What Do You All Think About Teen Marketers? Jealous? A Nuisance?

193 replies
How goes it Warriors?

I thought this would make for an interesting debate.

What do you all think about teen marketers?

Particularly the ones in the 13-17 year range...

The reason I ask, is because I was reading a thread about some 16 year old who was supposedly making millions of dollars online.

It seemed that everyone was either a bit jealous, or at least a bit skeptical.

Being skeptical is OK, but a lot of people were trying to put the person down because of their age.

'I don't believe it because kids that age are too busy worrying about other non important stuff'

Is it really that hard to believe that young kids these days can make a killing online?

What about that one 14 year old girl who made a million+ off those myspace layouts?

I mean certainly it is possible, and I speak from experience here.

When I was 16 I started a web hosting company and by the time I was 18 I did nearly $200,000 in business.

Now for web hosting, I can see the potential problem of a 16 year old running it. You know, people have their businesses running off the servers, the host could lose interest and run, etc.

But we're talking selling ebooks, digital goods, and affiliate commissions here...

Not so much that can go wrong there.

I just don't understand what all the fuss is about...

Shouldn't we be applauding these kids for doing something that most people never even attempt?

What are your thoughts?

-Dan Brock
#jealous #marketers #nuisance #teen
  • Profile picture of the author Shannon Spoon
    I think it is great! If i had access to the internet back when i was that age i probably would have gone that route. It is better than them being on the streets, getting involved in gangs, drugs or whatever.

    I applaud them and if i can give any advice (or if they can give me advice) contact me on Yahoo!
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    • Profile picture of the author MsDebra
      I agree with you. I teach a teen Sunday school class and teens are very intelligent. Our schools should be teaching entrepreneurship because teens today can handle being entrepreneurs and do an excellent job.
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  • Profile picture of the author KenThompson
    Hey Dan...

    Interesting topic and questions. I'll suppose you'll get the complete
    spectrum of responses from people.

    I think it's pretty cool in a lot of ways. I read about a very young
    guy from the inner city, Chicago maybe, and he was a millionaire by
    the time he was in his mid teens - I think. He has developed into an
    incredible public speaker, and he always tries to inspire other kids and
    young people from inner cities to try to succeed in life. He's a great
    example and is trying to serve a higher good. How can anyone put that
    down?

    Also, younger people have much more incredible opportunities than
    earlier generations. So they should try to make something of it - take
    advantage of it. I understand kids in high school are busy. But they
    basically do not have the same worries as adults with rent, mortgage,
    and other 'adult' type of responsibilities. So it's a great opportunity
    to hole-up in the bedroom and learn to make money. Why not?

    I think it's cool and applaud young punks like you. lol. Just kidding.

    Ken
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  • Profile picture of the author CDarklock
    Originally Posted by Daniel Brock View Post

    What do you all think about teen marketers?
    They lack vision. They simply don't have the ability to think years down the road.

    What they have is a fresh perspective. They can cut through a lot of garbage very quickly and see to the heart of a problem.

    As a teen myself, I did a lot of cool stuff. Same in my early 20s. But everything I ever did was flash-in-the-pan. I always thought "wow, this stuff is easy" and mouthed off about how easy it was - and then it all fell apart and I didn't know why.

    Now, newly into my 40s, I watch teens do the exact same crap I did and mouth off the exact same way I did and I know it's going to fall apart the exact same way it did for me... and then they disappear. And I know why, too.

    But I pay very close attention to them, because in certain ways, they're brilliant. They think more clearly than any of us. They can often see the flaw, the shining crack in the surface of the system that none of us old farts can see, and they can usually pry it open and pull a bunch of money out.

    If you listen, you can figure out how to do it, too.

    And if they'd listen, they'd learn how to keep it from falling apart on them.
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    • Profile picture of the author dika
      There is always some gifted kids who are clever enough to play the same games as the older "gurus". some cryptanalist who were able to break some powerfull algorithms were less than 16 years old.
      Personnaly I encourage them as they use this potential to do good and gainful things. it's good for them if they could make money online, and it's even better if they share the knowledge they have.
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    • Profile picture of the author Daniel Brock
      Originally Posted by CDarklock View Post

      They lack vision. They simply don't have the ability to think years down the road.

      What they have is a fresh perspective. They can cut through a lot of garbage very quickly and see to the heart of a problem.

      As a teen myself, I did a lot of cool stuff. Same in my early 20s. But everything I ever did was flash-in-the-pan. I always thought "wow, this stuff is easy" and mouthed off about how easy it was - and then it all fell apart and I didn't know why.

      Now, newly into my 40s, I watch teens do the exact same crap I did and mouth off the exact same way I did and I know it's going to fall apart the exact same way it did for me... and then they disappear. And I know why, too.

      But I pay very close attention to them, because in certain ways, they're brilliant. They think more clearly than any of us. They can often see the flaw, the shining crack in the surface of the system that none of us old farts can see, and they can usually pry it open and pull a bunch of money out.

      If you listen, you can figure out how to do it, too.

      And if they'd listen, they'd learn how to keep it from falling apart on them.
      I do agree with that 100%.

      I also know the thoughts that go through your head when you are young and successful.

      You are right thought - at such a young age you can't possibly think ahead more than a few years.

      More like 'yeah, I'm young i got lots of money so I'm set...'

      I wonder how many young kids can get rich and hang on to the money, or still have the desire to push themselves further after 'making it' at a young age.

      I bet there are very few...
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      • Profile picture of the author CDarklock
        Originally Posted by Daniel Brock View Post

        I wonder how many young kids can get rich and hang on to the money, or still have the desire to push themselves further after 'making it' at a young age.
        I sure as hell couldn't.

        There have been three separate periods in my life... late twenties, early thirties, and mid thirties... when it was normal for me to have a six-figure bank balance. None of them lasted.

        And none of those are all that young.

        I do envy the younger folks, who are having those issues in their teens. I have this sense that they'll have it figured out in their late twenties and early thirties, when they can really do something with it and enjoy it. I'd love to have had the kind of success a lot of the younger entrepreneurs do.

        Of course, I still fundamentally act like I'm fifteen. Maybe that counts.
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        "The Golden Town is the Golden Town no longer. They have sold their pillars for brass and their temples for money, they have made coins out of their golden doors. It is become a dark town full of trouble, there is no ease in its streets, beauty has left it and the old songs are gone." - Lord Dunsany, The Messengers
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        • Profile picture of the author bretski
          There was a kid that I knew in high school... very geeky but didn't do well in school. People used to make fun of him because he had a little lawn maintenance business. He built a cart that hooked onto the back of his bike and he would ride all over town cutting lawns. We were about 14-15 years old so nobody had drivers licenses and even if you did your parents didn't buy you a car.

