Is Using Fake Testimonials Illegal?

56 replies
Hello Everyone,

I was wondering is using fake testimonials is illegal. I am just asking because I see them on almost every health websites.
#fake #illegal #testimonials
  • Profile picture of the author waihon
    It might or might not be illegal but it's definitely unethical to use fake testimonials.
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  • Profile picture of the author TheRichJerksNet
    Not a lawyer and we are dealing with world wide law anyways... As for ethics, that depends upon what your ethics are...

    Should you use fake testimonials ?? Not in my opinion... If you want to be seen as someone fake then go right ahead but many many people can see through fake testimonials... It boils down to credibility...

    James
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  • Profile picture of the author Clint
    There are no laws as such against fake testimonials but there are laws against gaining a monetary advantage by deception.

    "Fake" testimonials - Dev Shed

    This is what I know. Hope it helps.

    Clint S.
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    • Profile picture of the author Kevin AKA Hubcap
      Got a quick question.

      What's the difference between a commercial (using actors) that advertises a product and a fake testimonial?

      Kevin
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      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
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        • Profile picture of the author Kevin AKA Hubcap
          It just seems like two sides of the same coin. I can pay someone to be on a nationally televised tv spot and say they use my product (when they don't) but I can't pay someone to say the same thing on a sales page.

          Kevin


          Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

          Case-law. (In Europe and the US, anyway).

          One's an attempt to obtain a pecuniary advantage by deception and the other isn't, according to the courts.
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      • Profile picture of the author jedijames
        Originally Posted by Kevin AKA Hubcap View Post

        Got a quick question.

        What's the difference between a commercial (using actors) that advertises a product and a fake testimonial?

        Kevin
        Yes that would interest me to.
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        • Profile picture of the author rosetrees
          I've a feeling most commercials are along the lines of - this product/service does xyz. If an actor is talking about the benefits they've gained, they rarely give their name - they are acting out a scenario. (Yes, I know some celebs advertise, but I've a feeling they might have to have some tie with the product)

          Testimonials say I (the testifier) have USED this produce and this is MY opinion.
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          • Profile picture of the author Lance K
            Testimonials are about boosting credibility through social proof.

            I can't see how faking social proof in an attempt to boost credibility could be considered anything but a big fat oxymoron.

            Regardless of legality, it's a terrible idea.
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      • Profile picture of the author CDarklock
        Originally Posted by Kevin AKA Hubcap View Post

        What's the difference between a commercial (using actors) that advertises a product and a fake testimonial?
        In the commercial, the testimonial is real - they've just hired an actor to say it. If a customer says "I love your product, it saved my life," you can hire an actor to say "I love your product, it saved my life" because it is still a real testimonial given by a real customer.
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  • Profile picture of the author psresearch
    Originally Posted by jedijames View Post

    Hello Everyone,

    I was wondering is using fake testimonials is illegal. I am just asking because I see them on almost every health websites.
    I think it's OK as long as they put a really hard to read disclaimer in a greyed out font in a 6 point font size way at the bottom of the page after at least a screenfull of empty space that says, "All the stuff on this page is completely made up and is basically a bunch of nonsense".

    Disclaimer for this post:































    I am not an attorney and this is not an official legal opinion.
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    • Profile picture of the author Adam Carn
      Originally Posted by markquinn View Post

      I think it's OK as long as they put a really hard to read disclaimer in a greyed out font in a 6 point font size way at the bottom of the page after at least a screenfull of empty space that says, "All the stuff on this page is completely made up and is basically a bunch of nonsense".

      Disclaimer for this post:































      I am not an attorney and this is not an official legal opinion.
      LOL that made me laugh.
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    • Profile picture of the author Clint
      Originally Posted by markquinn View Post

      I think it's OK as long as they put a really hard to read disclaimer in a greyed out font in a 6 point font size way at the bottom of the page after at least a screenfull of empty space that says, "All the stuff on this page is completely made up and is basically a bunch of nonsense".

      Disclaimer for this post:































      I am not an attorney and this is not an official legal opinion.

      5 years ago people would have believed that I was practically advise.

      Oh how times change.....

      Clint S.
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    • Profile picture of the author bobsilber
      Originally Posted by markquinn View Post

      I think it's OK as long as they put a really hard to read disclaimer in a greyed out font in a 6 point font size way at the bottom of the page after at least a screenfull of empty space that says, "All the stuff on this page is completely made up and is basically a bunch of nonsense".

