Massive Work on a Tweet that Croaked -- What Went Wrong?

30 replies
Hey,

I've just gotta know what you all think of this brilliant ad.

Here it is: Social Media Agency Spend 45 Days Creating A Single Tweet, Get No RTs

ELMO
#croaked #massive #tweet #work #wrong
  • Profile picture of the author angiecolee
    To me, it's all voice.

    Twitter and Facebook? These things speak in a very conversational, very current voice. And that makes efforts like this seem very contrived.

    Especially when you think of how nimble certain brands are - remember Nabisco/Oreo and the lights-out Super Bowl tweet, complete with graphics?
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  • Profile picture of the author The Copy Nazi
    Banned
    "Sharing a Camembert with friends? How cheesy. Why does it smell like a fart anyway?"
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  • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
    Somebody should be fired.
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    • Profile picture of the author angiecolee
      Originally Posted by RickDuris View Post

      Somebody should be fired.
      Yeah, definitely the person that thought, "everyone and their mother should have input on this before it goes out" over, "I should hire someone whom I can trust to speak on behalf of the company".
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    • Profile picture of the author gjabiz
      Originally Posted by RickDuris View Post

      Somebody should be fired.
      I guess, ONE of the benefits of being an agency copy writer. Just my opinion, but when it comes to committee consensus and copy...

      consensus sucks.
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      • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
        Originally Posted by gjabiz View Post

        I guess, ONE of the benefits of being an agency copy writer. Just my opinion, but when it comes to committee consensus and copy...

        consensus sucks.
        99.99% of my work is ultra-collaborative. I don't think consensus is the issue. Of course, you can make it the issue easily.

        I believe someone clearly didn't get the WSO on how social media works.
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        • Profile picture of the author The Copy Nazi
          Banned
          It's just so friggin' lame isn't it?

          As for "Copy by committee"... I once did a gig for Qantas - a booklet of "Independent Traveller" voucher offers for the U.K. .... The agency made the Marketing Manager the hero. So we wrote it in his "voice". He was a boofhead ex-ironman type. Macho. Went to a committee...came back hacked and slashed and lacking in any personality. Read like something your Granny would like...and forget in about 10 seconds flat. "You must see Anne Hathaway's Cottage. We've managed to secure a marvellous deal" (you'll wet your panties Granny - promise)
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          • Profile picture of the author angiecolee
            Originally Posted by The Copy Nazi View Post

            It's just so friggin' lame isn't it?

            As for "Copy by committee"... I once did a gig for Qantas - a booklet of "Independent Traveller" voucher offers for the U.K. .... The agency made the Marketing Manager the hero. So we wrote it in his "voice". He was a boofhead ex-ironman type. Macho. Went to a committee...came back hacked and slashed and lacking in any personality. Read like something your Granny would like...and forget in about 10 seconds flat. "You must see Anne Hathaway's Cottage. We're managed to secure a marvellous deal" (you'll wet your panties Granny - promise)
            Ugh. I have to deal with that daily.

            Just had an argument with someone yesterday about an email that was going out "too quirky".

            And I told him, yeah - that's what the brand voice is. It's established. Mirrors language used in other emails. It's nothing out of the box for our customer base.

            "Well I don't like it, and I don't think our customers will either."

            Good thing you're not the one charged with defining and keeping the voice then, eh buddy?
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        • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
          Originally Posted by gjabiz View Post

          I guess, ONE of the benefits of being an agency copy writer. Just my opinion, but when it comes to committee consensus and copy...

          consensus sucks.
          Originally Posted by RickDuris View Post

          99.99% of my work is ultra-collaborative. I don't think consensus is the issue. Of course, you can make it the issue easily.

          I believe someone clearly didn't get the WSO on how social media works.
          Committee and collaboration, to me, are different monsters.

          Committees, in my experience, are full-of-themselves, semantics-driven, sabotage-addicted sticks in the mud.

          Collaboration, on the other hand, is when people share their insights and work towards being effective - not right.

          The tweet sucks.

          Although...

