What are your experiences with multiple input fields?

8 replies
Hey Warriors,

I've never really done anything signficant in terms of growing a mailing list, and after reading a very interesting article on the LeadPages blog I'm curious to know your experiences with it.

The article: 5 (Really Good) Reasons NOT to Collect Names on Email Opt-In Forms

Have you noticed a drop the conversion rate if you ask for a users name (or something else) as oppose to just their email address?

I look forward to hearing from you!

- Joe
#experiences #fields #input #multiple
  • Profile picture of the author shabtay
    It's kind of a rule, the more fields the user need to fill, the conv will be lower.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    Originally Posted by Joe Crosbie View Post

    Have you noticed a drop the conversion rate if you ask for a users name (or something else) as oppose to just their email address?
    Yes ... in a sense. The same thing, other way round, anyway.

    I used to ask for name + email address (and when I was starting off, at the height of my naivety and inexperience, I actually used to use people's names as a salutation in my outgoing emails, not realising what a mistake it was, for me. ).

    When I stopped asking for their names (which I did in all my niches, at the same time), I started collecting 10-15% more opt-ins, across the board: my average increase in opt-ins was 12%.

    http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post7934937

    http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post8335017

    Originally Posted by Joe Crosbie View Post

    I chose entrepreneurship over further education despite being laughed at by my friends and family.
    I chose both. The knowledge/research/judgement/appraisal skills I acquired from studying for an academic degree were fantastically useful to setting up and running my own business. I couldn't have achieved or earned nearly so much without having benefitted from that process. I wouldn't have developed the analytical skills needed to apply to new and different and unrelated situations.

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  • It is about the privacy.

    I have been in these before.

    If you ask for name, then you use it to talk to them.

    Terrible.

    I hate it when they call my name. Then, I reply and receive no answer.

    I hate these people.

    If you ask for name, at least reply to them or talk about something special about them. Otherwise, just email.
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    • Profile picture of the author Joe Crosbie
      Originally Posted by shabtay View Post

      It's kind of a rule, the more fields the user need to fill, the conv will be lower.
      Of course, I've heard of the rule. I was just curious as it seems many people with hugely successful email lists are succeeding even when asking for a first name. Take Pat Flynn, from Smart Passive Income for example.

      Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

      Yes ... in a sense. The same thing, other way round, anyway.

      I used to ask for name + email address (and when I was starting off, at the height of my naivety and inexperience, I actually used to use people's names as a salutation in my outgoing emails, not realising what a mistake it was, for me. ).

      When I stopped asking for their names (which I did in all my niches, at the same time), I started collecting 10-15% more opt-ins, across the board: my average increase in opt-ins was 12%.

      http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post7934937

      http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post8335017
      Thanks for sharing that Alexa!

      Originally Posted by Alexa Smith;9283889
      I chose both. The knowledge/research/judgement/appraisal skills I acquired from studying for an academic degree were fantastically useful to setting up and running my own business. I couldn't have achieved or earned [I

      nearly[/I] so much without having benefitted from that process. I wouldn't have developed the analytical skills needed to apply to new and different and unrelated situations.
      I admire you for doing that. It must of been a lot of work, were you launching / running your business while in further education?

      I personally think that further education is a wonderful thing, and it's by far something that everyone should consider. My only issue with it is the way they teach it, after all research shows that everyone learns differently yet we are all taught in the same way?

      I'm one of those people who doesn't really get the full benefit from going as I find it hard to learn that way, a more practical hands on approach works much more effectively for me. Hence, why I decided to choose entrepreneurship/

      Originally Posted by alertmakemoney4738 View Post

      It is about the privacy.

      I have been in these before.

      If you ask for name, then you use it to talk to them.

      Terrible.

      I hate it when they call my name. Then, I reply and receive no answer.

      I hate these people.

      If you ask for name, at least reply to them or talk about something special about them. Otherwise, just email.
      I agree completely! Would you feel the same if someone asked you for your name in a sign up form, and actually replied to you directly if they contacted you?
      Signature
      I chose entrepreneurship over further education despite being laughed at by my friends and family..

      I recently hit the "RESTART" button on my life, read my personal blog to find out how I did it :)
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      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
        Banned
        Originally Posted by Joe Crosbie View Post

        It must of been a lot of work, were you launching / running your business while in further education?
        Yes, I started at the beginning of my second year of college. (And therefore did fewer business hours for the first two years of my business than after that.)

        Originally Posted by Joe Crosbie View Post

        My only issue with it is the way they teach it, after all research shows that everyone learns differently yet we are all taught in the same way?
        Yes, you have a point there. We had lectures, seminars, some audio-visual things (not many) and of course books. I think people more or less have to be able to learn from either lectures or books (if not both), to get on well with tertiary education, anyway. Sorry - I was only being cheeky, choosing to reply to your sig-file as well as your post, anyway.


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      • Originally Posted by Joe Crosbie View Post

        Of course, I've heard of the rule. I was just curious as it seems many people with hugely successful email lists are succeeding even when asking for a first name. Take Pat Flynn, from Smart Passive Income for example.
        Yes, so does Daniel Levis (email alchemy) Andre Chapron (autoresponder madness) Brendan Burchard, and many more big names... ask for name & email.

        I doubt if many well-to-do mature people would complain they've been tricked when their name is used in an email. I would expect the whiners and complainers to kick up a fuss though (like the guy above who says he HATES people who use his name). I doubt anybody would want him as client.

        So if it means we lose those people in the process, I'm definitely all for it. Some folk are more trouble than their worth.

        Anyway, one way is not more profitable than the other. It's all in the presentation. For example: A solo ad seller using my name in an email would hold absolutely n weight, but Brendan Burchard might. It's not as if I'm going to sit there and say "hey, I'm being tricked here." I mean, who the bloody hell thinks like that? I'll tell you who does. People who consistently whine and bitch no matter what you send them.

        The only way to know which way works for you, is to test it. I have - and I can tell you, for me, asking for the name is more profitable over time. Sometimes I will just ask for an email. I'll then grab their name later on when they buy something from me.

        Again, it's all about testing. What works for one doesn't mean it will work for another. We're not in science labs.

        Declan.
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  • Profile picture of the author pnglifesolutions
    it really depends on the industry you working with.

    In IM/MMO niche, forget about name. get the email and move on. Period.

    In real estate (where I was once actively doing), the potential buyers/sellers are somewhat more open to entering their names (and couple more details) since there is high likelihood you will meet them in person if the initial engagement went well.

    just my 2 cents.
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  • Profile picture of the author Stuart Walker
    I only ask for email because most people know that it's a autoresponder message and not really a personal email to them.

    There are much more ways to get personal and build a relationship with your subscribers than using their name in every email.

    Such as encouraging people to reply to emails to ask questions or telling stories / insights into your life.

    This helps people build up trust and get to know you much more than just using their name in every email.

    I see a lot of bloggers asking for name and email then sending totally impersonal emails like "Hey guys, how are you all doing today?".

    What's the point in asking for name in that case?
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