Why Being Master Of Several Skills Is Better Than Being Master Of One

by amuro
17 replies
From time to time, I see postings about why it is better to be master of one trade than jack of all trades and master of none.

Or even the Power Of One using Bruce Lee as a prime example.

I have different view from this.

Let me evaluate why.

While it is best to master one skill at a time, it is not best to stick to that one skill if you are already a master.

Some people tend to get emotional as in being proud and even complacent in what they have achieved -

That they refused to stay open and learn new skills that can help them to be better.

Truth being said, as years come, changes are inevitable.

Unless what you do has a high perceived value to the society like chefs, doctors, drivers e-commerce, you have to be open to learning and mastering new skills as technological evolution comes about.

Jobs like cleaning, corporate, insurance, properties and even retail will be soon be a thing of the past.

Here is my formula.

It is called Pomodo - a Japanese technique I learn from established manga and story writers.

It means mastering one skill at a time and once you are really good in it, go and master another skill.

Though being a master of one is good, it is better to be a master of 1, 2 and even 3 should what you know does not work in case.

Germany and Italian national teams are the prime examples given their performances of defending and counterattacking as a team in recent Euro 2016 matches.
#master #skills
  • Profile picture of the author ViralAccounts
    I guess that would also depend what skills you are talking about. Mastering something else will mean that you will fall behind on your first skill (most likely). It's all about balance (to me)
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    Because viral accounts for something :)

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  • Profile picture of the author trobo
    It's funny, because I was just thinking about this very thing the other day.

    While we often hear the advice of being a master of one trade verses a jack of all - when someone is just starting out, they usually have no choice but to do just about every task themselves.

    If they don't know how to do something, they often have to learn the basics of how it's done instead of hiring a specialist.

    Sure, the specialist can obviously do a better job. But a new internet marketer is usually on a very tight budget, so a compromise has to be made.

    I've heard it said many times - the small business owner must wear many hats.
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  • Profile picture of the author danieldesai
    Originally Posted by amuro View Post

    Here is my formula.

    It is called Pomodo - a Japanese technique I learn from established manga and story writers.

    It means mastering one skill at a time and once you are really good in it, go and master another skill.
    Nice.

    Since we're on the topic, here's another Japanese business philosophy one should consider...

    Kaizen - a philosophy of continuous improvement where you always try to do at least one thing more efficiently every day.

    That's the abridged meaning but there's so much more to Kaizen than that if you look at it in depth.

    Daniel
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  • Profile picture of the author discrat
    Nothing wrong with Mastering several things in Life...as long as you do it one at a time.
    Of course if you have family and kids that could sometimes be a challenge


    - Robert Andrew
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  • Profile picture of the author TrickyDick
    One could certainly "master" several things that are neither complex nor dynamic.

    For example, the following:

    Mastering Copywriting will take thousands of hours of learning and practice... few have the patience and discipline to invest the time to achieve "mastery."

    Mastering Web Development.... completely impossible... by the time you "master" a single technology, ten new technologies have emerged....

    Of all of the people I've met in my Professional career, the least competent are those who claim to have "mastered" many things.....

    As a successful Entrepreneur, one must have knowledge in many areas. You'd be hard pressed to find a successful Entrepreneur who has "mastered" many complex or dynamic areas.

    I'm sure William Henry Gates III knows a lot about business...... But, I wouldn't want him doing my corporate taxes.
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  • Profile picture of the author BigFrank
    Banned
    I'm an old man and the only thing that I have mastered in life, yet still have much to learn, is something that I have been doing since I was eight years old.

    To 'master' something is an extremely relative and subjective term.

    There is absolutely nothing wrong with being a 'Jack of all trades and master of none.' Most people are happy if they can find someone that is actually competent at what they claim to be good at. I have never required the services of a master of anything in my entire life.

    I won't even require a master undertaker. Just don't smear the friggin' lipstick.

    Cheers. - Frank
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  • Profile picture of the author dburk
    What?

    Is this another low quality article dump?

    Hi amuro,

    I never heard of " Pomodo - a Japanese technique", but hey, I'm not from Japan. I wondered if you confused it with the very popular Pomodoro Technique (Not from Japan) so I looked it up in Google, and apparently Google has never heard of a japanese technique called "Pomodo" either, but hey what does Google Search know anyway, right?