          The person who wrote it may not be the one who needs firing.

          Mark
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnRyserson
    Banned
    Why were they so focused on just getting one tweet to produce?

    They should have tried for an entire campaign over the span of some weeks or months...
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  • Profile picture of the author jjosephs
    45 days on a freakin tweet? Takes less time to create Twitter.com
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  • Profile picture of the author elmo033057
    I think the line that freaked me out the worst in the article was:

    "The following week they met again to create the image for the tweet, which was then pitched at a team meeting where up to 20 strategists are in attendance. It then moved to an internal review process, where copywriters and strategists finally sign off on the work."

    My Gosh, did they do an analysis of the cost of that ad per writer? Oh, wait, that would be more wasted money on a grand scale!
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    • Profile picture of the author splitTest


      It's the "How generous!" line that took all that much time & brainpower to create. You don't get "cute" like that off the top of your head...

      To be fair, the Business Insider article (which Huh magazine references) never said the social media agency spent 45 days creating "a single tweet."

      (a la "Social Media Agency Spend 45 Days Creating A Single Tweet, Get No RTs")

      From what I glean from the Business Insider article, the agency created a bunch of tweets in a couple weeks then passed them along to the client to approve.

      Might've just taken a month or so for a single exec at the client co. to sign off on a bunch of tweets. I can see how that could happen.
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      • Profile picture of the author angiecolee
        Originally Posted by splitTest View Post


        Might've just taken a month or so for a single exec at the client co. to sign off on a bunch of tweets. I can see how that could happen.
        Again, I'd argue they're missing the boat.

        If the power goes out in the stadium where the Super Bowl's happening and a brand like Oreo can jump on it with a Tweet, planning these things weeks out without accounting for the need to be nimble is pretty lame.

        I've worked with people who specialize in social media. All they do all day long is post to various social networks on behalf of companies. They're part of the marketing team. They know the voice. They know what's coming down the pipeline, and their job is to be plugged into what's new and popular EVERY DAY.

        And that's what I mean by hiring someone you trust to act on your behalf. (And that goes for anything really, from administrative stuff to taxes to writing copy.)

        Yeah, you can plan out campaign sequences in advance and load these things all up, timed to release at certain points. But you've also got to be ready to talk in real time.

        That's where death by committee starts - the executives with the inability to remove themselves from a situation where they have no expertise, but still feel compelled to share their opinions.

        I tend to trust the in-the-trenches people over those at the top.
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        • Profile picture of the author splitTest
          Originally Posted by angiecolee View Post

          Again, I'd argue they're missing the boat.
          You're prolly right about that. Just saying I can see how it could happen, with tweets being the last thing on most execs' minds & agenda.
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  • Profile picture of the author MNord
    There are a couple of fun posts about this at adcontrarian.com. If what he says is correct, the lack of retweets could be because the company had very few followers (he says 100, but I don't know if he's being sarcastic).

    Anyway, the fact that this took 45 days and apparently a dozen people...it would be funny if someone didn't actually pay for it.

    Scratch that. It's funny anyway
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  • Profile picture of the author elmo033057
    Hey, at least it wasn't as disastrous as this Tweet: Boots On The Ground Tweet
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    • Profile picture of the author Will Compton
      Here's my guess:
      1. Committees murder ads
      2. Social media is almost worthless
      3. The artwork doesn't add to the salesmanship
      4. There is no "reason why"
      5. There is no call to action

      Maybe if they said something like "Click Here To Discover A New Way To Serve Camembert Cheese Your Guests Will Love!"
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      • Profile picture of the author angiecolee
        Originally Posted by Will Compton View Post

        Here's my guess:
        1. Committees murder ads
        2. Social media is almost worthless

        Maybe if they said something like "Click Here To Discover A New Way To Serve Camembert Cheese Your Guests Will Love!"
        Your first "guess", in reality an assumption, is largely historically correct.

        Your second "guess" is based on what facts exactly? ROI? Statistical analysis? Personal opinion? Second-hand stories?