          Flash forward 5 years or so. We're all out of school and I see this dude at the gas station. I didn't know it was him but realized it was him as I was drooling all over his Pantera and a friend clued me in to who it was!

          So, I agree with Tina... there have always been kids who had an entrepreneurial spirit...

          CD?....yeah...it comes and it goes. But I think that if you look back at many successful entrepreneurs you will see that they went bankrupt at times over their lives either due to their own recklessness or poor lifestyle choices.

          You will also find this with many folks who win the lottery. The difference between them and you, my friend, is that you know how to make it back! Hitting the lottery isn't a skill that is easily mastered. You're going to be alright big guy!
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        • Profile picture of the author mrdomains
          I also think it´s great with the young crowd. Can´t always be easy though since many probably see broad experience, track-record and reputation to be the basis of trust, the seed of mature ideas and the foundation of success.. and, how much experience can a 18 year old have anyway?. when the rest of us are 50?.. and have been online since the day you were born!?

          Seriously though, I think that part of the uphill battle for the young crowd may be not jealousy, but perhaps embarrassment, or some feel ashamed that after all these years they are bettered by some snotty kid from nowhere.

          I think it is refreshing. And good for the biz.
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        • Profile picture of the author psresearch
          Originally Posted by CDarklock View Post

          Of course, I still fundamentally act like I'm fifteen. Maybe that counts.
          I think keeping in touch with that energy is "vital" so to speak. I see a lot of my friends trying to subvert it I believe some of their "blocks" are because of it. Of course then there's the other extreme of not managing that energy well.

          I like to think of the best teen marketers as both "young marketers" and "teen marketers" - they have the raw energy of the teenage years, but the "young marketer" implies that they have started to learn to manage that energy in a responsible and disciplined way.
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    • Profile picture of the author eleary
      Originally Posted by CDarklock View Post

      They lack vision. They simply don't have the ability to think years down the road.

      What they have is a fresh perspective. They can cut through a lot of garbage very quickly and see to the heart of a problem.

      As a teen myself, I did a lot of cool stuff. Same in my early 20s. But everything I ever did was flash-in-the-pan. I always thought "wow, this stuff is easy" and mouthed off about how easy it was - and then it all fell apart and I didn't know why.

      Now, newly into my 40s, I watch teens do the exact same crap I did and mouth off the exact same way I did and I know it's going to fall apart the exact same way it did for me... and then they disappear. And I know why, too.

      But I pay very close attention to them, because in certain ways, they're brilliant. They think more clearly than any of us. They can often see the flaw, the shining crack in the surface of the system that none of us old farts can see, and they can usually pry it open and pull a bunch of money out.

      If you listen, you can figure out how to do it, too.

      And if they'd listen, they'd learn how to keep it from falling apart on them.

      I think you aren't giving them enough credit! I taught an entrepreneur class to high school kids. You would be completely amazed at the ideas they came up with and the follow through they had.

      Think of the freedom we are after - they already have it - no worries if it doesn't really work. In a way, it may make them better at the game!

      Also, they have gown up with a mouse in their hand. They know computers far better than most of the "experieinced" marketers. It's defnitely to their advantage. Even just a powerpoint - they can create powerpoints at that age that would blow away most I have seen.

      I just read a book called Lessons of a Lipstick Queen - she began her lipstick empire at about 18. She just went for it. As adults, we have a lot more fear of failure.

      Anyway, I think it's awesome! I wish I had started when I was 16. Imagine!
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    • Profile picture of the author invitetheweb
      Originally Posted by CDarklock View Post

      They lack vision. They simply don't have the ability to think years down the road.

      What they have is a fresh perspective. They can cut through a lot of garbage very quickly and see to the heart of a problem.

      As a teen myself, I did a lot of cool stuff. Same in my early 20s. But everything I ever did was flash-in-the-pan. I always thought "wow, this stuff is easy" and mouthed off about how easy it was - and then it all fell apart and I didn't know why.

      Now, newly into my 40s, I watch teens do the exact same crap I did and mouth off the exact same way I did and I know it's going to fall apart the exact same way it did for me... and then they disappear. And I know why, too.

      But I pay very close attention to them, because in certain ways, they're brilliant. They think more clearly than any of us. They can often see the flaw, the shining crack in the surface of the system that none of us old farts can see, and they can usually pry it open and pull a bunch of money out.

      If you listen, you can figure out how to do it, too.

      And if they'd listen, they'd learn how to keep it from falling apart on them.
      Couldn't have said it any better myself. Good response!
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  • Profile picture of the author cashcow
    When I was that age I was too busy partying so I think it's quite amazing that anyone in their teens would even want to have a business online!

    But, I do think that one reason they can do well is because they aren't all filled up with all those limiting beliefs that you get as you get older. It seems like a lot of the ones I have noticed really take the bulls by the horn and go for it.

    Some of the teens I have "talked" to in forums or online are a lot more mature and professional than some of the 40 year olds I talk to in real life. In fact there have been quite a few cases where I have really respected someone and thought they had many years of business experience under their belts only to find out they were teenagers! (It didn't make me respect them any less I was just surprised at how much they knew with so few years in!)

    Lee
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  • Profile picture of the author CurtisN
    On one hand, I'm envious of the ones who started even earlier than I did (18).

    On the other hand, I think it's important to remember that these years (13-18) are extremely important years of your life...not that the other ones aren't important LOL.

    Don't forget to leave the house and have some fun, y'know? Hang out, goof off, enjoy life.

    It's good to make piles of money before you leave your teen years, but it isn't worth it if it means sacrificing friends, family, maturing, and fun.

    But yeah, I think it's awesome that there are quite a few teen marketers doing very well online. I wish there were more

    Curtis
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    • Profile picture of the author Tina Golden
      I think it's awesome. It's not any different online than off - there are always those who are entrepreneurial spirits from a young age. In my youth, those were the kids out there, not just babysitting or mowing lawns, but organizing TEAMS to work for them. Or setting themselves up as the neighborhood dog watcher or house sitter.

      My son is like that but I can't get him into the online thing. Offline, he's constantly trying to get things started like the bike repair service that he tried to get going from our backyard a couple years ago. I believe that someday he may get into the online thing but he prefers to do things where he can work with his hands right now. But I know that if he continues with this spirit, he will succeed at something.