      Disclaimer for this post:































      I am not an attorney and this is not an official legal opinion.
      ROFLMAO - Great One
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  • Profile picture of the author Andyhenry
    Forget what other people are doing - YOU know it's wrong, so the decision about what you do is yours.
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    nothing to see here.

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  • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
    Banned
    The FTC and the ad networks/publishers are cracking down on them. You could probably also lose your Adwords acct depending on what you are promoting as Google is also cleaning house.
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  • Profile picture of the author AvidAZ
    It's not illegal and sadly most businesses write their own testimonials and product reviews. However, it is illegal to give a false testimony against a product that is untrue as the company could sue you for damages.
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    • Profile picture of the author Tsnyder
      Originally Posted by AvidAZ View Post

      It's not illegal and sadly most businesses write their own testimonials and product reviews. However, it is illegal to give a false testimony against a product that is untrue as the company could sue you for damages.
      I don't know where you live, my friend, but in the good old
      US of A it is most definitely illegal to use fake testimonials as
      an inducement to purchase.

      If the FTC... or state/local authorities... ever investigate your
      business you better have those testimonials on file with verifiable
      contact info for the individuals.

      Tsnyder
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  • Profile picture of the author BrianMcLeod
    There's a huge difference between having a celebrity spokesperson
    and a Google image pasted into a johnson box with a made-up name
    and completely fabricated story designed solely to deceive the consumer.

    In large part, the bottom line comes down to how the advertisement
    is perceived by the average, reasonable consumer as defined by the FTC.

    However, the "net impression of a reasonable consumer" is dangerously vague.

    What you say, how you say it, where you say, when you say it,
    all of these are subject to interpretation. They are viewed through
    the lens of the advertiser's overall pattern of conduct as judged by
    the government.

    If you have a pattern of complaints from consumers... and your
    testimonials are fake... and you fail to make proper disclosures
    where mandated... all of that colors the "net impression of a
    reasonable consumer" and is weighed against you.

    If you have an spokesmodel or actor singing the praises of your offer
    without proper disclosure, but have an otherwise compliant advertisement...
    that's going to change the equation, significantly in some ways.

    IMO, the documentation now required for compliant use of virtually
    any testimonial is onerous and many of us can only watch and wait
    to see the first application of the FTC's new "teeth".

    From my perspective, the new testimonial guidelines are not
    particularly intended to bring more cases, but to grind those
    brought into a finer powder.

    Simple answer... treat fake testimonials as illegal and treat real
    testimonials as assets that require complete documentation.

    Best,

    Brian
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    • Profile picture of the author psresearch
      Originally Posted by BrianMcLeod View Post


      In large part, the bottom line comes down to how the advertisement
      is perceived by the average, reasonable consumer as defined by the FTC.

      However, the "net impression of a reasonable consumer" is dangerously vague.

      What you say, how you say it, where you say, when you say it,
      all of these are subject to interpretation. They are viewed through
      the lens of the advertiser's overall pattern of conduct as judged by
      the government.

      Best,

      Brian
      Yep. I specifically asked Lesley Fair, the Attorney at the FTC in charge of Business Education this:

      I just watched your informative 2007 staff presentation on Clear and
      Conspicuous disclosure. The only part I didn't quite understand
      was how the "net effect to consumers" is determined.

      Here was her answer:

      "Hi, Mr. Schlegel. You raise an interesting question about how the FTC determines the "net impression." Because the FTC deals daily with the question of what's deceptive, the Supreme Court has said that it has the expertise in most cases to make that determination: "As an administrative agency which deals continually with cases in the area, the Commission is often in a better position than are courts to determine when a practice is deceptive within the meaning of the Act. This Court has frequently stated that the Commission's judgment is to be given great weight by reviewing courts. This admonition is especially true with respect to allegedly deceptive advertising since the finding of a violation in this field rests so heavily on inference and pragmatic judgment."

      Sometimes the process depends on whether it's an express claim or a subtler implied claim. Here's how the United States Court of Appeals described the process in Kraft v. FTC: "In determining what claims are conveyed by a challenged advertisement, the Commission relies on two sources of information: its own viewing of the ad and extrinsic evidence. Its practice is to view the ad first and, if it is unable on its own to determine with confidence what claims are conveyed in a challenged ad, to turn to extrinsic evidence. The most convincing extrinsic evidence is a survey of what consumers thought upon reading the advertisement in question, but the Commission also relies on other forms of extrinsic evidence including consumer testimony, expert opinion, and copy tests of ads."

