Lessons from the Titans of Direct Response

15 replies
With the event coming up in a couple of months, and the latest thread with some good discussion points, I decided to dig a bit deeper and found this awesome video:


"Brian Kurtz and Roy Furr discuss the lessons from each of the titans of direct response."

Enjoy!

P.S. What's your number one lesson from any of the Titans?
#direct #lessons #response #titans
  • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
    And here are some banner ads I've seen promoting the event. Retargeting, no doubt.

    Alex
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
    Well... there ya go.

    Good find Chris.

    Mark

    P.S. Love your "babyface" gimmick.
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    • Profile picture of the author NickN
      Originally Posted by Mark Pescetti View Post


      P.S. Love your "babyface" gimmick.
      I completely agree. As a babyface myself, this copy from your website is especially relevant:

      "I'm an underdog.

      Just like you.

      Why?

      Because of my Baby-Face.

      I'm overlooked by marketers who presume that I'm incapable of delivering results because of my youthful looks.

      But this is the exact reason why I do deliver results...

      My baby-face forces me to work twice as hard to grow my business."

      Cool stuff!

      -Nick
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      • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
        Number 14 on my list of Advanced Tactics: "Turn perceived flaws into selling points".

        Way to go Chris!

        Alex
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnRussell
    Avis Rent-a-Car - We're Number 2 so we try harder.

    Didn't work that well for them though because you forget who the slogan was about.

    Something to think about...
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    • Profile picture of the author Ross Bowring
      Originally Posted by JohnRussell View Post

      Avis Rent-a-Car - We're Number 2 so we try harder.

      Didn't work that well for them though because you forget who the slogan was about.

      Something to think about...
      I don't get this, please expand.

      --- Ross
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      • Profile picture of the author JohnRussell
        Originally Posted by Ross Bowring View Post

        I don't get this, please expand.

        --- Ross
        Sorry, that was a little cryptic I think.

        The OP's schtick is that he is the baby-face copywriter. Sort of like - I look young and inexperienced so I have to really kick-ass.

        Now, I didn't actually read his letter so I made that up but it reminded me of the 'we're #2 so we try harder thing'.

        The thing is - I couldn't remember who's slogan that was - I had to google it.

        That's the same way with lots of jingles, slogans etc. They're clever so you remember them but often not the company they are associated with. Which is a fail.

        It's like - whose slogan was 'built to last'? Great slogan but it doesn't help much if people don't immediately associate with the company.

        Slogans/jingles that incorporate the company name are better. Ie - 'I wish I were an Oscar Meyer wiener...'

        So...

        I was thinking the OP should incorporate his name more into his moniker. Like:

        Chris 'Baby-face' Wright.

        So potential clients don't think...

        'I remember there was that baby-face guy. He sounded good but I don't remember who he was.'

        I'll admit - it's a little out there - it was just a thought.
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        • Profile picture of the author angiecolee
          Originally Posted by JohnRussell View Post

          Sorry, that was a little cryptic I think.

          The OP's schtick is that he is the baby-face copywriter. Sort of like - I look young and inexperienced so I have to really kick-ass.

          Now, I didn't actually read his letter so I made that up but it reminded me of the 'we're #2 so we try harder thing'.

          The thing is - I couldn't remember who's slogan that was - I had to google it.

          That's the same way with lots of jingles, slogans etc. They're clever so you remember them but often not the company they are associated with. Which is a fail.

          It's like - whose slogan was 'built to last'? Great slogan but it doesn't help much if people don't immediately associate with the company.

          Slogans/jingles that incorporate the company name are better. Ie - 'I wish I were an Oscar Meyer wiener...'

          So...

          I was thinking the OP should incorporate his name more into his moniker. Like:

          Chris 'Baby-face' Wright.

          So potential clients don't think...

          'I remember there was that baby-face guy. He sounded good but I don't remember who he was.'

          I'll admit - it's a little out there - it was just a thought.
          I'd argue that they stop making sense when they've lost relevance. I'm pretty sure everyone here could name most if not all of the brands based on slogans below:

          -The real thing.
          -Plop, plop, fizz, fizz, oh what a relief it is.
          -15 minutes could save you 15% or more on car insurance
          -Save money. Live better.
          -Just do it.
          -Keeps going and going and going.
          -The happiest place on earth.
          -When you care enough to send the very best.
          -I'm loving it.
          -Have it your way.
          -Melts in your mouth, not in your hands.
          -Where's the beef?
          -Don't leave home without it!
          -You're in good hands.
          -Like a good neighbor.