      Tina
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    • Funny thing is, when I was 15, I made slightly over £1,000 selling ebooks on ebay. I then got into gaming (mistake) and I have no idea why, but I lost interest in it. When I decided to get back into it, ebay changed their rules and you could no longer sell a digital product, it had to be physical.

      I tried a few others ways and I eventually just gave up. Went to college for 2 years, passed but I hated what I was doing. Was supposed to be going to Uni last september, but then I dropped out at the last minute.

      Got a full time job, and then discovered IM end of April of this year. Soon realised that I could turn this into a full time living if I put my mind to it. Was hard not making any money for 2 months, but when I made my first sale, I knew I was never going to give up.

      I'll be full time this time next year.
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  • Profile picture of the author Bondtana
    I find it curious that all of the sudden all these young successful internet marketers were getting to the forefront (sort of like all the pretty girls that have been popping up on WF). I always assumed they had some old sage IM'er behind the scenes putting them up to it.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mohammad Afaq
    I am a teen myself so I would love to see how people think about me and my IM "ventures"
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    • Profile picture of the author bigbrian
      I think it's great teenagers are becoming entrepreneurs so early in life. It will allow them to excel when they get to their later teenage / early 20s.

      When I was 13 I used to run a single line BBS using VirtualBBS. Besides that I used to roam the internet when nobody really knew it was "the internet". Couriering WaReZ over dialup was the hot thing back then amongst my circle of friends - and can you believe doing that over dialup? LOL!

      I never made any money in my teen years online although I was a hardcore computer junkie. If I knew know what I knew then I think things would be a lot different because I would have caught the edge of internet marketing a little sooner in life. Although I have to agree with what someone else said... Make sure you get out of the house and enjoy life!

      Brian
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  • Profile picture of the author ShaneRQR
    I think it's great when teens build (or try to build) their own businesses.

    I don't think I'm envious of them, but I do sometimes wish it hadn't taken me such a damn long time to get here.
    I guess I'm just a slow learner and need to make 99 mistakes for every step along the way.

    If someone can make that progress at a young age and avoid all of these pitfalls, more power to them!
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  • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
    As a customer, I couldn't care much less how old they are, unless the topic requires experience they're unlikely to have. As a moderator, the same, except that they have to be 13 or older because of COPPA rules. As a person, I think they're great examples for anyone who says it can't be done.


    Paul
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  • Profile picture of the author globalpro
    I don't think it's so much an issue of them making big bucks, as what they do with it once they do. I would hope that they have someone close to them to bring perspective to the massive income they make (not their peer group), where they can begin to benefit from it long term. In other words, not let it be all about 'what can I spend my money on?', but 'how can I set myself up for the long term?'

    And yes, I applaud them for their effort and success, but a lot of people won't.

    Thanks,

    John
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  • Profile picture of the author Caleb Spilchen
    As a 15 Year Old Marketer I don't have a problem with Teen Marketers, and I believe that, they can make a ton of money online.

    I'm certainly not making millions, but its not a couple of bucks..

    I don't think age should be important (other then coppa) In the quality of a product, or work.
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    • Profile picture of the author CDarklock
      Originally Posted by Caleb Spilchen View Post

      As a 15 Year Old Marketer I don't have a problem with Teen Marketers, and I believe that, they can make a ton of money online.
      Your definition of "a ton" will change dramatically when you are responsible for a household budget. And even more dramatically when you have a family to support.
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      • Profile picture of the author Caleb Spilchen
        Originally Posted by CDarklock View Post

        Your definition of "a ton" will change dramatically when you are responsible for a household budget. And even more dramatically when you have a family to support.
        By "a ton" I meant 100,000, as I know there are teen marketers who are making that.
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        • Profile picture of the author Lett
          I am 15 year old and mike pretty nice income - more than my parents do both. I am not millionaire (yet), but if i can, there must be people who can do it better
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        • Profile picture of the author bretski
          Originally Posted by Caleb Spilchen View Post

          By "a ton" I meant 100,000, as I know there are teen marketers who are making that.
          IRS takes 25%...child support takes 30% of the gross...maybe a little alimony...25% debt to income ratio and you do have some money to play with
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          • Profile picture of the author Caleb Spilchen
            Originally Posted by bretski View Post

            IRS takes 25%...child support takes 30% of the gross...maybe a little alimony...25% debt to income ratio and you do have some money to play with
            Lucky I don't have to pay the IRS then in Canada :p.. Actually it's funny, that taxes are higher in America then in Canada, but we get free health care.
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            • Profile picture of the author bretski
              Originally Posted by Caleb Spilchen View Post

              Lucky I don't have to pay the IRS then in Canada :p.. Actually it's funny, that taxes are higher in America then in Canada, but we get free health care.
              Yeah agreed...we have a nasty habit of policing the world. Can't remember the last time I hear a foreign nation pleading to Canada to help them after they've been invaded by some dictator! lol!
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            • Profile picture of the author bgmacaw
              Originally Posted by Caleb Spilchen View Post

              Actually it's funny, that taxes are higher in America then in Canada, but we get free health care.
              Oh, you pay for it, just not directly. There ain't no free lunch but they haven't figured that out in Washington yet.

              But, to get to the actual question. I'd love for my 13 year old to do something online that would make money rather than costing me money. Those 'free' MMORPG's aren't so free sometimes. I wish I had invented one.

              When I was a teen back in the dark ages (aka the 70's) I mowed lawns and did various other types of outdoor work, including tarring roofs and digging sewer/septic lines. But we were happy in those days...

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        • Profile picture of the author CDarklock
          Originally Posted by Caleb Spilchen View Post

          By "a ton" I meant 100,000, as I know there are teen marketers who are making that.
          As someone who earned significantly more than that while supporting a family, I can assure you this is not a ton.
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        • Profile picture of the author Thomas Smale
          Originally Posted by Caleb Spilchen View Post

          By "a ton" I meant 100,000, as I know there are teen marketers who are making that.
          100k really won't go as far as you think.

          In the UK that would pay for a reasonable mortgage, 2 kids and a comfortable lifestyle - nothing more.

          Other thing to remember is that it's unlikely many of them will maintain that level of earnings, hence why it is so important to invest wisely so they are set if that level falls.

          On the other hand, if that same teenager put 75% of that into wise investments, by the time they are 60 they would be able to retire very comfortably
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          • Profile picture of the author williamrs
            Originally Posted by Thomas Smale View Post

            100k really won't go as far as you think.

            In the UK that would pay for a reasonable mortgage, 2 kids and a comfortable lifestyle - nothing more.

            Other thing to remember is that it's unlikely many of them will maintain that level of earnings, hence why it is so important to invest wisely so they are set if that level falls.