        And your call to action is recycled garbage that hardly appeals to the target customer. Think a cheese snob needs to know HOW to serve cheese?

        Social media is not a hard-sell vehicle.

        Why? Because most people don't want someone following them to a bar (or other established "chill out and relax" zones and asking them to buy shit.

        This is part of the reason why many social media companies are finding it hard to monetize - they have customer data they can sell, but they can't really make direct sales because a majority of the market isn't looking to buy there. When they are, companies don't know how to close the deal, as demonstrated by this entire thread.

        But are there people making sales because of social media? You bet your ass. I'll give you an example, notwithstanding the Oreo example I gave earlier (which is a fantastic demonstration of top-of-mind positioning, even if it doesn't result in direct sales).

        One local cupcake company (when I lived in the San Fernando Valley, California) built a massive Twitter and Facebook following with a campaign. Specifically, more than 10,000, which is pretty damn good for a local chain.

        How? They devised a campaign to give a single free featured cupcake PER DAY to the first 25 people to physically come to the store with the secret password of the day.

        Each person had to say the password too, even if you brought in a group. Guess what? The store often had such interesting flavors available, in addition to a GIGANTIC monthly calendar of daily flavor features, that people wound up buying 3-4, sometimes even more. WITH their free cupcakes.

        Sometimes people only went in for the freebie and left. I'm definitely guilty of that.

        But what did it cost that company? A couple dozen free cupcakes per day per location (I believe it had four). No press. No pay per clicks. No radio support. Just sheer word of mouth.

        And I STILL stop by that place every time I'm in town and buy a box of at least 4. At $3+ a pop, you bet your ass I'm sampling some flavors.

        Why does this work? Engagement. It's something a lot of companies really struggle with. Many don't even know who they're talking to, which makes it more difficult to sell.

        That's where a lot of the value of social media does come from. Not the hard sales. Not the number. THE DATA. The first-hand knowledge of the benefits of your product or service, straight from the horse's mouth.
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        • Profile picture of the author elmo033057
          Originally Posted by angiecolee View Post

          Your first "guess", in reality an assumption, is largely historically correct.

          Your second "guess" is based on what facts exactly? ROI? Statistical analysis? Personal opinion? Second-hand stories?

          And your call to action is recycled garbage that hardly appeals to the target customer. Think a cheese snob needs to know HOW to serve cheese?

          Social media is not a hard-sell vehicle.

          Why? Because most people don't want someone following them to a bar (or other established "chill out and relax" zones and asking them to buy shit.

          This is part of the reason why many social media companies are finding it hard to monetize - they have customer data they can sell, but they can't really make direct sales because a majority of the market isn't looking to buy there. When they are, companies don't know how to close the deal, as demonstrated by this entire thread.

          But are there people making sales because of social media? You bet your ass. I'll give you an example, notwithstanding the Oreo example I gave earlier (which is a fantastic demonstration of top-of-mind positioning, even if it doesn't result in direct sales).

          One local cupcake company (when I lived in the San Fernando Valley, California) built a massive Twitter and Facebook following with a campaign. Specifically, more than 10,000, which is pretty damn good for a local chain.

          How? They devised a campaign to give a single free featured cupcake PER DAY to the first 25 people to physically come to the store with the secret password of the day.

          Each person had to say the password too, even if you brought in a group. Guess what? The store often had such interesting flavors available, in addition to a GIGANTIC monthly calendar of daily flavor features, that people wound up buying 3-4, sometimes even more. WITH their free cupcakes.

          Sometimes people only went in for the freebie and left. I'm definitely guilty of that.

          But what did it cost that company? A couple dozen free cupcakes per day per location (I believe it had four). No press. No pay per clicks. No radio support. Just sheer word of mouth.

          And I STILL stop by that place every time I'm in town and buy a box of at least 4. At $3+ a pop, you bet your ass I'm sampling some flavors.

          Why does this work? Engagement. It's something a lot of companies really struggle with. Many don't even know who they're talking to, which makes it more difficult to sell.

