How do people trust a copywriter?

15 replies
Getting people's trust is key to getting decent copywriting jobs. Your clients have to be absolutely certain that their investment in you will bring the returns they want and more.

As a foreign language copywriter ready to help people to adapt their English products into other foreign language markets, how would you fellow copywriters suggest I can gain the trust of potential clients?

Here are some ideas:

- showing them what I've done (although they won't understand the language)
- directing them to clickbank products I did the copy for to show that my copy converts (they can see the gravity)
- selling through a platform which offers protection (like elance)

This is about writing short or long copy salespages in other languages for online sales.

Elance is more for translation and not skilled copy, so I'm a bit confused about what platform I can use to reassure people.

If fellow copywriters can make some suggestions I'd appreciate it
#copywriter #people #trust
  • Sounds like you're forgetting one basic element: testimonials.

    Get some solid testimonials (preferably with pics if possible) and show off. Remember, you're competing against other people for jobs: make them sit in your shadow by showing off how good you are (in a modest way; not simply appearing arrogant).
    Signature
    50% converting squeeze pages, 12% converting WSO's, and more...
    BenPalmerWilson Copywriting
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6444153].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Techology
    Everything is about overcoming objections. There are some basic ones, which you have identified of course, but there will also be personal ones.

    And you will only find out what they are by talking with your prospect. All my early mistakes in marketing came from the usual problem of trying to get 'everyone' interested in what I do.

    It all changed when I realised I would have to divide and conquer. Target one avatar, and one avatar only. Get their trust and move on. Good copywriting costs a lot of money, so you have the luxury of being able to go after a very small group of people.

    Do it person by person with individual videos and build from there.

    You have a great and pretty unique skill there too.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6444482].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Ken Hoffman
    A lot of it has to do with YOU. And having the ability to convey certainty to your clients that you can get results for them. That has to do with Mr. Confidence as John Carlton says.

    Testimonials are key to build credibility. Your positioning and client intake process also play a role.

    You might want to check out the upcoming Dan Kennedy book on Trust. I know I will be.
    Signature
    http://www.warriorforum.com/warriors...ost-sales.html
    Professional Direct Response Copywriting
    50% Off Limited Time Offer!
    "http://www.profitproducingcopy.com"
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6447327].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author videolover7
      To help build trust, give potential clients the opportunity to speak with you via Skype.

      VL
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6447531].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author JRemington
    Some great tips there guys.
    Thanks, much appreciated.
    Signature
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6449272].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
    You know...

    I don't have a single testimonial on my website. And past clients (some current ones too) have said amazing things about me.

    But I don't post them on purpose. Nor do I present a portfolio.

    Because creating successful relationships is all about establishing a rapport.

    When a new client calls me, I use my copywriting/marketing awareness and insights to provide some really forward-thinking responses. I want new clients to focus on their potentials, their market, their variables.

    Because guess what?

    As much as I'd love to say that my past results mean something... they don't.

    Just because I've written ridiculously successful copy in the past does NOT mean I'll be able to do it for you.

    So rather than speaking about my past successes, I always steer new clients to their own marketing circumstances - so we CAN create the financial results (i.e. profits) they're calling me to help manifest.

    If the conversation is about me having to prove myself to them, based upon past results, I decline.

    Simple as that.

    From my personal experience though...

    Giving simple, to-the-point responses to the tough questions (that serve as roadblocks for a lot of entrepreneurs) earns their trust (by demonstrating my expertise.)

    That being said...

    If I were applying for a full time copywriting job or something of that nature, I'd probably ask for some reviews of my work from past clients. I'd also ASK for permission to show their copy (that I wrote) so employers could check out some of my most successful campaigns.

    Mark Pescetti

    P.S. I actually agree with videolover for once. Get people on Skype. Let them see you. Successful relationships are all about creating a real connection. If they can see you, you're more real to them. That's important. I can honestly say that some of my recent projects would NOT have become successful WITHOUT creating a intimate rapport via Skype.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6451037].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author videolover7
      Originally Posted by Mark Pescetti View Post

      You know...

      I don't have a single testimonial on my website. And past clients (some current ones too) have said amazing things about me.