      One of the best summaries of what makes an advertising claim deceptive us the FTC's long-standing Deception Policy Statement: FTC POLICY STATEMENT ON DECEPTION

      I hope that answers your question, but please let me know if you're looking for more information. As I'm sure you know, we have lots of materials for consumers about evaluating business opportunities, including work-at-home offers: FTC : Business Opportunities And although we do have a YouTube channel with videos for consumers - YouTube - FTCvideos's Channel -- we haven't yet uploaded FTC legal presentations. But we are in the process of putting together some videos to help businesses comply with the law and help consumers protect themselves from rip-offs. Here's one 15-minute tutorial on data security for business to give you an idea of what we're starting to do: FTC -- Protecting Personal Information: A Guide for Business "

      Paul Schlegel/MarkQuinn
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Mayhew
    fake 1 (fk)
    adj.
    Having a false or misleading appearance; fraudulent.
    n.
    1. One that is not authentic or genuine; a sham.
    2. Sports A brief feint or aborted change of direction intended to mislead one's opponent or the opposing team.
    v. faked, fakĀ·ing, fakes
    v.tr.
    1. To contrive and present as genuine; counterfeit.
    2. To simulate; feign.
    3. Music To improvise (a passage).
    4. Sports To deceive (an opponent) with a fake. Often used with out.
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  • I don't know if this is helpful to anyone, but I try to make sure my material follows these guidelines.

    I am pretty sure it is in the process of being revised, but it is a good place to start...

    FTC GUIDES CONCERNING USE OF ENDORSEMENTS AND TESTIMONIALS IN ADVERTISING
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  • Profile picture of the author Colin Palfrey
    Why not do what everyone else does and give away free trial/samples in exchange for a review. I have reviewed a huge amount of products now and I do it because

    A:I get free stuff
    B:I get a link back to my site

    If you want a review post a topic like "Free samples/trial for warriors for review"
    It works!!
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    I write articles and eBooks - PM me for details!
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  • Profile picture of the author ourland
    Anything that is BAD han no two names other than
    it is BAD! Using FAKE testimony may bring in money
    for you in the short run BUT the long run effect ia such
    that you will be forcred out of the market.

    So in my opinion AVOID it at all cost.
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  • Profile picture of the author seoessex
    Come on man, everyone fakes testimonials or get their friends to write them.

    Just not many will admit it.
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  • Profile picture of the author handyman
    Not illegal but not ethical IMHO.
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  • Profile picture of the author Johnny12345
    Go to the FTC website and read some of their documents.

    I'm NOT an attorney, but it's my best guess that a fake testimonial is almost always illegal. If you make untrue statements to induce someone to buy, that's called fraud. (And for what other reason would you make a fake statement?) However, there is a difference between "puffery" (sales talk) and fraud.

    And even if it isn't illegal yet, there are very strict new rules pending. Even blogging and celebrity endorsements are under fire.

    If you use fake endorsements or testimonials you risk attracting the attention of the FTC, FDA or SEC. And that's something you don't want to do. Just ask Frank Kern -- he experienced the wrath of the FTC firsthand.

    The safest route to take is to err on the side of caution.

    Johnny
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  • Profile picture of the author thezone
    Originally Posted by jedijames View Post

    Hello Everyone,

    I was wondering is using fake testimonials is illegal. I am just asking because I see them on almost every health websites.
    Well....yeah...and depending on what is stated in the testimonial when it is proven to be false, you can be held civilly (and possibly criminally) liable.

    Let me give you a scenario.

    Maria claims to teach Tania and Oliver how to make money using "social media", in turn (to garner Maria's testimonial) both Oliver and Tania give testimonials of an exact monetary outcome based on the training. Oliver claims to be making 5 to 10K per day on twitter, and Tania claims to be making 5 digit months back to back since the training and making 24K in 5 days.

    Donna who also took the course, didn't find any benefit from the course (to the contrary, she feels the course and testimonials were false). So Donna takes the training modules and video testimonial as proof of deceptive advertising practices, and files a statement of claim for both actual and exemplary damages.