          That's where a lot of the value of social media does come from. Not the hard sales. Not the number. THE DATA. The first-hand knowledge of the benefits of your product or service, straight from the horse's mouth.
          Interesting story on the Cupcake marketing social media blitz. I am wondering if they took the time to get those customers on an email list too. You know, they come in to get the cupcake and the business asks them for their email so that they can let them know about other contests and special offers.

          Just wondering, because that was an awesome idea, and it sounds like the execution was done well

          Great story!!!

          ELMO
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          • Profile picture of the author angiecolee
            Originally Posted by elmo033057 View Post

            Interesting story on the Cupcake marketing social media blitz. I am wondering if they took the time to get those customers on an email list too. You know, they come in to get the cupcake and the business asks them for their email so that they can let them know about other contests and special offers.

            Just wondering, because that was an awesome idea, and it sounds like the execution was done well

            Great story!!!

            ELMO
            You know, I'd have to say they failed in the email follow through. But maybe they ran the numbers and figured out it was easier to do timed social media blitzes than to set up a whole email program. Just in looking up their biz yesterday, I saw they'd added a few more locations. Something's gotta be working right for them, ya know?

            I followed them on Facebook and on Twitter until I relocated to the Bay Area. I've since unfollowed, but like I said - any time I head down to LA, I check their site and stop by on days I know they've made my faves.
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        • Profile picture of the author Will Compton
          Originally Posted by angiecolee View Post

          Your second "guess" is based on what facts exactly? ROI? Statistical analysis? Personal opinion? Second-hand stories?
          Let me rephrase it for you... In my experience, social media is almost worthless. It's my opinion based on years of testing and arithmetic.

          The reason being is, people say they like something based on social pressures and not because they are ready to spend cash.

          For example, most church goers will tell you they've read the Bible, but statistically, it's a lie. And they'll also tell you they would never read The Enquirer, but statistically, that's a lie.

          Another example is when a woman says, "I wish I could find a nice guy." And then goes on to date jerk after jerk. What she really wants is a strong man who is exciting, has his own life and has better things to do than to pine over her all day... but she won't tell you that.

          I, personally, find social media to be almost worthless because you're targeting people that say they are interested in something. But why not look at what they are actually spending their money on already? People can lie but numbers can't.

          It's been tested for more than a century since Claude Hopkins time, people say one thing and spend their money on another. And if you want to be a successful copywriter you have to live and deal in reality, flip through the Standard Rate and Data Service (SRDS) and see what people actually spend their money on. It's a lot different than what their facebook "likes" indicate.

          Money, cost per acquisition, cost per lead, return on investment, and contribution to overhead are the only metrics that matter.

          Originally Posted by angiecolee View Post

          And your call to action is recycled garbage that hardly appeals to the target customer. Think a cheese snob needs to know HOW to serve cheese?
          My pitch was "Discover A New Way To Serve Camembert Cheese Your Guests Will Love!" The most important word, according to John Caples, is 'New.' Even though it's pointless to argue without testing the numbers, I'm going to disagree. I think "cheese snobs" would like to read about a NEW way to serve cheese they might not know. If you're a fanatic for cheese you'll want to learn everything you can...

          Originally Posted by angiecolee View Post

          One local cupcake company (when I lived in the San Fernando Valley, California) built a massive Twitter and Facebook following with a campaign. Specifically, more than 10,000, which is pretty damn good for a local chain.

          How? They devised a campaign to give a single free featured cupcake PER DAY to the first 25 people to physically come to the store with the secret password of the day.

          Each person had to say the password too, even if you brought in a group. Guess what? The store often had such interesting flavors available, in addition to a GIGANTIC monthly calendar of daily flavor features, that people wound up buying 3-4, sometimes even more. WITH their free cupcakes.

          Sometimes people only went in for the freebie and left. I'm definitely guilty of that.

          But what did it cost that company? A couple dozen free cupcakes per day per location (I believe it had four). No press. No pay per clicks. No radio support. Just sheer word of mouth.

          And I STILL stop by that place every time I'm in town and buy a box of at least 4. At $3+ a pop, you bet your ass I'm sampling some flavors.

