Why do you clean up your list?

19 replies
I have heard about alot of people talking about cleaning there lists, but i don't really get way.

Just because a person haven't opened any of your emails for the last 3 months, how do you know they will not open the next one? And even buy something?

Why would i remove those people just because they haven't opened my emails for awhile?
#clean #list
  • Profile picture of the author discrat
    Originally Posted by Edlund88 View Post

    I have heard about alot of people talking about cleaning there lists, but i don't really get way.

    Just because a person haven't opened any of your emails for the last 3 months, how do you know they will not open the next one? And even buy something?

    Why would i remove those people just because they haven't opened my emails for awhile?
    Some people do so because it can cut down on Overhead costs associated with running an Email Marketing Business.

    Most ESPs raise your monthly Cost per Amount of Subscribers on your List.

    For instance, Aweber jacks it up to from $20 to $30 per month after 500 Subs. on your List.

    So if 200 people on that List are not Opening your emails after a few months why do you want to pay an extra $120 year for dead weight ??



    - Robert Andrew
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    • Profile picture of the author Lucian Lada
      Originally Posted by discrat View Post

      Some people do so because it can cut down on Overhead costs associated with running an Email Marketing Business.

      Most ESPs raise your monthly Cost per Amount of Subscribers on your List.

      For instance, Aweber jacks it up to from $20 to $30 per month after 500 Subs. on your List.

      So if 200 people on that List are not Opening your emails after a few months why do you want to pay an extra $120 year for dead weight ??
      I don't agree with what you're saying.

      First, open-rate tracking isn't accurate enough to warrant such measures. One of the reasons is that tracking is measured by a 1x1-pixel transparent image that is added to HTML emails. When the image is loaded in the reader's email client, Aweber registers the email as open. The thing is, many people avoid loading images in email due to security reasons, so those email won't register as opened.

      Also, plain emails cannot be tracked for open-rates, and some people still read their emails in plain-text format. Source: https://help.aweber.com/entries/2175...te-Definition-

      Bottom line: you risk deleting people who are actually opening your emails, meaning you can actually lose money.

      Secondly, overheads should not be a problem for any decent marketer, even with Aweber who are not the cheapest ESP on the market. Simply put, if saving $120 a year is a big deal, you have bigger problems.

      $120 works out at just $10 a month, which is peanuts and not worth the effort. Plus, for the extra $10 a month, Aweber lets you add up to 2,500 people to your list, which is a very good deal. If I were in this situation, I'd look for ways to grow my list so I can earn more money, rather than trim it down to save two cups of coffee per month.
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      • Profile picture of the author discrat
        Originally Posted by Lucian Lada View Post

        I don't agree with what you're saying.

        First, open-rate tracking isn't accurate enough to warrant such measures. One of the reasons is that tracking is measured by a 1x1-pixel transparent image that is added to HTML emails. When the image is loaded in the reader's email client, Aweber registers the email as open. The thing is, many people avoid loading images in email due to security reasons, so those email won't register as opened.

        Also, plain emails cannot be tracked for open-rates, and some people still read their emails in plain-text format. Source: https://help.aweber.com/entries/2175...te-Definition-

        Bottom line: you risk deleting people who are actually opening your emails, meaning you can actually lose money.

        Secondly, overheads should not be a problem for any decent marketer, even with Aweber who are not the cheapest ESP on the market. Simply put, if saving $120 a year is a big deal, you have bigger problems.

        $120 works out at just $10 a month, which is peanuts and not worth the effort. Plus, for the extra $10 a month, Aweber lets you add up to 2,500 people to your list, which is a very good deal. If I were in this situation, I'd look for ways to grow my list so I can earn more money, rather than trim it down to save two cups of coffee per month.

        For the most part I agree with you Lucian.

        Actually, there was nothing to disagree with what I was saying. I was just stating some reasons why there are a select number of people who trim their List because of this reason. Whether that be wrong or right.

        Your right, I mean sooner or later I would hope those people would want to pay extra $10 month to get up to 2,500 Subscribers

        - Robert Andrew
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  • Profile picture of the author Edlund88
    Ah right that is true. Never thought about that.
    Thanks
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    I don't worry too much about open rates. I do worry about clicks, though. My emails usually offer a mix of free and paid resources, and all the links are tracked. If someone goes months without even clicking on the free stuff (some of which is purely entertainment, like a relevant movie clip or meme), then the odds are I didn't connect with that person.

    Periodically, I'll send that sub-group a message asking what went south and offering a gift for responding. Those that respond, stay. Those that don't, go.

    For me, it has nothing to do with economics. It's more a mental thing. Pruning out the people I didn't connect with helps me concentrate on the ones I did connect with instead of obsessing over why people dropped out.
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    • Profile picture of the author Javisito
      Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

      I don't worry too much about open rates. I do worry about clicks, though. My emails usually offer a mix of free and paid resources, and all the links are tracked. If someone goes months without even clicking on the free stuff (some of which is purely entertainment, like a relevant movie clip or meme), then the odds are I didn't connect with that person.

      Periodically, I'll send that sub-group a message asking what went south and offering a gift for responding. Those that respond, stay. Those that don't, go.

