OMG...This Is A Bad Phishing Scam...Amazon

19 replies
I've seen some bad ones but this one is the worst.

I regularly order stuff from Amazon. Well, I got an email, just now, about
my latest Amazon order.

It looked authentic in every way. They copied Amazon's template to the
letter.

The only reason I knew it was a phishing email was because of the email
address it came to for the sale. I don't use that email for Amazon.

This one is VERY easy to mistake for legit if you just glance over it.

Be VERY careful.
#bad #omgthis #phising #scamamazon
  • Profile picture of the author DrewClement
    Thanks for the heads up Steven. I have been receiving the same type of email, along with a very well put together GoDaddy phishing email.

    ALmost every detail of the GoDaddy email is legit: header, phone number, logo, unsubscribe option everything.

    Only difference being that when you hover over the clickable link, you can see it would send you to a weird phishing site.


    Plus...I knew that I didnt buy $687 worth of .info domains...or else I may have been dupped....
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  • Profile picture of the author Matt Bard
    Thanks Steven,

    I would like to add that I have been getting some from the UPS too.

    They make it look like you have something being shipped to you but there is a problem with the order that you need to fix by providing your personal information.

    With all of the new ways and abilities to make these things look real, my response is to call, not email the company in regards to any problems with my account.

    The thing is that anytime you contact support you are asked to give your information as verification and maybe this is the time that companies have to start verifying for us too.

    They should have to answer a few verifying questions first before asking us.

    I don't know what the solution is but obviously, continuing to send very sensitive personal information back and forth by email is getting more dangerous every day.
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    • Profile picture of the author Trent Brownrigg
      Originally Posted by Matt M View Post

      Thanks Steven,

      I would like to add that I have been getting some from the UPS too.

      They make it look like you have something being shipped to you but there is a problem that needs to be cleared up.
      Yep, I have been getting this one too.

      I'm so tired of crap like this! Why can't people just run real businesses instead of trying to scam everyone?!
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  • Profile picture of the author Tim Franklin
    It does seem to be amazing how many of these fake emails get sent, I received the godaddy email myself, it was convincing, good to be careful.
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  • Profile picture of the author Bertil Jenner
    I almost got scammed as well by those Amazon emails as I had just ordered a few things from Amazon.

    But they are easy to spot once you notice they do not use your actual name in the fake email. They replace your name with your email.

    Also all of the email addresses they used seemed to have been scraped from a linking service I used 8 years ago.
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  • Profile picture of the author cdemar22
    What I find fascinating is how the phishers knew that you had recently purchased something on Amazon...or that you use Amazon, for that matter. I've seen very similar emails and they always seem to coincide with when I had recently purchased something and were allegedly in response to my recent purchase, even though they were phony.

    Any thoughts on how these people are doing that?
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    • Profile picture of the author jacktackett
      Originally Posted by cdemar22 View Post

      What I find fascinating is how the phishers knew that you had recently purchased something on Amazon...or that you use Amazon, for that matter. I've seen very similar emails and they always seem to coincide with when I had recently purchased something and were allegedly in response to my recent purchase, even though they were phony.

      Any thoughts on how these people are doing that?
      First - thanks for the heads up Steven.

      Next - to answer your question - they really aren't doing that - they're just playing the percentages. So many people order from amazon everyday that there's bound to be some overlap. I'm saying its just a coincidence, but as in most mental illusions, it seems to be deliberate.

      Just shows it pays to be vigilant.

      --Jack
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    • Profile picture of the author onuel
      I think 99% of Phishing email can easily be avoided just by checking the URL of the outgoing links in the email. Just make sure the root URL makes sense and spelled correctly,etc... Like www.payppal.com instead of www.paypal.com. Looks can be duplicated but not the root URL.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dan C. Rinnert
    Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

    This one is VERY easy to mistake for legit if you just glance over it.
    The mistake the scammers make is sending a dozen of these daily.

    The first one gets your attention. Once the others start flooding in, it's easier to figure out it's something fishy.

    Same with the GoDaddy phishing eMails. The first one grabbed my attention. The next dozen or so did not.

    Not sure why the scammers think I'm going to fall for the 12th one when I didn't fall for the first.
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  • Profile picture of the author Orator
    I'm so tired of crap like this! Why can't people just run real businesses instead of trying to scam everyone?!
    This is a business.

    Once spam was a bunch of newbie little kids with some cheap hacking software downloaded online. Now though, phishing scams are highly organized illegal businesses that make criminal groups a lot of money.

    These people makes a lot of bank by running these kinds of scams, they are intelligent, organized, and dangerous. It might not be a legal venture, but these people make tons of money doing it.

    The best you can do is to try to protect yourself, and warn the community.

    Excellent eye Steven, sounds to me like you got an e-mail from one of the better outfits.
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  • Profile picture of the author khanhdom
    yea, indeed it's a big business for them, although highly illegal
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    • Profile picture of the author airbusbarkley
      My Facebook account got hijacked along with my e-mail account and it was a total nightmare. The scammers e-mailed all of my contacts and told them I was being held outside the county and to Western Union funds for my rescue. They were even Instant Messaging my contacts on Facebook. They forwarded all of my e-mail to an gmail account. Facebook was great but Gmail support was horrible and ineffective.

      I have also received phishing emails from the scammers posing as Bank of America and PayPal. I usually forward the e-mails to the respective security and fraud dept. so the legitimate companies are aware. Be careful out there!
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  • Profile picture of the author MassiveMarketer
    Thanks Steven!

    Nowadays, you really wouldn't know unless you check all the details.
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  • Profile picture of the author Sheryl Polomka
    I have received both the Amazon email and the GoDaddy email and both of them sure did look like the real deal. I haven't purchased anything from Amazon for a while so I knew it had to be fake and the GoDaddy was for an order of $357 of .info domains - which I also knew I hadn't purchased.
    It is amazing just how real they look though, all the graphics and everything they use - amazing.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dalun
    can someone post an example or picture of this scam? i want to avoid such troubles
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  • Profile picture of the author MarketingSPY
    Thanks Steven - We'll let all our members know.

    Anytime anyone receives a phishing scam - you should report it to your fell Warriors forum.

    Thanks again Steven.

    Happy Trails!
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  • Profile picture of the author John Atkins
    Yeah some of these phishermen are getting really smart. I've seen
    ones like you mentioned, and I also get a lot for paypal, ebay
    & others. You really have to be careful on the net nowadays.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jamian
    Those who create phishing site's getting even better and smarter, that's why we should be careful of them.
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    www.SuperAffiliateMarketingTrick.com <<
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