          Why does this work? Engagement. It's something a lot of companies really struggle with. Many don't even know who they're talking to, which makes it more difficult to sell.
          It works because there is a call to action, "Come in and get a free sample." But without knowing the numbers (ROI, customer lifetime value, average profit per transaction) we can't really know if it made them money, which is the only goal of advertising.

          Originally Posted by angiecolee View Post

          That's where a lot of the value of social media does come from. Not the hard sales. Not the number. THE DATA. The first-hand knowledge of the benefits of your product or service, straight from the horse's mouth.
          "The only purpose of advertising is to make sales. It is profitable or unprofitable according to its actual sales." - Claude Hopkins' Scientific Advertising
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          • Profile picture of the author angiecolee
            Originally Posted by Will Compton View Post


            It works because there is a call to action, "Come in and get a free sample." But without knowing the numbers (ROI, customer lifetime value, average profit per transaction) we can't really know if it made them money, which is the only goal of advertising.
            Calls to action don't work for long if the product isn't good enough to support an engaged, fanatical audience.

            I don't see social media as a be-all, end-all marketing solution. But it does make sense as part of a balanced, well-planned marketing campaign aimed at creating raving, LOYAL fans.

            I get it though - what matters to you is sales. What matters to me is loyalty and lifetime customer value. I'm a FAN of that cupcake company. I like and occasionally eat cupcakes from elsewhere.

            I want sales, but I don't want to constantly chase new business. I want them to come to me. And thus, the power of a well-done social media campaign (in addition to other marketing efforts).
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            • Profile picture of the author Will Compton
              Originally Posted by angiecolee View Post

              I don't see social media as a be-all, end-all marketing solution. But it does make sense as part of a balanced, well-planned marketing campaign aimed at creating raving, LOYAL fans.
              I see what you mean and here's a great quote from Hopkins about that:

              "Samples sometimes seem to double advertising cost. They often cost more than the advertising. Yet, rightly used, they almost invariably form the cheapest way to get customers. And that is what you want."

              You made some good points, and good on that cupcake company for running a successful direct response ad through social media. Was it Twitter you said?

              I guess I'm ignorant when it comes to social media... So what are the best strategies and tactics you've found to work?
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              • Profile picture of the author angiecolee
                Originally Posted by Will Compton View Post

                Was it Twitter you said?

                I guess I'm ignorant when it comes to social media... So what are the best strategies and tactics you've found to work?
                It was Twitter and Facebook, simultaneously. Post would go up on FB, Tweet sent, and the first 25 in would get delicious, cupcakey goodness.

                I don't currently plan social media campaigns and I'm by no means an expert in social media marketing. I just pay attention to what works and what does NOT work.

                I've always got an eye on things that could work for myself or my clients.
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                • Profile picture of the author elmo033057
                  Originally Posted by angiecolee View Post

                  It was Twitter and Facebook, simultaneously. Post would go up on FB, Tweet sent, and the first 25 in would get delicious, cupcakey goodness.

                  I don't currently plan social media campaigns and I'm by no means an expert in social media marketing. I just pay attention to what works and what does NOT work.

                  I've always got an eye on things that could work for myself or my clients.
                  Yeah, you can't be an expert on everything that's for sure. Not to stray from the subject too much, but if you use a lot of different marketing messages and channels you'll be spread too thin.

                  Better to be a master of one or two methods rather than a whole bunch. Having said that, I don't know why the company that sent out the "croak-tweet" didn't just delegate that task to one or two people that specialize in that sort of marketing rather than have half the company or agency wrapped up into that soiree.

                  Oh, well, just my take.

                  ELMO
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  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    Because it reads like an ad - plus they didn't ask to be retweeted.
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  • Profile picture of the author elmo033057
    Since we're on the subject, I thought that this graphic was pretty interesting. I wonder what new frontiers of marketing will open up in the future. Any guesses? (The funniest prediction was the "Avatar manager" I thought that was hilarious.Of course that is for Second Life addicts, I guess.
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