One or multiple affiliate products?

8 replies
Hi Warriors!

I have a question for you all.

I have a blog that gets a descent amount of search traffic to our pages so I placed several Clickbank affiliate banners throughout the content on the site.

Now here's the problem.

One offer is converting EXTREMELY well while the others aren't converting at all.

Should I abandon the other products and just promote this single high converting product?
#affiliate #multiple #products
  • Profile picture of the author expmrb
    There are many factors that may have responsible for this. As for example what are the prices range of the other products, did they have any demand for real, how is their competition and what are their conversion rates. After judging all these factors you consider removing them.
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    • Profile picture of the author NetJunkie913
      All of the products are in the women relationship and dating advice niche.

      If I remove the others would you just replace with this single high converting product and focus on that one?
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  • Profile picture of the author spartan14
    Well i dont see the point of promoting much offers if you have one that convert .Just keep the one thats convert ,dont do 10 things at once
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  • Profile picture of the author Rory Singh
    It all depends on what they are searching for. If I had a problem in the dating area of my life (God forbid because I have one woman...don't think I can handle more) and found your content...if your product may solve my problem then I most likely would buy.

    So the only way to find out is by using your common sense, gut and then test!
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnVianny
    Try to upsell and downsell other products to people who have bought the offer which converts so well.

    Then retarget them with fb ads if they dont buy.
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  • Profile picture of the author simon leach
    Have you researched the offers. We have what we called the 40/40/20 rule of response (Conversion). 40% is the Offer, 40% audience & 20% Creative...now before everyone gets their knockers in a twist the percentages are not really the point...its about targeting and the elements you need to balance.

    Of about equal and most paramount importance is that you match the audience to the offer...e.g. If someone wants/needs a purple wangdoozle and I offer them one or show them how I can easily get one, I will get a ton of response - Creative is secondary. As we all know red wangdoozles are quite similar but if your going to get me to buy that red one you better dazzle me with creative that explains why.

    Wow...this got out of hand. My general point being is you probably spend a lot of effort making sure your content addresses your audience. Make sure your doing the same amount of effort with your offers. And lastly always cut losers (or deploy them to a better target audience and see if they work then) and keep increasing exposure to winners untill they are no longer meeting your ROI (nothing is infinitely scaleable)
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  • Profile picture of the author AceOfShirts
    Maybe you should try replacing the lowest converting ads with ads for a different product.

    You might find a new product that converts even better than your current best converting offer.
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    Originally Posted by Connann View Post

    Try to upsell and downsell other products to people who have bought the offer which converts so well.

    Then retarget them with fb ads if they dont buy.
    There's a tiny problem with that, unless Clickbank has changed.

    People who buy products through Clickbank's affiliate links are Clickbank's customers. Affiliates have no clue who actually bought something, and therefore no way to do what you recommend.

    It's the same with many vendors. They are happy to pay affiliates for generating a new customer.

    But they want to be the ones making money on upsells, downsells and cross-sells. So they don't share buyer data with affiliates.
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