    Anyway, the Pomodoro technique, developed by Francesco Cirillo, an Italian productivity expert, currently living in Germany, takes the extreme opposite viewpoint. Pointing out that multitasking is a huge productivity killer and the Pomodoro Technique is designed to break you of the habit of multitasking so that you can focus an a singular task long enough to develop a state of flow.

    By the way, the original research documentation on Flow was done by a group of researchers based in Italy, where they are still considered the foremost experts on this topic.

    Let's give credit where credit is due. Italians are the leading pioneers in this productivity research, not the Japanese. "Pomodoro" is the italian word for "tomato", which just happens to be the style of kitchen timer Cirillo used when developing this technique.


    p.s. No Japanese, Italians, or Germans were harmed during the making of this reply.
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    • Profile picture of the author amuro
      Originally Posted by dburk View Post

      What?

      Is this another low quality article dump?

      Hi amuro,

      I never heard of " Pomodo - a Japanese technique", but hey, I'm not from Japan. I wondered if you confused it with the very popular Pomodoro Technique (Not from Japan) so I looked it up in Google, and apparently Google has never heard of a japanese technique called "Pomodo" either, but hey what does Google Search know anyway, right?

      Anyway, the Pomodoro technique, developed by Francesco Cirillo, an Italian productivity expert, currently living in Germany, takes the extreme opposite viewpoint. Pointing out that multitasking is a huge productivity killer and the Pomodoro Technique is designed to break you of the habit of multitasking so that you can focus an a singular task long enough to develop a state of flow.

      By the way, the original research documentation on Flow was done by a group of researchers based in Italy, where they are still considered the foremost experts on this topic.

      Let's give credit where credit is due. Italians are the leading pioneers in this productivity research, not the Japanese. "Pomodoro" is the italian word for "tomato", which just happens to be the style of kitchen timer Cirillo used when developing this technique.

      The Pomodoro Technique® - YouTube

      p.s. No Japanese, Italians, or Germans were harmed during the making of this reply.
      Dirk,

      I think you got the wrong idea of what I am saying.

      I am not saying you go and learn several things when you haven't mastered one yet.

      What I am talking about is once you mastered one skill, go and master another skill to make yourself better and progress further.

      For example if you are already good in list building and affiliate marketing, you can go ahead and learn product creation or even SEO.

      Or whatever you want to accomplish.
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  • Profile picture of the author christinehopkin
    Always remember one thing "Quality is better tha Quantity".

    So, I would like to say that either you are doing one or ten tasks in a day, perfection is must. Don`t overload because it effects your performance. If you need best internet marketing services then VirtueNetz is a good place for designing, development, ecommerce etc.
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    Research Executive at VirtueNetz

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  • Profile picture of the author George Schwab
    OP i absolutely agree with you,

    in my life i have to move on every 10 years or so,
    not because i have to, its because i get bored with one skill

    i like to venture out and do it again from a different angle and subject.

    life would be too boring without constant change, you need new challenges
    or you become stagnant and ignorant. thats the problem with most of humanity.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jill Carpenter
    Originally Posted by amuro View Post

    [FONT=Philosopher][SIZE=3]

    Dirk,

    I think you got the wrong idea of what I am saying.
    I'm confused too.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=pomo...omodo+japanese

    Also, I think it's good to eventually go specialize in a skill. You position yourself as the "go to person for x " and you are not spreading yourself too thin.

    While it is best to master one skill at a time, it is not best to stick to that one skill if you are already a master.
    For some it is. If I master copy writing for example, why am I going to worry my head about mastering link building when I can spend my time copy writing and making lots of money from that? I could make more money for my time which could be spent on hiring a master link builder.
    Signature

    "May I have ten thousand marbles, please?"

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  • Profile picture of the author Oziboomer
    The recognition that many traditional employment paradigms are being shattered everyday and being replaced by new industries that just a decade ago would have only been thought of as science fiction.

    There are many merits of continuous improvement and most manufacturing based businesses embrace continuous improvement or utilising the theory of constraints to modify their operations. Many would also embrace lean manufacturing https://www.lean.org

    There is always a resistance to change and often this resistance is greatest by the "masters" of any skill.

