How Many Emails are Too Many Emails?

by Best Seller 33 replies
I'll start by saying that, long before I incorporated email marketing into my own online marketing strategy, I was a subscriber to a few other people's lists on various topics. I remain a loyal subscriber to one of those lists, to this day, because it provides me with what I consider to be a reasonable amount of emails that always contain quality content. That reasonable amount of emails is, on average, three per week. Never more than that.

By contrast, I once subscribed to another list that I assume must have been created by an inexperienced affiliate marketer who was clearly more interested in building lists than in providing quality content. I say this because that individual started blasting me with emails--up to THREE PER DAY!--and automatically added me to other lists I hadn't subscribed to without my permission. I immediately unsubscribed from all the lists and marked the emails as spam, and I'll never join another list for that company's products/services again ... which is a real shame for that company because, up to then, I had viewed them as a reputable source of information on the topic. Not anymore.

When I started creating my own lists, I received advice that I should send one email per day that contains valuable content free of charge, interspersed with items for purchase only occasionally (like maybe once every three or four emails). I've been doing this and it seems to be working. No one has marked any of my emails as spam, and I've had only a 2% unsubscribe rate.

What are your thoughts? How much is too much? Or does that vary depending on the industry and topic matter?
#email marketing #affiliate marketing #email marketing #emails #subscribers
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  • Profile picture of the author DIABL0
    You need to test and figure out what frequency produces the most income for your specific list(s).

    Just keep an eye on your stats and they will tell you what is the correct frequency for your level of comfort of unsubscribes / complaints.

    If you are making more money, even if your opens / clickers start to drop off (due to higher sending frequency) only matters if your income also at some point starts to drop off.

    Typically you will find a point with increased frequency where you start to get diminished returns.

    Back off if anything starts to become excessive or you become uncomfortable.
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  • Profile picture of the author Gary Chapple
    Yes, you should divide your lists, a simple question how often do you want to be emailed will tell you!!!!

    There are some that once a week is more than enough, in fact, that is my standard and I fill it full of information like a newsletter, that I often get complimented for my content. then perhaps once a month I will recommend/pitch an offer that I feel will be of great value to my list (and it needs to be bloody good for me to promote).

    I do not abuse my list I will pitch what I feel with several backup emails, but only to those I know will accept that. I know my list so well by questions and competitions, that I can practically guarantee a certain ROI.
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  • Profile picture of the author Steve B
    The number of emails is not important because marketers have been very successful sending 1 email per month, in some cases, and 10 emails or more a day in other cases.

    It has nothing to do with you, the sender, and what you want . . . and everything to do with the receiver. What does he want? What will give him value? How often does he want to hear from you?

    I was once a member of a stock day trading service. They used to send me dozens of emails every trading day. Did I mind? Heck no . . . that's what I joined for - to get up-to-the-minute professional trading advice right now - not on the next scheduled emailing day.

    Email is not One-Size-Fits-All.
    • Give the customer value in every email.
    • Make sure his frequency expectations are understood.
    • Segment you lists to better cater to varying needs.
    • Build a relationship with your customers and be open to feedback.
    • Be respectful - don't waste the customer's time.
    • If you open rates are pathetic or declining, you're doing something wrong.
    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author wifiboos
      Steve has the right answer here. I couln't put it better so I'll just echo his bullet points here to emphasize his post summary...

      Email is not One-Size-Fits-All.
      Give the customer value in every email.
      Make sure his frequency expectations are understood.
      Segment you lists to better cater to varying needs.
      Build a relationship with your customers and be open to feedback.
      Be respectful - don't waste the customer's time.
      If you open rates are pathetic or declining, you're doing something wrong.
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      Get Your Mind-set Right - Take Consistent Action
      Connect with the right people

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  • Profile picture of the author Happerz
    Nothing to do with the number. Focused on the wrong goal.

    Depends if you write crappy ones.

    If you write content people want they won't be able to get enough.

    Write great emails ppl will ask for more if you're not writing enough.
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  • Profile picture of the author AlmaBelinda
    Like earlier said, it has nothing to do with the number.

    Make them active and verified mails, it's better if manually collected.

    Then you are good to go.
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    I am Alma L. Belinda. An award-winning Digital Marketer and international freelancer with strong expertises in Web Design, Writing and Social Media Marketing.

    I'm cool, I'm friendly and I'm a genius! Feel free to DM.

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  • Profile picture of the author DABK
    Steve's right. If you gave me $100 with every email message I opened, I think I'd be up with more than one a day every day of the year, for years on end.

    If you offered me garbage once a month, you'd be sending me one message a month too many.
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    • Profile picture of the author Best Seller
      Originally Posted by DABK View Post

      Steve's right. If you gave me $100 with every email message I opened, I think I'd be up with more than one a day every day of the year, for years on end.

      If you offered me garbage once a month, you'd be sending me one message a month too many.
      Very true!
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  • Profile picture of the author oppyeaunome
    The only way to find out if anything works online is to try it and see what happens. The thing that happens to most people and what stops them from taking action online is they think too much about what they want to do instead of just doing. Less thinking more action.

    I say the best way for you to know what will happen is to try it with your email list. I'm a subscriber of a few lists and for me, I think if you're giving lots of value then your subscribers are more likely to open your emails.

    On the other hand, if you're just sending them emails with no value and you're just sending offer after offer then there is not reason for them to stay there. Any business you run whether online or off is about the value you give to your customers. Give them enormous amounts of value and they will continue to give you their money.

    Hope that helps.
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  • Profile picture of the author OptedIn
    Whether you are sending me drek or prose, if you email me more than twice per week, I unsubscribe - especially if everything you send is a sales pitch.

    Thank you.
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  • Profile picture of the author deepockets
    [DELETED]
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    • Profile picture of the author nicheblogger75
      Originally Posted by deepockets View Post

      Once a week max.
      Unless you have an ENORMOUS list that is INCREDIBLY responsive, you aren't going to get too far sending one email a week in today's climate.

      I'm subscribed to many major company lists like Safeway, Home Depot, Redbox, etc, and they often send at least one email per day, sometimes two.
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  • Profile picture of the author Steve L
    Originally Posted by Best Seller View Post

    I'll start by saying that, long before I incorporated email marketing into my own online marketing strategy, I was a subscriber to a few other people's lists on various topics. I remain a loyal subscriber to one of those lists, to this day, because it provides me with what I consider to be a reasonable amount of emails that always contain quality content. That reasonable amount of emails is, on average, three per week. Never more than that.

    By contrast, I once subscribed to another list that I assume must have been created by an inexperienced affiliate marketer who was clearly more interested in building lists than in providing quality content. I say this because that individual started blasting me with emails--up to THREE PER DAY!--and automatically added me to other lists I hadn't subscribed to without my permission. I immediately unsubscribed from all the lists and marked the emails as spam, and I'll never join another list for that company's products/services again ... which is a real shame for that company because, up to then, I had viewed them as a reputable source of information on the topic. Not anymore.

    When I started creating my own lists, I received advice that I should send one email per day that contains valuable content free of charge, interspersed with items for purchase only occasionally (like maybe once every three or four emails). I've been doing this and it seems to be working. No one has marked any of my emails as spam, and I've had only a 2% unsubscribe rate.

    What are your thoughts? How much is too much? Or does that vary depending on the industry and topic matter?
    I think regardless if it's free content you're sending or an offer, your aim should be to deliver value to the customer. So long as that's the case, I don't think you can go wrong. One email a day I think is a little excessive but if it works for you then keep doing it!!
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