            On the other hand, if that same teenager put 75% of that into wise investments, by the time they are 60 they would be able to retire very comfortably
            Maybe yes. Maybe not.

            For me (and for most internet marketer, I'm sure), the first dollar was the hardest one. It took me 2 years to make my first penny and 2 months after that to make a full-time income. Since that day, my income has grown every single month, without exceptions.

            Based on this fact, somebody who makes 100K online can make much more with their solid model and experience. It's all about reinvesting wisely.


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            • Profile picture of the author Thomas Smale
              Originally Posted by williamrs View Post

              For me (and for most internet marketer, I'm sure), the first dollar was the hardest one. It took me 2 years to make my first penny and 2 months after that to make a full-time income. Since that day, my income has grown every single month, without exceptions.
              I was more referring to longer term (20 years +)

              I make a comfortable 6 figures but I couldn't tell you where my income will be when I'm 40 (18 years) so I'm very careful to invest it wisely (stocks, gold, bonds etc). My income has already gone up as well, but I wouldn't bet on it doing that forever.
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  • Profile picture of the author Sylvia Meier
    I think it is wonderful. I don't know if it's because I was on the younger side when I came online in search of making money (I was 19 at that time) or if it is the fact I love seeing others success. And when it is younger individuals having that success I find it even better.

    I know my daughter who turns 12 on Tuesday has an interest in IM and I think in a lot of ways she has more money sense than I ever did at that age. Perhaps it is because I have instilled those values from a young age, or because I was never really taught those skills that young. It wasn't till I was a single mom at 17 that I ever really had to worry or care about money. My daughter on the other hand, wants to venture into IM so that come the time she turns 18 and is ready to go to college or get started on her own, she will already have the bank account balance to do it instead of struggling to handle it then.

    Long story short, I applaud those who do it, and understand those that don't. After all, you're only young once, so it should be spent enjoying it. (And if you enjoy doing IM, then you get the best of both worlds.)

    Sylvia
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  • Profile picture of the author williamrs
    I'm almost 19 now (6 days remaining!), but I got started with IM when I was 15. It took me 2 years to make money online, but I had 2 problems:

    1 - My english was terrible (even now it's not very good ) and I had no money to hire freelance writers.

    2 - I lost a lot of time with MLMs and other schemes and didn't focus on a real business for more than a year.

    If I had started putting my efforts on a good business model and were a native english speaker I think I could have made money in 1 year. Maybe less. For this reason, I believe that there are many guys out there making a lot of money online at 16 or 17. Maybe even less, since some people get started at 13 - 14.

    The reason why many people are skeptical is because they are 30+ yrs old and still couldn't make their first buck after yrs struggling or had to overcome many barriers to build an online business and consider their experience the most important factor that has contributed to their success.

    However, I think that creativity and persistence is the key to make money in this business. Teens use to be very creative and they can be more persistent than adults, because they don't need to support a family, so if they fail they ask more money to their parents and try again.


    William
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    • Profile picture of the author CDarklock
      Originally Posted by williamrs View Post

      The reason why many people are skeptical is because they are 30+ yrs old and still couldn't make their first buck after yrs struggling or had to overcome many barriers to build an online business and consider their experience the most important factor that has contributed to their success.
      The reality is that half of your experience will make you successful, and the other half is the barrier. You have to think differently. Teens have that part down solid - they think differently just by nature.

      The single biggest obstacle most older people have to overcome is their misconceptions about how the market works, how people think, and how money is made... because you have to believe certain things about those to work at a "day job" and not go insane.

      Teens don't labour under that yoke, so they don't have to throw it off. It's years of indoctrination into the employee mentality that stop most people from having success, and teens simply don't have that problem.
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      "The Golden Town is the Golden Town no longer. They have sold their pillars for brass and their temples for money, they have made coins out of their golden doors. It is become a dark town full of trouble, there is no ease in its streets, beauty has left it and the old songs are gone." - Lord Dunsany, The Messengers
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  • Profile picture of the author Caleb Spilchen
    I'd love for my 13 year old to do something online that would make money rather than costing me money. Those 'free' MMORPG's aren't so free sometimes. I wish I had invented one.
    Yes, for some reason, my little brother made me use my prepaid cc (for those buggy products, that only take cc), to pay for his runescape...
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    Caleb Spilchen

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  • Profile picture of the author Sylvia Meier
    I'm sure that 15 year old marketers don't care about the mortgage and kids as of yet.

    I think 100K/year for a 15 year old would be a ton of money. I mean what do they have to spend that kinda cash one exactly. Like with my daughter, her goal is to have the $100k or so it will take to fund her eduction, not to buy a house and raise 2 kids with.

    I mean at 17 when I was a single mother I would have killed for that income per year. I know people who have worked their entire lives and still don't make that in a year, so I think it would be a great goal for a teen marketer.

    Just my thoughts.

    Sylvia
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  • Profile picture of the author Caleb Spilchen
    100k isn't my goal this year, but I'm not sure about next
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  • Profile picture of the author Biggy Fat
    The youth rules.
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  • Profile picture of the author Brad Spencer
    I'd like to chime in here...

    For me, I think it's impressive. I am 24 and no where near making the money I want...granted I have big goals but c'est la vie.

    The only thing I say about teenagers is if they have their head right...they can build a big biz by my age. The key is realizing experience is important and required.

    However, here's the twist (this gets me a lot of contacts people take years to get)...

    Let's say you're a 16 year old kid in America. You have access to broadband internet, are probably decently tech savvy, and grew up in a very blessed time.

    There's absolutely no way for you to have the same experience level as someone in their 40s. Mathematically impossible. You just haven't lived as long. However, you can still get this "experience" albeit in a different way.

    You find yourself some mentors. Talk big, act big, and follow up. This really impresses people who are older than you. They will share things. Listen, challenge, and then take into account their advice in your actions. You'll have a lot less pain in the long run and you will get "experience" for free...without the pain.

    I remember reading a self improvement book that gave me this idea. It said that you'll make enough mistakes yourself...no reason to make ones other people have already made.

    Always remember that...that's what I would say about a teen marketer. Make sure you have that in mind.

    Sustainability is SOOOOOOO underrated in our age group (teens and 20's)

    But simplistically...making money online for a teen at all is pretty damn impressive. And to any teen reading this post...congrats if you're making money and congrats if you're trying...either way you're light years ahead of your peers (and probably your parents)

    Cheers,

    Brad
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  • Profile picture of the author Caleb Spilchen
    Even better if they made it big all by themselves - without their dad/mum teaching them all they know!
    ...I tried to do the opposite and teach them.. Needless to say, it went over their heads.
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    • Profile picture of the author slowrider
      Originally Posted by Caleb Spilchen View Post

      ...I tried to do the opposite and teach them.. Needless to say, it went over their heads.