      But I don't post them on purpose. Nor do I present a portfolio.
      .
      Despite the fact that we live in a skeptical day and age, a significant portion of the population is still very trusting. They respond positively to service providers who exhibit confidence and knowledge without requesting proof.

      I'm sure if you had testimonials on your website, you'd get more inquiries. But it sounds like you already have enough work.

      VL
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6451756].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
        Originally Posted by videolover7 View Post

        Despite the fact that we live in a skeptical day and age, a significant portion of the population is still very trusting. They respond positively to service providers who exhibit confidence and knowledge without requesting proof.

        I'm sure if you had testimonials on your website, you'd get more inquiries. But it sounds like you already have enough work.

        VL
        Exactly, if I put up my testimonials, I might more inquires. And I realize in this day and age, social proof and referrals are how most businesses... stay in business.

        But I use my own personal sales copy to communicate to the people who get my message, because those are the clients I want to work with and help.

        And 9 times out of 10, people only contact me because they've pretty much decided they want to hire me.

        In fact... I haven't had to prospect for copywriting clients this year until just a few weeks ago.

        Then I decided to just write my newest product I've been wanting to finish for two years, while I allow the ridiculously targeted Adwords campaigns I put up to work their magic.

        Mark
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6452033].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Techology
    Like your style Mark. It takes confidence to do that.

    Everything you ever see about marketing says testimonials are second only to personal recommendations. But to say the past means diddly-squat puts you in a whole new dimension.

    I reckon that is a pretty good USP
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6451262].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Ken Hoffman
      Originally Posted by Techology View Post

      Like your style Mark. It takes confidence to do that.

      Everything you ever see about marketing says testimonials are second only to personal recommendations. But to say the past means diddly-squat puts you in a whole new dimension.

      I reckon that is a pretty good USP
      I agree that sometimes it's good to go against the grain, but when every single top copywriter in the business (Without exception)uses testimonials on their site, I think it's a mistake to not use them for proof and credibility.

      Past results do mean something. Of course they don't ensure you're going to get them in the future. But they do indicate proof of past success.

      I totally agree about the personal connection and getting on either Skype or the telephone, or face-to-face if possible.
      Signature
      http://www.warriorforum.com/warriors...ost-sales.html
      Professional Direct Response Copywriting
      50% Off Limited Time Offer!
      "http://www.profitproducingcopy.com"
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6451506].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author SusanLandry
    From my perspective/experience:

    1. Testimonials. These should go beyond "Max is a great writer" and cite specific positive attributes about your work - as well as what it's like to work with you. Testimonials should be backed by full names, titles, and companies to support their credibility.

    2. Evidence of past successes achieved for clients. Depending on your speciality and niche, this may include increased conversions, greater lead generation, media recognition, improved search engine rankings, industry awards and accolades, etc.

    3. Writing samples. This helps the client get a better sense of your copywriting style and ability and how you approach various projects.

    4. A conversation. Whether face-to-face or over the phone, this is your chance to ask questions, offer helpful suggestions, and demonstrate your expertise to the client. It's also an opportunity to establish rapport and make the client feel comfortable with the idea of working closely with you. Many times, I've been able to win over a prospect simply by speaking with them for 10 minutes.
    Signature
    Susan Landry, Marketing Copywriter
    "Putting the Power of Persuasion Into Words"
    www.susanlandry.com

    Follow me on Twitter! Please.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6451918].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
    Originally Posted by JRemington View Post

    Getting people's trust is key to getting decent copywriting jobs. Your clients have to be absolutely certain that their investment in you will bring the returns they want and more.

    As a foreign language copywriter ready to help people to adapt their English products into other foreign language markets, how would you fellow copywriters suggest I can gain the trust of potential clients?

    Here are some ideas:

    - showing them what I've done (although they won't understand the language)
    - directing them to clickbank products I did the copy for to show that my copy converts (they can see the gravity)
    - selling through a platform which offers protection (like elance)

    This is about writing short or long copy salespages in other languages for online sales.

    Elance is more for translation and not skilled copy, so I'm a bit confused about what platform I can use to reassure people.