    Donna provides audio proof that Maria garnered "testimonials" using the premise that a testimonial would be seen by many on her list and claims it will give them an air of credibility. The fact that Maria states to fake it, and use streaming media sites in an attempt to hide unfavorable metrics which would make you not look like an expert, and the fact that the testimonials show a specific outcome and are used to garner credibility for Maria's course, they become admissible as evidence in the case against Maria.

    While Maria can claim she had no knowledge that the results in the testimonials were false, there is a preponderance (remember civil liability) of evidence that shows Maria acted in a complicit manner in a clear attempt to deceive (furthering her "credibility), based on her own teachings, it is easily arguable that she knowingly published falsified claims.

    Maria loses the civil aspect. Now in walks the FTC, who goes to Oliver and Tania, and a few others who Maria Garnered specific monetary testimonials from, and demands proof of advertised testimonials (guess who is going down...and who is going to save their ass). Maria believes an "earnings disclaimer" is going to save her ass, but everything that comes out of her own mouth, and is fully documented BS by both Audio and Video will take her down.

    Advertising and Marketing on the Internet: Rules of the Road



    here is two things people should be aware of

    Testimonials and Endorsements

    Testimonials and endorsements must reflect the typical experiences of consumers, unless the ad clearly and conspicuously states otherwise. A statement that not all consumers will get the same results is not enough to qualify a claim. Testimonials and endorsements can't be used to make a claim that the advertiser itself cannot substantiate.

    Connections between an endorser and the company that are unclear or unexpected to a customer also must be disclosed, whether they have to do with a financial arrangement for a favorable endorsement, a position with the company, or stock ownership. Expert endorsements must be based on appropriate tests or evaluations performed by people that have mastered the subject matter.
    See FTC Guides Concerning Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.


    -------
    The FTC Act prohibits unfair or deceptive advertising in any medium. That is, advertising must tell the truth and not mislead consumers. A claim can be misleading if relevant information is left out or if the claim implies something that's not true.
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  • Profile picture of the author Online Bliss
    When it comes to internet marketing I usually believe
    the testomonial of a well known marketer I have heard of.
    They would be putting their reputation in jeopardy.
    I wonder what would happen if there was a kind of feedback site or script like on ebay.
    Never mind, that might work with fellow marketers but not
    the general public.
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  • Profile picture of the author freudianslip27
    I was surprised at some auctions of Flippa that are for websites selling products like an ebook, and they are brand new and yet have testimonials all setup in them.

    What's up with that?

    Matt
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    • Profile picture of the author mrozlat
      Originally Posted by freudianslip27 View Post

      I was surprised at some auctions of Flippa that are for websites selling products like an ebook, and they are brand new and yet have testimonials all setup in them.

      What's up with that?

      Matt
      you take your product and you approach people in your industry to review it (critique it)... then ask for feedback... if it is good ask if you have permission to use it as a testimonial...

      if your critique suggests you make some changes... make the changes to improve your product and then get a positive response to use as a testimonial... that's the right way to go about it!
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  • Profile picture of the author James Pateman
    I think it's about 'sleep-easy-money'. That's where the money you make doesn't cause you to loose sleep about being 'found-out'

    regards,
    James Pateman
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  • Profile picture of the author claytons
    for what it's worth...Our legal team's advice for testimonials on our sales page is that...not only do they have to be real (of course), but we have to have some kind of documentation...that we check...of any revenue claims.

    That would include affiliate accounts, tax returns, 1099's etc.
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  • Profile picture of the author Louise Green
    I don't agree with using them, but I notice a couple of marketing 'gurus' encouraging it, which gives noobs the impression that it's ok.
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    • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
      Okay, saw one of those drug commercials one day and the person was
      saying how they took the drug and it helped their problem.

      I immediately recognized this guy as an actor from a daytime soap I watch.

      Unless this guy actually DOES use the drug, how the hell do these drug
      companies get away with doing this?

      That is what I would like to know?
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      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
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        • Profile picture of the author mrozlat
          Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

          The person isn't the same one, in other words, but the testimonial itself is a valid and proper one of which the original can be inspected at the company's home office on request by any interested party.
          Who decides on how valid the testimonial is? If it's on a TV ad... is it not "real" even though it is a celebrity endorsement where someone gets paid?

          I'm not sure what drug it was... but for example... panadol or something for a headache... who's going to prove that it did or didn't sure paris hilton's headache? From a marketing point of view, the company is stoked because the endorsement brings them sales and a massive cult following.