      I think the teens who are making any money at IM are fantastic. I've seen and worked with so many teens who are lost in gangs, drugs, etc., etc. If they are working in their home trying to make money - it's keeping them off the streets. Instead of finding ways to steal what they want, they can buy it themselves. Plus they are learning the value of a dollar because I can bet you none of them have stumbled upon the almighty get rich quick scheme we all wish was out there.

      I do envy them one thing - they are much more tech savvy than myself. Computers and software programs come much easier to them.

      The only thing I hope they are doing (or their parents are making them do) is putting at least 1/3 of the money they make away for later in life because there will always come a rainy day some time in the future.

      Otherwise, more power to them!
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  • Profile picture of the author nettech
    The internet has opened up wonderful opportunties for today's youth. I think its absolutely wonderful that they are doing this ad its great that this is now becoming the 'norm'.

    Its not just about money, but it allows kids to gain skills such a discipline, how to manage money, writing, project management, business acumen etc all which are transferable later on in life. On the flip side, it probably discourages them going out with their friends but to be honest, most young people where I live will most likely cause trouble and mischief anyway so its probably a good thing. I would much rather that these kids are investing in themselves for the future by staying at home and earning a full or part time wage as opposed to trying to figure out who they will be robbing that night (sorry for the generalisation).

    I think its excellent and in fact I'm introducing my 17 year old nephew to this whole IM thing since its the holidays here in the UK now!

    All they need is someone to keep their heads firmly on the ground otherwise they might not know what to do with all that money...lol

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  • Profile picture of the author fushigi
    I am totally inspired and impressed by teen marketers! I love learning from them and I feel motivated by their enthusiasm! Especially when so many "older" folks become jaded and negative, I thrive on the positive attitude and possibility thinking of many of the teen marketers I've had the chance to interact with!
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      I have mixed feelings on the subject...

      On one hand, I applaud their energy and work ethic. I'm happy to read the stories of youngsters that make good money by providing value, especially when they can keep their heads on straight.

      On the other hand, I feel a little sorry for them because for many they are missing the one time in their life when they can explore without the weight of responsibility.

      In truth, I'm a little sad when I see the odd story about the lightning strike success (like the girl with the background pages). I know there are a ton of young people out there who will see that and assume they can have the same kind of success.

      Just like in sports, for every LeBron, Kobe, or Kevin Garnett that comes out of high school to make millions in the NBA, there are hundreds who aren't good enough and will never get the chance to really learn the game because they slacked off at school because they were certain they going to the NBA...
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  • Profile picture of the author Caleb Spilchen
    @JohnMcCabe - You know this thread, is the first I heard of the girl with the MySpace Layouts, and that's an interesting story. I usually see those stories of 'teens' earning xxx,xx and then I look at it as "1 one 100", because I know that it won't be easy, if I were to get there.
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    • Profile picture of the author The Copy Nazi
      Banned
      Originally Posted by Caleb Spilchen View Post

      @JohnMcCabe - You know this thread, is the first I heard of the girl with the MySpace Layouts, and that's an interesting story. I usually see those stories of 'teens' earning xxx,xx and then I look at it as "1 one 100", because I know that it won't be easy, if I were to get there.
      Ashley Qualls of Detroit, Michigan started a website three years ago when she was fourteen. Now she's seventeen and that little website has already made her One Million Dollars and gets more searches on Google than Oprah - it was ranked 349 in mid-July out of more than 20 million sites. Oprah was off-the-pace at just 469. Isn't that amazing?
      So what's with the website? you're asking. Simple. Ashley offers free Myspace layouts and graphics. Targeted to girls like her. And the Ads on the site bring in $70,000 a month. How much did the Start-Up cost? Ashley admits she had to borrow the original $8 from her Mum to register the domain.
      More about Ashley here on my blog - MySpace Layouts - Nikki Catsouras Photos | Unique baby names | make girl dance baby | Frank Kern List Machine ?
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  • Profile picture of the author Robert Domino
    I wish they focused on school.

    I don't care if you're a teen millionaire. I don't find it successful.

    I would prefer if you were an educated teen.
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    • Profile picture of the author Thomas Smale
      Originally Posted by Robert Domino View Post

      I wish they focused on school.

      I don't care if you're a teen millionaire. I don't find it successful.

      I would prefer if you were an educated teen.
      So you're saying that the "education" someone would naturally get by making a million doesn't surpass what they teach you in school?

      And who's to say you can't make a million AND do well at school?

      Your mindset is similar to "poor dad" in Rich Dad, Poor Dad - you should read it, it's a good book.
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      • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
        Originally Posted by Thomas Smale View Post

        So you're saying that the "education" someone would naturally get by making a million doesn't surpass what they teach you in school?

        And who's to say you can't make a million AND do well at school?

        Your mindset is similar to "poor dad" in Rich Dad, Poor Dad - you should read it, it's a good book.
        If the only thing you know how to do is make money, you are missing a very large part of the world.

        I'd like to see universities go back to the mission of educating people, rahter than acting as some kind of job-training center.
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        • Profile picture of the author Robert Domino
          Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

          I'd like to see universities go back to the mission of educating people, rahter than acting as some kind of job-training center.
          Amen.

          I just completed a master's degree in political philosophy. Do I need it for my online business? No.

          Does the wealth of knowledge learned, helping me understand life and the world, make me a better person? It sure feels like it.
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        • Profile picture of the author Thomas Smale
          Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

          If the only thing you know how to do is make money, you are missing a very large part of the world.

          I'd like to see universities go back to the mission of educating people, rahter than acting as some kind of job-training center.
          Of course, no denying that. There's a lot more to making money than just knowing what to do, it involves the use of a number of life skills (communcation, writing, selling, managing etc).

          We are talking about school here, not higher education where most would no longer be in their teens.
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          • Profile picture of the author Robert Domino
            Originally Posted by Thomas Smale View Post

            Of course, no denying that. There's a lot more to making money than just knowing what to do, it involves the use of a number of life skills (communcation, writing, selling, managing etc).

            We are talking about school here, not higher education where most would no longer be in their teens.
            There's a difference between teens making some money on the side on internet, and a "teen marketer" working at it obsessively.

            I've read some posts on here from teens who spend their whole days working on it, usually making peanuts. Like that guy who made a 20$ sale after working non-stop for 2 weeks.