      For me, it has nothing to do with economics. It's more a mental thing. Pruning out the people I didn't connect with helps me concentrate on the ones I did connect with instead of obsessing over why people dropped out.
      Couldn't said it better myself.

      I always make a search within my autoresponder of people who never opened or clicked an email and remove them.

      I actually learned this the hard way when I noticed that a lot of subscribers "never opened an email" But had clicked a lot of links
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  • Profile picture of the author Ben Holmes
    John put his finger on it... it certainly would be foolish to delete subscribers based on open rate, which as Lucien correctly pointed out, isn't very accurate.

    But tracking actual clicks on the links is VERY accurate. And if someone never clicks on links, then they are simply dead weight.
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  • Profile picture of the author BobyRurka
    I do clean up only to remove duplicates and non-deliverables.
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  • Profile picture of the author lukeguy
    The best way to clean up is simply ask people to unsubscribe if they're not interesting in your content anymore. Tell them it won't hurt your feelings. That's the best way to clean the list. You want your list to be active and craving your next email.
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    • Profile picture of the author Terrance01
      Originally Posted by lukeguy View Post

      The best way to clean up is simply ask people to unsubscribe if they're not interesting in your content anymore. Tell them it won't hurt your feelings. That's the best way to clean the list. You want your list to be active and craving your next email.
      Extreemly good point....as far a I'm concerned, there are only two ways off of my list..unsubscribe or undeliverable.

      Even if they have never clicked or even opened..."Time and Circumstance" may make them a buyer in the future. Perhaps moving them to different list would be wiser...a long term "farming list". As sub-list of the one they have subscribed to. Then you could approach that particular list in a different way.

      Just a thought,
      To your Success
      -Terrance
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  • Profile picture of the author Developer99
    With those using emails that have set up for a freely then forget about using it, I would delete after 6 months
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  • Profile picture of the author skyro
    You clean to cut cost. If your autoresponder charges 20 for 1 to 1000 and 40 for 1000+ to 2000 and you have 1000 active subscriber and just one unsubscribe in, you will be charge the 40 because
    You didnt clean out that one unsubscribe.
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  • Profile picture of the author alanborcic
    Another reason is to increase your deliverability, because Google, Yahoo, MSN, etc tracks your open rate. The lower your open rate, the more chance is that your email will end in spam folder.

    Do test your self. Open test email addresses in Gmail, Yahoo, Outloook and AOL and try to send email that will land in inbox in all 4 providers. It almost never happens.

    There is whole science behind sending emails, making sure that subject lines are not spammy, that your email domain is not blacklisted.

    Here is the link for testing subject lines, FREE Email Subject Line Tester

    Here is the link for testing whether your email domain is blacklisted, MultiRBL.valli.org - Blacklist, Whitelist and FCrDNS check tool

    The problem with asking your list to unsubscribe is that message will be seen only by people who open your email, and you want to get rid of those who don't open it

    Tracking who clicked on a link in your email is also html based. Not to mention there are browser add-ons that will let you preview link without actually opening it.

    So I am afraid there is no definite answer. Is there a chance that someone who hasn't opened your email in last 12 months will buy something from you? Yes, but very minimal.

    I personally clean up my email list from people who hasn't opened my email in last 90 days.
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  • Profile picture of the author Corey Taylor
    Originally Posted by Edlund88 View Post

    I have heard about alot of people talking about cleaning there lists, but i don't really get way.

    Just because a person haven't opened any of your emails for the last 3 months, how do you know they will not open the next one? And even buy something?

    Why would i remove those people just because they haven't opened my emails for awhile?
    1) To pay less to your email service.

    2) Since they're not interested in your information, why keep them in the first place?

    3) Ask them if they're following you 3 times, per 2 days. If they open the email ask them what you can do to be better and the reason they're not interested.

    4) Be better. Improve.

    Start from scratch.

    Do not be afraid to delete your subscribers if they're not interested.
    Don't take it personally, it's just how things are, just improve and keep building a quality list with quality emails too.
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  • Profile picture of the author beserious
    removing emails who just have not opened is not main thing... Main is some emails gets offline and emails start bouncing so you need to remove those emails.. so to keep email list clean people use to cleanup their list regularly to get good sender reputation...
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  • Profile picture of the author ProducerK
    You could also use companies like:
    ImpressionWise
    EHygenics
    Sift Logic
    Bridge Marketing

    All these companies can clean up your email marketing lists.
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  • Profile picture of the author cashcowonline
    I think cleaning your list is not a bad idea after all. There are folks who don't even remember that they signed up. Additionally, e-mail addresses may change or get deleted. These issues may cause more unsubscribes or bounces. You may also end up getting spam complaints from a stale list. So, cleaning your list once in a while is not bad thing at all.
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  • Profile picture of the author ninosem
    The most important reason to clean email list is as @alanborcic said deliverability reason....
    Nost of our subscribers use Google, Yahoo, MSN..accounts
    They tracks open rate. If your open rate is low the more chance is that your email will end in spam folder.

    I personally delete unopens....
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  • Profile picture of the author askreviewbonus
    is there any software to clean up your list?

    I think it's better than service when it comes to a very big data.
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