          If there really are bodies out there who think they can govern whether or not a testimonial is authentic are dreaming... not to say that it's right to fabricate these things, but is it wrong?

          Who's to say? If as a consumer I read a testimonial that highlights a benefit off the product that pushes my button to buy... and I get a great product, I am ofcourse grateful (whether "real" or "fake" testimonial). The thing is that that will never be reported or talked about, the thing that will be talked about if the proverbial hits the fan and a testimonial misleads the consumer into buying a crappy product (whether "real" or "fake" testimonial).

          But then again, if there are no testimonials used, and I miss out on a great product that would actually benefit me... wouldn't that be more unethical than having a fake testimonial that leads me to what I was looking for.
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      • Profile picture of the author CmdrStidd
        Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

        I immediately recognized this guy as an actor from a daytime soap I watch.
        Steve!?!?

        You shock me!! YOU watch soaps?

        I am flabbergasted! BTW, I personally like Bold and the Beautiful and The Young and the Restless. Which ones do you watch?

        LOL
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        • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
          Originally Posted by CmdrStidd View Post

          Steve!?!?

          You shock me!! YOU watch soaps?

          I am flabbergasted! BTW, I personally like Bold and the Beautiful and The Young and the Restless. Which ones do you watch?

          LOL
          All My Children and One Life To Live

          Watched Guiding Light until it went off the air on Friday.
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      • Profile picture of the author patfl
        Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post


        Unless this guy actually DOES use the drug, how the hell do these drug
        companies get away with doing this?

        That is what I would like to know?
        Well, they have tons of money, shark lawyers and lobby hard enough to be protected.

        Only the small players get screwed, like usual.

        Patrice
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    • Profile picture of the author CmdrStidd
      Originally Posted by Lovelylou View Post

      I don't agree with using them, but I notice a couple of marketing 'gurus' encouraging it, which gives noobs the impression that it's ok.
      Any 'gurus' encouraging this behaviour should be shot on site, no questions asked. Fake testimonials are so lame when all it takes is asking someone to try it and give their opinion of it. If a 'guru' is telling you to do something like this then he or she is not a guru at all. They are a fake and a fraud and a counterfeit. They are a wolf in sheep's clothing. Let me see, I know I am missing some other names for them but I just cant think of any more.

      You all feel free to add to my list of names for these kinds of 'gurus'.
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  • Profile picture of the author Laguna Beach Biz
    You can look at this in 3 ways:

    1. Is it legal? ... No

    The FTC Act's prohibition on "unfair or deceptive acts or practices" broadly covers advertising claims, marketing and promotional activities, and sales practices in general.

    2. If you think you're going to sell your product or service using posting fake testimonials and this is your marketing strategy ... You need to find a new line of work

    3. And here's the ethical question. How would you feel if the shoe's on the other foot? Would you like to get scammed by someone who set you up with fake testimonials?

    It's all about online reputation, building credibility and a long term business.
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  • Profile picture of the author jrmnlitt
    It may or may not be illegal but its wrong to mislead people who are trusting that you are real and up front about what you know or say you know, especially if money is involved.
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  • Profile picture of the author krishnaGopal
    I personally do not think its right to use fake testimonials ! theres too many crappy products being sold, then dont actually help the end-user, and are sometimes sucked into biting because of fake feedback ! It's happend to me so many times !
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  • Profile picture of the author HeyAdMan
    TOTALLY Unethical, plus how do you build credibility with a lie.

    Whenever I see testimonials with initials such as Bob L. or Sue K. ... what kind of testimonial is that if they are unwilling to even leave their name.

    Fake Testimonials ... Bad Idea!
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  • Profile picture of the author Daniel_Pereira
    you better believe that junk is illegal! And to tell you the truth, I am a bit afraid to promote almost any **** product out there right now because I do not want to associate myself with the garbage going on with that niche. Extremely scary! Just focus on doing things right and the money will eventually come. Don't try and get quick cash today by involving yourself in unethical and illegal practices.

    Daniel Pereira
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  • Profile picture of the author Neil Kieren
    Faking is an easy way to solve a problem. But it has its own bad side in the end so its up to your conscience really.
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    • Profile picture of the author frankm
      Here'a an example of the **** scams that are going on:

      Rachael Ray Blog I lost 47 lbs with my hectic life and these (FREE) products

      The photos are completely ludicrous and at the bottom of the page it says in dark writing:

      "Testimonials of individuals shown may be of fictitious persons or paid models and are not necessarily users of these products."