            Granted, it's the summer right now so it's not as much of a big deal. It is a big deal if they do that the whole year.
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            • Profile picture of the author Thomas Smale
              Originally Posted by Robert Domino View Post

              There's a difference between teens making some money on the side on internet, and a "teen marketer" working at it obsessively.

              I've read some posts on here from teens who spend their whole days working on it, usually making peanuts. Like that guy who made a 20$ sale after working non-stop for 2 weeks.

              Granted, it's the summer right now so it's not as much of a big deal. It is a big deal if they do that the whole year.
              Oh yes, definitely. The initial question was only referring to those who are successful though, in which case there is a valid argument for lack of further education (college and above).

              I've got no problem with it IF they are successful, but for the 99.9999% of people who don't make a million before they are 20, they have lost out on a lot of life that they will never get back.

              I wasn't entrepreneurial until a few years ago, and spent all of my younger years messing around with friends and playing sports. Do I regret it? No, not at all.
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      • Profile picture of the author helicopterplt
        I think it is amazing that some of these kids "Figure it out" at such a young age... I can't help but notice the jealous feeling creeping up inside me as I realize the value in what they have discovered at such a young age....Perhaps its not even jealousy but a feeling of anger towards myself for not applying myself when I was young...but I was to worried about what I was going to do for the weekend ...wished now I would have started younger....

        Congrats to all the 'young-ns' that are able to apply themselves and learn such a valuable skill...I applaud them.
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      • Profile picture of the author Chris Ng
        Originally Posted by Thomas Smale View Post

        So you're saying that the "education" someone would naturally get by making a million doesn't surpass what they teach you in school?

        And who's to say you can't make a million AND do well at school?

        Your mindset is similar to "poor dad" in Rich Dad, Poor Dad - you should read it, it's a good book.
        Agree with that, the final goal is learn how to get out from rat race to fast track.as long as you just follow all old rule from school, you will never get it.

        Chris
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      • Profile picture of the author AndrewCavanagh
        I don't care what age you are.

        I just look at the quality of what you're producing and the quality and integrity behind your actions.

        Kindest regards,
        Andrew Cavanagh
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      • Profile picture of the author thriftgirl62
        What is a "ton" of money? I'd say based on that real life chart, $100,000 still qualifies as the answer. Based on the lifestyles and business income of others, $100,000 still qualifies but instead of annual income, they could be earning a ton of money per month, week, daily or by the hour.


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      • Profile picture of the author funkynassau
        I'm envious of the teens making a buck online. I wish I had been able to do that when I was in that age group. How can we be negative towards a young entrepreneur?
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      • Profile picture of the author connorbringas
        Making Millions online? I dont really believe that..
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      • Profile picture of the author olix1
        I totally agree that some teens should be doing Internet marketing. Im a teen myself and have been trying to get going for the past two months. A lot of my peers think that I am crazy, but i feel that it is a great way to make money, especially because of my age. I mean since I am in high school and i don't have and bills to pay or support a family i could mess up and it wouldn't be detrimental to my life. The cool thing about it is that its kind of fun. So yes I agree that there should be teens in internet marketing.
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      • Profile picture of the author steveshills
        I dont think it matters how old a person is, as long as the system they have works then good luck to them, if there running a service business then experience is the key to keeping customers happy, but we all make mistakes and have to learn from them, good luck to the 13 to 16 year olds that are making a good living from the online world.
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        • Profile picture of the author Luis Medilo
          Age doesn't matter. In fact, it's a huge motivation for me if I see Internet marketers half my age making more money than I do.
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    • Originally Posted by Robert Domino View Post

      I wish they focused on school.

      I don't care if you're a teen millionaire. I don't find it successful.

      I would prefer if you were an educated teen.
      Sounds a little sheepish to me.

      Teen millionaire > book smart
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      • Profile picture of the author Scott Kennedy
        Originally Posted by GoodnightSweetRatRace View Post

        Sounds a little sheepish to me.

        Teen millionaire > book smart
        I agree with the other poster. I would prefer the teens to get an education. Sure, being a teen millionaire is great. But when they eventually piss it all away and can't go to college because they lacked the skills during high school, they will be pretty much screwed when it comes to 'normal' jobs.

        I made 40k online in one year as a teen. I pissed it away and have nothing to show for it. Lucky for me I did well at school and am currently on a university academic scholarship so I know that if I ever waste any more money online, I can fall back on a good paying 9-5.

        Formal education > making money online IMO.
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        • Profile picture of the author TheAnnoyingOrange
          Originally Posted by Scott Kennedy View Post

          I agree with the other poster. I would prefer the teens to get an education. Sure, being a teen millionaire is great. But when they eventually piss it all away and can't go to college because they lacked the skills during high school, they will be pretty much screwed when it comes to 'normal' jobs.

          I made 40k online in one year as a teen. I pissed it away and have nothing to show for it. Lucky for me I did well at school and am currently on a university academic scholarship so I know that if I ever waste any more money online, I can fall back on a good paying 9-5.

          Formal education > making money online IMO.
          Just because you "pissed it away" does not mean that others will. Some teens might be smart enough to invest that money and focus on the long-term rather than short-term monetary gains.
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          • Profile picture of the author Scott Kennedy
            Originally Posted by TheAnnoyingOrange View Post

            Just because you "pissed it away" does not mean that others will. Some teens might be smart enough to invest that money and focus on the long-term rather than short-term monetary gains.
            I totally agree. However, how many 14-17 year olds do you know that would invest it? Online income is not a sure thing. You may have a great year, then the very next not sell a thing. Having an education is the absolute best back up plan anyone can ever have. Full stop.
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            • Profile picture of the author TheAnnoyingOrange
              Originally Posted by Scott Kennedy View Post

              I totally agree. However, how many 14-17 year olds do you know that would invest it? Online income is not a sure thing. You may have a great year, then the very next not sell a thing. Having an education is the absolute best back up plan anyone can ever have. Full stop.
              I can safely say that I am one of those teens I completely agree with you that having an education is the best backup plan and that is what I intend to continue with and go straight to university after I finish year 12 (in less than 3 months)
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    • Profile picture of the author Caleb Spilchen
      Originally Posted by Robert Domino View Post

      I wish they focused on school.

      I don't care if you're a teen millionaire. I don't find it successful.

      I would prefer if you were an educated teen.
      Just because we work online, does not mean we do not focus on school. In fact, we have much more of a focus, because we want to learn more about topics that we can use for marketing.

      For example, my interest in English class sparked, back in the days of my article writing. I am still extremely interested in History.

      My marks are increasing from starting marketing. So No, I don't think you should make those statements.