          These slogans are powerful enough to evoke a brand, some through language, and others through sheer repetition.

          A brand is not a slogan. But a slogan can evoke a brand. The difference is worth studying.
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          • Profile picture of the author JohnRussell
            Originally Posted by angiecolee View Post

            I'd argue that they stop making sense when they've lost relevance. I'm pretty sure everyone here could name most if not all of the brands based on slogans below:

            -The real thing.
            -Plop, plop, fizz, fizz, oh what a relief it is.
            -15 minutes could save you 15% or more on car insurance
            -Save money. Live better.
            -Just do it.
            -Keeps going and going and going.
            -The happiest place on earth.
            -When you care enough to send the very best.
            -I'm loving it.
            -Have it your way.
            -Melts in your mouth, not in your hands.
            -Where's the beef?
            -Don't leave home without it!
            -You're in good hands.
            -Like a good neighbor.

            These slogans are powerful enough to evoke a brand, some through language, and others through sheer repetition.

            A brand is not a slogan. But a slogan can evoke a brand. The difference is worth studying.
            The example I used - Oscar Meyer Wiener - had the product name in it. As someone (Chris) who does not have the budget of Allstate or State Farm et al, I just think it's not a bad idea to use your name in the slogan - or whatever it's called.
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            • Profile picture of the author angiecolee
              Originally Posted by JohnRussell View Post

              The example I used - Oscar Meyer Wiener - had the product name in it. As someone (Chris) who does not have the budget of Allstate or State Farm et al, I just think it's not a bad idea to use your name in the slogan - or whatever it's called.
              Fair enough. Budget definitely does matter when considering top-of-mind status. I never did state having the name in the slogan/tagline was a bad idea. Just that there are examples out there of companies that have made it work without the name.

              And all those companies started with one person or one idea, too.

              Granted, by the time they came to tagline readiness, they were already likely making enough money to hire an agency.
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          • Profile picture of the author BudaBrit
            Originally Posted by angiecolee View Post

            I'd argue that they stop making sense when they've lost relevance. I'm pretty sure everyone here could name most if not all of the brands based on slogans below:

            -The real thing.
            -Plop, plop, fizz, fizz, oh what a relief it is.
            -15 minutes could save you 15% or more on car insurance
            -Save money. Live better.
            -Just do it.
            -Keeps going and going and going.
            -The happiest place on earth.
            -When you care enough to send the very best.
            -I'm loving it.
            -Have it your way.
            -Melts in your mouth, not in your hands.
            -Where's the beef?
            -Don't leave home without it!
            -You're in good hands.
            -Like a good neighbor.

            These slogans are powerful enough to evoke a brand, some through language, and others through sheer repetition.

            A brand is not a slogan. But a slogan can evoke a brand. The difference is worth studying.
            I could tell you two of them :p

            Melts in your mouth, not in your hands is familiar, though...
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  • Profile picture of the author jjosephs
    I agree. Great differentiation.

    Though if I looked that much like Daniel Radcliffe, I'd probably be gunning for the Harry Potter market instead
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    • Profile picture of the author Cam Connor
      There's some good advice in there from a whole bunch of top-notch Copywrters. \
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  • You know your brand has made it…

    When the name is used to describe the action.

    There was a time when people never said "Photo - copy it" instead it was "Xerox it"

    And they didn't say "Vacuum it" they said "Hoover it"


    Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author royfurr
    Hey all -- thanks for the props on the interview with Brian. That project has been a blast to work on.

    I'll chime in with my biggest lesson from any of the Titans (referenced in the video link in my signature). Gary Bencivenga taught me (through his interview with Ken McCarthy) that the way to become the best is by improving your skills just 1% every week.

    You start to earn compound interest on your knowledge and abilities, and within a couple years you're lapping the field, within a couple decades you become untouchable. Every tactic or trick you might learn aside, do this consistently and you'll be on your way to becoming a "Titan" yourself!

    Best wishes,

    Roy
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