    If fellow copywriters can make some suggestions I'd appreciate it
    JRemington,

    Done right, you have a PERFECT opportunity to build trust.

    There aren't many people who know how to do what you do--at all.

    I suspect there's a solid methodology behind it. Almost like keyword research for PPC campaigns. Choosing and translating each phrase or word precisely--from the source piece to the destination piece.

    Here's an idea:

    You could put together a very thorough "flagship" report which shows what's involved. Spell out the process.

    Give examples. Lots of examples.

    Examples of where it's done right and works. And examples where the copywriter/translator missed the mark. Examples where you can improve what another copywriter/translator has done.

    Instead of selling folks or persuading them on the idea of hiring you, influence their thinking. Give'em something to ponder. A bone to chew on.

    In other words, teaching/educating builds trust implicitly.

    If they're opportunisticly oriented, they'll reach out to you saying "How do we get this done?"

    ----

    All it really takes is sending it out via email to prime prospects with a "When you're ready" type attitude.

    No hard sell. Just an invitation.

    - Rick Duris

    PS: Last year, I wrote a piece for a thrash guitarist from Spain. He couldn't speak a word of English, yet he wanted to break into the American market.

    So I know there's a market for this type of service.
    Signature
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6452713].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author JRemington
      Originally Posted by RickDuris View Post

      JRemington,

      Done right, you have a PERFECT opportunity to build trust.

      There aren't many people who know how to do what you do--at all.

      I suspect there's a solid methodology behind it. Almost like keyword research for PPC campaigns. Choosing and translating each phrase or word precisely--from the source piece to the destination piece.

      Here's an idea:

      You could put together a very thorough "flagship" report which shows what's involved. Spell out the process.

      Give examples. Lots of examples.

      Examples of where it's done right and works. And examples where the copywriter/translator missed the mark. Examples where you can improve what another copywriter/translator has done.

      Instead of selling folks or persuading them on the idea of hiring you, influence their thinking. Give'em something to ponder. A bone to chew on.

      In other words, teaching/educating builds trust implicitly.

      If they're opportunistically oriented, they'll reach out to you saying "How do we get this done?"

      ----

      All it really takes is sending it out via email to prime prospects with a "When you're ready" type attitude.

      No hard sell. Just an invitation.

      - Rick Duris

      PS: Last year, I wrote a piece for a thrash guitarist from Spain. He couldn't speak a word of English, yet he wanted to break into the American market.

      So I know there's a market for this type of service.
      Awesome stuff Rick, thanks for that valuable feedback.

      Signature
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6455817].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Techology
    All it really takes is sending it out via email to prime prospects with a "When you're ready" type attitude.
    Rick, how many times do you need to nudge them to get action, and how often? Have you found a sweet spot?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6457082].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
    I really don't know for sure. Here's why:

    When I was writing that first post, I had a vision for what the entire campaign would look like. Including an optin page, autoresponder sequence, and the flagship report.

    Plus most importantly for getting the ball rolling, a short 3-5 max email sequence individualized to the owners of winning online promotions.

    If it were me, I'd pick my targets, do my research on those target promotions and then craft communication to the owners which would cut through the noise.

    But I'd hit the send key expecting to win on each one of those targets.

    It would be a quality over quantity approach.

    Let me give you a quick analogy which may help.

    ----

    When I owned a system integration company, one of the pillars of my marketing was giving targeted, content-rich presentations at trade shows, in little breakout seminar rooms.

    Marketing-wise, these work--except the caveat to doing them is you're prohibited from "being commercial".

    These speeches/presentations were expected to be totally informational. They didn't want the tradeshow's educational arm turning into a pitch fest.

    Understandable.

    For the 30+ companies presenting, while doing these tradeshow seminars increased their credibility, in terms of generating real business? They went home empty-handed.

    Except for two other firms and mine. We knew how to consistently walk out of seminar rooms with prospects in hand worth $100K to $500K.

    You can bet those other firms who didn't understand the strategy were salivating over our new found prospects.

    Like front-of-the-room selling, there's an art to this "anti-selling" approach.

    - Rick Duris
    Signature
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6457982].message }}

Trending Topics