      Basically in my mind, and correct me please, you said "teens who work online, suck at school". Right? Sorry if I mis-understood.

      Caleb
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      • Profile picture of the author CDarklock
        Originally Posted by Caleb Spilchen View Post

        Just because we work online, does not mean we do not focus on school.
        Most older people don't understand just how LITTLE focus school takes. They pretty much teach the same crap over and over for six years.
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        • Profile picture of the author Caleb Spilchen
          Originally Posted by CDarklock View Post

          Most older people don't understand just how LITTLE focus school takes. They pretty much teach the same crap over and over for six years.
          Finally, someone understands.
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          • Profile picture of the author Thomas Smale
            Originally Posted by Caleb Spilchen View Post

            Finally, someone understands.
            I remember when I was 15, I had exactly the same mindset. Top of my class, couldn't put a foot wrong etc and barely took anytime or focus at all.

            That changes when you go into higher education and it starts taking up much more of your life.

            I'm not a big fan of the education system, but I do believe it is important to get a good "formal" education to go with your own business.
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          • Profile picture of the author CDarklock
            Originally Posted by Caleb Spilchen View Post

            Finally, someone understands.
            I spent most of my childhood recognising just how much adults DIDN'T understand and swearing I'd never forget.

            Children - and teens - understand so much more than you think. Half of what you think they don't get, they get, and they get that you don't think they'll get it. They understand just how little you think of them. How you dismiss them.

            Perspective is hard. It's hard because you need to have seen twenty years to understand what five years is like. There's no way around that.

            But that doesn't make them stupid. And that doesn't mean they don't see.
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            "The Golden Town is the Golden Town no longer. They have sold their pillars for brass and their temples for money, they have made coins out of their golden doors. It is become a dark town full of trouble, there is no ease in its streets, beauty has left it and the old songs are gone." - Lord Dunsany, The Messengers
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        • Profile picture of the author Mohammad Afaq
          Originally Posted by CDarklock View Post

          Most older people don't understand just how LITTLE focus school takes. They pretty much teach the same crap over and over for six years.
          I kinda don't agree because that's not how it went for me. It is true that I took all honor classes but still it's not a whole lot different.

          I always found something new in every single one of my classes. There was always something that I learned that I hadn't known before.

          But like I said before, I was the nerd who took all honor and Advanced placement classes (college credit) so you might just consider me an exception
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      • Profile picture of the author Robert Domino
        Originally Posted by Caleb Spilchen View Post

        Basically in my mind, and correct me please, you said "teens who work online, suck at school". Right? Sorry if I mis-understood.
        Caleb
        It's a well documented fact that students who work more than 14 hours per week are much, much more likely to drop out from school.

        They even WARN YOU about it when you enter college.

        You can argue with me as long as you want, since my claim is based on statistics and not just opinion.

        As for teen millionaire > book smart. No.

        Again, all studies link education with a healthier lifestyle, more involved social life (ie something as simple as voting) etc.
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    • Profile picture of the author kcorps
      Originally Posted by Robert Domino View Post

      I wish they focused on school.

      I don't care if you're a teen millionaire. I don't find it successful.

      I would prefer if you were an educated teen.
      Yes, I always admire those who gain success in a very young age. Sometimes, my admiration leads to jealousy . Just like many people in this room I regret why i did not start this type of business earlier..

      To me, education is absolutely important, however, I believe there are two kinds of education; formal and informal. They both are equally important. The formal education is the one people get from formal school while the informal is the one people get from live experience. So, in my opinion, young crowd should balance their obligation in these two educations. Stay happy, make good money, and go to school
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    • Profile picture of the author Jacqueline Smith
      Originally Posted by Robert Domino View Post

      I wish they focused on school.

      I don't care if you're a teen millionaire. I don't find it successful.

      I would prefer if you were an educated teen.
      School is only one way to get educated. Actually, in my opinion, probably the least amount of education that you'll actually use in the real world. I think it's great that teen IMers are learning and working instead of just hanging out. Nobody is making them do it, they are doing it because it interests them.

      I wish I had tapped into my entrepenurial spirit when I was a teen! Fortunately, I eventually did and now encourage my children to do the same in whatever interests them.
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    • Profile picture of the author Hesaidblissfully
      Originally Posted by Robert Domino View Post

      I wish they focused on school.

      I don't care if you're a teen millionaire. I don't find it successful.

      I would prefer if you were an educated teen.
      What about being a millionaire would preclude them from being educated?

      If anything, the skills you have to learn to run a successful business are much more valuable to an adult than most of the stuff kids are taught in high school today.

      How many adults do you know whose lives wouldn't be vastly improved if they were better at sales, marketing, organization, managing their time, leadership, management, etc?

      Versus how many adults do you know whose lives would be vastly improved if they were better at calculus and trigonometry?

      In any case, as far a teenpreneurs, I say more power to them.
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    • Profile picture of the author williamrs
      Originally Posted by Robert Domino View Post

      I wish they focused on school.

      I don't care if you're a teen millionaire. I don't find it successful.

      I would prefer if you were an educated teen.
      School will give you knowledge, which you can acquire by many other ways. However, most teens go to school and then to college because they want to learn something to make a living. Pick 10 students and offer them 2 million dollars if they leave the school/college. How many do you think that would accept your offer?


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    • Profile picture of the author Mohammad Afaq
      Originally Posted by Robert Domino View Post

      I wish they focused on school.

      I don't care if you're a teen millionaire. I don't find it successful.

      I would prefer if you were an educated teen.
      I am a full time internet marketer.

      Did it hurt my education?

      A little, but guess what? I graduated honors and I am also got a full tuition paid scholarship to college.

      So that proves that being an entrepreneur doesn't hinder your ability to do good in school.
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    • Profile picture of the author TristanPerry
      Originally Posted by Robert Domino View Post

      I wish they focused on school.

      I don't care if you're a teen millionaire. I don't find it successful.

      I would prefer if you were an educated teen.
      Lol.

      I had my first online success when I was around 13/14 (built a website when I was around 11, and 2-3 years later it was starting to get relatively successful and well known in its niche)

      When I was 16 I made quite a few thousand on another online venture (domaining). [Not millions - granted - but a very good amount considering I had no prior experience, read no 'e-books' etc.]

      However despite this, I've been fine in school (top grades)

      As 'Caleb Spilchen' said in reply to you, you seem to be arguing that teenagers who do anything but schoolwork are not educated? (Which is a pretty silly and insulting argument, by the way).

      And as Caleb also - wisely - points out, sometimes doing IM/entrepreneurial stuff as a teen is helpful in education.