    The ability of the successful amongst us is to know both how to manage their current situation and skills and also recognise and prepare to develop new skills to survive in the future when required.

    If you asked me 10 years ago would I have revenue generated online exceeding my very successful offline business I would have said "No way!"

    If you would have asked me what digital skills I had a decade ago I would have told you I could use email and I understood basic HTML.

    If you asked me a decade ago what skills I would have been thinking of learning you could have put understanding social media, PPC, coding, etc at the bottom of the list...

    ...but today?

    The ability to adapt, learn and change and in particular to become familiar with how vital it is to embrace new skills whether that be via the entrepreneurial path of employing people who have the abilities you don't possess or via continuous self-improvement is vital for long term success given the rate of change we experience during the digital age.

    Best regards,

    Ozi
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    • Profile picture of the author George Schwab
      Originally Posted by Oziboomer View Post


      If you asked me 10 years ago would I have revenue generated online exceeding my very successful offline business I would have said "No way!"
      Well, same experience here, but i did expect it actually. The potential was there from the beginning,
      all what was needed was belief in it and do it. Big step, big change, but well worth it.

      I actually believed in so much that I burned the bridges behind me, and fired my last customer in the offline biz. I came over to live on an island near you and started to export handicrafts to a Dutch guy in Europe. He ordered weekly but was such a pain in the a because he called us daily to make tiny
      changes in his orders. Until he finally went bonkers to give very complicated orders for single pieces for his next trade show. Well we made them without any profit, all his designs, and then he sold nothing. Then he ordered another set of complicated things.I fired him.

      And NEVER looked back. One decade ended, A better one started.
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  • Profile picture of the author patojag
    I think I'm a master in a lot of things but I still acknowledge that I still have plenty of things and there are 'specialists' that I cannot match.

    I believe that in order to become effective in an abstract concept like internet marketing, you need to be a "master" of many things.

    Being a master is subjective anyway, I am a master web developer to some but I can also be a noob to some people.
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  • Profile picture of the author Zodiax
    Your claims that insurance and retail will be a thing of the past are unsubstantiated.

    No evidence for your claims, just a baseless opinion
    Signature

    'I hated every minute of training, but I said, 'Don't quit. Suffer now and live the rest of your life as a champion'
    -Muhammad Ali

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  • Profile picture of the author amuro
    Hey guys,

    Thank you for your comments and feedback.

    Whichever you choose or whether you agree with me or not, I will say it is all in YOUR mind.

    You might have heard this saying.

    If you think you can, you can.
    If you think you can't, you can't.
    But whether you think you can or you can't,
    You are right.


    In other words, if you believe mastering and sticking to one skill is all you need to achieve success, you are right.

    If you believe in being open and learning different skills - mastering one at a time until you become versatile - you are also right.

    Here is the video of Tony Robbins to give you the better understanding of what i mean and why I said that.


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  • Profile picture of the author smartprofitmoney
    Originally Posted by amuro View Post

    From time to time, I see postings about why it is better to be master of one trade than jack of all trades and master of none.

    Or even the Power Of One using Bruce Lee as a prime example.

    I have different view from this.

    Let me evaluate why.

    While it is best to master one skill at a time, it is not best to stick to that one skill if you are already a master.

    Some people tend to get emotional as in being proud and even complacent in what they have achieved -

    That they refused to stay open and learn new skills that can help them to be better.

    Truth being said, as years come, changes are inevitable.

    Unless what you do has a high perceived value to the society like chefs, doctors, drivers e-commerce, you have to be open to learning and mastering new skills as technological evolution comes about.

    Jobs like cleaning, corporate, insurance, properties and even retail will be soon be a thing of the past.

    Here is my formula.

    It is called Pomodo - a Japanese technique I learn from established manga and story writers.

    It means mastering one skill at a time and once you are really good in it, go and master another skill.

    Though being a master of one is good, it is better to be a master of 1, 2 and even 3 should what you know does not work in case.

    Germany and Italian national teams are the prime examples given their performances of defending and counterattacking as a team in recent Euro 2016 matches.
    Hello,

    Well I test and build almost everything you see out for im marketing, so more is better,
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