      Shame
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      • Profile picture of the author seasoned
        Originally Posted by frankm View Post

        Here'a an example of the **** scams that are going on:

        Rachael Ray Blog I lost 47 lbs with my hectic life and these (FREE) products

        The photos are completely ludicrous and at the bottom of the page it says in dark writing:

        "Testimonials of individuals shown may be of fictitious persons or paid models and are not necessarily users of these products."

        Shame
        WOW, I kind of like rachael ray. I hope she SUES! Maybe she DID, because it now says:

        I lost 47 lbs with my hectic life and these (FREE) products

        Several agencies HAVE made it tantamount to ILLEGAL to offer disclaimers in certain cases. The disclaimers on that site are a GOOD example! Unless you can see color REAL well, etc... you would NEVER see those disclaimers! But I have seen cases, like the LA county clerk that says DBAs must be at least a certain size in a certain section with a certain distribution for a certain amount of time.

        You just wait, if enough IDIOTS do what that site did, the FTC will soon codify something similar, if they haven't already. IMAGINE, it would basically become a statement admitting GUILT!

        Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author jaykay21089
    It's something that's being stamped on by the FTC. And ask yourself... is it something you'd condone anyway? Something you could live with on your conscience? Is making money online more important than the health of people?
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  • Profile picture of the author seasoned
    Originally Posted by jedijames View Post

    Hello Everyone,

    I was wondering is using fake testimonials is illegal. I am just asking because I see them on almost every health websites.
    It ALWAYS has been in the US, and the FTC recently made that VERY clear, and demanded better disclaimers.

    Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author guide4everything
    I think it is illegal
    Signature

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  • Profile picture of the author 900sal
    Totally illegal. And why would you bother putting fake testimonial? That's cheating...
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  • Profile picture of the author seasoned
    I have to tell you guys. I used to be a LITTLE too naive with some things. I actually bought some things based on people I KNEW to exist that I heard before, etc.... I did that EVEN though I have even heard FRIENDS praise something more than I thought it deserved.

    I for one no longer recognize such things. I AM appalled at how many here say giving false testimonials is the way things should be, and have to be, done, and encourage it.

    I hope all that do that get what is due them for it.

    Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author Kate C
    It is not only unethical to use fake testimonials but it is also bad business practice. Building a good ,solid and profitable business is is based on trust. Your customers need to trust you and your product. You cannot have fake testimonials just to make a quick buck. A business needs repeat customers to grow and this can only happen if they are satisfied enough to come back for more and also recommend your product to others. They should be the ones to give you real testimonials. Word of mouth is very powerful.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dave Hardin
    Let me answer your original question with a question.

    Does anyone really believe what is written in most testimonials?
    Recent studies indicate that "testimonial blindness" is fast catching up with "banner blindness" as marketing techniques that don't work as well as they once did.
    Don't take it from me; GOOGLE those terms and read the results for yourself.

    I read product reviews, but I never read testimonials, especially those that do not have a signature, or contact information.
    I will sometimes watch video testimonials which prove that I am Joe Average when compared to the recent studies.
    I would be embarrassed to tell you how many times I have been asked to write testimonials for marketers. No, I don't do that.

    Have you ever noticed how articulate most testimonial writers seem to be?
    Have you ever noticed how they all have the same "tone"? Wouldn't you expect to see some variation in composition?
    If I saw a testimonial that said, "Yestiday I wasn't no riter, but today I are one," I would tend to believe it was authentic - maybe not valuable, but authentic.

    How many times have you seen this testimonial? "I just bought this wonderful product and I know that it is going to make me $5317.43 by tomorrow!" Roughly interpreted, that testimonial says, "I haven't tried it yet".

    The flip side of that testimonial is the one that says, "This product has earned me $5317.43 in the past 24 hours. I love this marketer and intend to name my first born child after him." Now that is a real testimonial and is absolutely true. Of course it was written by the marketer's pregnant wife, but at least it is true.

    I apologize for the rant. I guess my response to the question of using fake testimonials is - don't do it. Your time would be better spent split testing your ads, or tweaking your sales page. Unless you are just doing hit and run marketing your lies will catch up with you.
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  • Profile picture of the author kenny5
    I hate it when people do this. There product isn't good enough for actual people to put in a good word, so they have to make it up. People suck sometimes.
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