to what you're saying.

    If you go to Kent Komae's blog and scroll down to the entry titled "The Value of a Great (and Creative) Guarantee," you'll see a pic of an ad that makes the guarantee the main selling point.

    Komae is Big League, so he obviously had good reason to make the guarantee the selling point. (But he also doesn't say how well this ad performed, other than it was "successful.")

    Interesting to think about, regardless.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jonathan 2.0
      Many times there are no “rules” just guidelines. Interesting post NickN.
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  • Profile picture of the author Pusateri
    If you are in a niche known for disappointing products, a bold, creative guarantee is absolutely a selling point.
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  • Profile picture of the author Winston Tenbrink
    I beg to differ, and I'm not going to be a prat by saying "it depends". The type of guarantees that work in headlines or deck copy are usually creative and highly powerful - for example, a double money back guarantee.

    But if the prospect has seen a lot of sales letters with a guarantee just like yours, and the market itself is brimming with the exact same guarantee, your prospect is not going to find it a selling point. It loses the risk aversion and they become empty words.

    Also, I've read quite a few online letters these days and they seem off the mark. Some tout their guarantee before even revealing the price, which really puzzles me. They don't even bother to remind the prospect about the guarantee after revealing the price.

    -Winston Tenbrink
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    • Profile picture of the author MikeTucker
      Originally Posted by Winston Tenbrink View Post

      Also, I've read quite a few online letters these days and they seem off the mark. Some tout their guarantee before even revealing the price, which really puzzles me. They don't even bother to remind the prospect about the guarantee after revealing the price.

      -Winston Tenbrink

      Somehow you summed up my entire
      post's point in one paragraph... maybe it's time
      for me to quit drinking, LOL...
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      • Profile picture of the author videolover7
        There are times when it's appropriate to put the guarantee in the headline. For example, when the guarantee is a product's point of differentiation (or USP).
        "One powerful way to get attention is to use a strong 'Guarantee' headline---particularly a guarantee that's unheard of in your category or industry. Such a headline grabs the readers attention because the guarantee is so different that it jumps right out at the reader." (Robert Boduch, Write Great Headlines Instantly)
        VL
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
    Totally depends on your market.

    Making blanket statements like that (in your headline alone) is just asinine.

    Look...

    You can put your guarantee wherever you want.

    And guess what?

    Your guarantee can come across as being insecure...

    ...or so confident in your offer that it makes people feel stupid for not taking action.

    DO NOT run away from using a guarantee to lead into your copy.

    Just do it right.

    And make sure your market has a need for it.

    Mark Pescetti
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    • Profile picture of the author videolover7
      Personally, when I read this kind of
      poorly written sales copy, it really raises
      red flags of doubt.
      As a copywriter, you must learn to put aside your own thoughts and feelings about a product or service. It's what the market thinks and feels that counts.

      VL
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      • Profile picture of the author MikeTucker
        Originally Posted by videolover7 View Post

        As a copywriter, you must learn to put aside your own thoughts and feelings about a product or service. It's what the market thinks and feels that counts.

        VL
        Thankfully, I am my own market,
        and I only have to sell to people
        who think like I do.
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  • Profile picture of the author CabTenson
    I will repeat the sentiments of the other people on this forum: you are wrong.

    My favorite example of a great guarantee came from one of Dan Kennedy's books. The owner of a pest control business built a whole empire on a guarantee (a brilliant sales device). A common problem with termite spraying at the time was that, oftentimes, the termites would come back 5 years after spraying. So, the business owner gave a lifetime guarantee on the HOUSE - even if the house passed owners, if the termites returned they'd get a free spray and their money back....maybe even double their money back (I forget).

    The guarantee is used as a device to bring up other benefits, such as how long their termite removal lasts for.
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  • Profile picture of the author DougHughes
    I spent the last month testing guarantees on around 130k visits across three sites.

    I tested guarantees in the headline, not in the headline, and 30, 60, 90 day, and numerous copy variations using Visual Website Optimizer.

    In each case a more powerful guarantee boosted conversion. The winning variation boosted conversion by 964% over the control.

    These changes to the guarantee were the only changes tested.

    In this case, with this offer and market data showed the stronger guarantee win. On other tests, offers, and markets I've tested the data has always supported the case for a stronger guarantee.
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  • Profile picture of the author KayMaxim
    Great discussion guys and very informative. Thanks everyone.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
    Originally Posted by Ken_Caudill View Post

    Try it, please ,please, please, pretty please. If you don't like it I'll give you your money back.

    Yeah, that's some brass balls selling.
    Look...

    All that a guarantee REALLY says is, "I know you have to take my word that what I'm saying is true. Since you don't know me, I'll be happy to let you make sure I'm not full of sh!t. If I am full of sh!t, you caught my bluff. I'll give you your money back. If I'm NOT a complete con artist, then I hope you feel the same way that I do about my mind blowing widget..."

    It's not rocket science.

    Do you need to have a guarantee to make massive sales?

    Hell no.

    I've never personally used a guarantee to sell ANY of mine own stuff.

    That being said...

    I've made people more money using guarantees, at the right point in in their copy, when i deem it necessary.

    Also...

    I've done quite a few pages on Clickbank... And you know their rules, right?

    Mark Pescetti
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