      It was for me when I did my GCSEs (16 year old exams), and still is now (am now 20 and doing a maths and computer science degree)

      So in short, your argument seems fairly pointless and fuelled from jealousy. Speaking from experience, being a successul teen doesn't imply poor grades.

      In-fact I'm learning more and more than hands on experience is a heck of a lot better than 90% of what we get taught in formal education.

      I knew more about web design and development at 13 than most people on my computer science degree know at 20. Go figure.

      EDIT: I do agree with CDarklock's views too though. The relative (and absolute) successes I've had thus far haven't been sustainable. It's not like I said at 11, "Okay, I've got this business plan that I know will work". I merely thought "I want to create a website on [subject]" and went from there. Likewise with domaining. However nonetheless I'm very happy of what I've achieved thus far, and I'm glad to have got an early start. I'm also fairly self-aware and I recently realised I've been doing a few things wrong recently (regarding online ventures/projects) and am now actively working to correct these mistakes. Better now than later
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      • Profile picture of the author Robert Domino
        Originally Posted by TristanPerry View Post

        Lol.

        I had my first online success when I was around 13/14 (built a website when I was around 11, and 2-3 years later it was starting to get relatively successful and well known in its niche)

        When I was 16 I made quite a few thousand on another online venture (domaining). [Not millions - granted - but a very good amount considering I had no prior experience, read no 'e-books' etc.]

        However despite this, I've been fine in school (top grades)

        As 'Caleb Spilchen' said in reply to you, you seem to be arguing that teenagers who do anything but schoolwork are not educated? (Which is a pretty silly and insulting argument, by the way).

        And as Caleb also - wisely - points out, sometimes doing IM/entrepreneurial stuff as a teen is helpful in education.

        It was for me when I did my GCSEs (16 year old exams), and still is now (am now 20 and doing a maths and computer science degree)

        So in short, your argument seems fairly pointless and fuelled from jealousy. Speaking from experience, being a successul teen doesn't imply poor grades.

        In-fact I'm learning more and more than hands on experience is a heck of a lot better than 90% of what we get taught in formal education.

        I knew more about web design and development at 13 than most people on my computer science degree know at 20. Go figure.

        EDIT: I do agree with CDarklock's views too though. The relative (and absolute) successes I've had thus far haven't been sustainable. It's not like I said at 11, "Okay, I've got this business plan that I know will work". I merely thought "I want to create a website on [subject]" and went from there. Likewise with domaining. However nonetheless I'm very happy of what I've achieved thus far, and I'm glad to have got an early start. I'm also fairly self-aware and I recently realised I've been doing a few things wrong recently (regarding online ventures/projects) and am now actively working to correct these mistakes. Better now than later
        One more kid that thinks he's the center of the world and that if he succeeds, then it surely means that 100% of teens succeed too and he's a model to follow.

        When I was 20, I bought a website for $1750 and it passively generated 25k during my college years. I also built a few websites over the summer which generated tens of thousands in passive income. One customer alone generated 10k over the years.

        It was more than enough for living expenses. Why would I be jealous?

        "As 'Caleb Spilchen' said in reply to you, you seem to be arguing that teenagers who do anything but schoolwork are not educated? (Which is a pretty silly and insulting argument, by the way)."

        Where the heck do you come from that has all these educated people? I want to go live there. Because in North America, the education level is extremely low. 95% of the population defines itself as liberal, republican or conservative without even knowing what they mean.

        Two seminal texts about the lack of political knowledge / absence of a coherent ideological framework:

        Converse. 1964. The nature of belief systems in mass publics. In Ideology and Discontent, ed. David Apter.

        Larry M. Bartels. American Journal of Political Science, Vol. 40, No. 1 (Feb., 1996), pp. 194-230

        I was a professor's assistant for 2 years and I've graded hundreds of tests and essays. Students are DUMB. They can't use references, they have no idea how to structure an argument and a lot of them haven't even learned basic writing skills. They don't have what it takes because people like the writers on this forum have convinced them that money and fun > knowledge.

        But hey, according to you and your pink glasses, why would they waste time doing school work and reading books when they can make money on internet, right?
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        • Profile picture of the author TristanPerry
          Originally Posted by Robert Domino View Post

          [Pointless, stereotypical drivel]

          But hey, according to you and your pink glasses, why would they waste time doing school work and reading books when they can make money on internet, right?
          Actually your argument seems to be:

          "95% of Americans are DUMB.

          100% of students are DUMB.

          THERE IS NO HOPE!!

          I'm smart though."


          I've never said that school work isn't important. I've never said that books aren't important.

          I've learnt loads books and a decent amount from school work. I'm just pointing out that an 'education' isn't the be-all-and-end-all (sometimes colleges/Unis teach random rubbish which only benefits academic circles and has no tangible benefit to employers nor entrepreneurs/IMers)

          Last year we were having a numerical analysis lecture and one of the students in the lecture room (politely) asked "What application does this theorem have?"

          And the answer? "Erm, none really. It's purely an academic exercise."

          Great stuff. Academia can be fine, but I've sat through entire lectures which have no practical applications whatsoever. And you're saying it's good to basically learn nothing?

          Whilst I don't fully agree with what Thomas Smale was saying earlier (but I do know what he's getting at, to be fair), his point that University can sometimes be a little.. well, poor.. is a fairly accurate one.

          Also you seem to be contradicting yourself since you initially said that teens should focus on school, but you then go onto say that higher education is useless and that 100% of students are "DUMB".

          If things are as hopeless as you suggest, then surely you're basically arguing that "DUMB" students should avoid school and higher education like the plague?
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          • Profile picture of the author Robert Domino
            Originally Posted by TristanPerry View Post

            Also you seem to be contradicting yourself since you initially said that teens should focus on school, but you then go onto say that higher education is useless and that 100% of students are "DUMB".

            If things are as hopeless as you suggest, then surely you're basically arguing that "DUMB" students should avoid school and higher education like the plague?
            There's no contradiction at all.

            The point is this:

            1) People devalue education and put all the emphasis on making money.

            IE: the guy's comment on page 2 about how people would choose 2 million dollars over a college education.

            2) Education system shifts from general knowledge and tries to adapt to the job market.

            IE: all the technical schools and programs. Here, they now talk about the "skills" you acquired and not the knowledge you gained.

            3) Education system gets under-funded since it isn't considered top priority (after all, it makes no money!)

            IE: teachers are paid peanuts, students don't respect them, a large portion of teachers quit before they reach 5 years..

            Result?
            You grade hundreds of tests and essays which are terrible. If we didn't ARTIFICIALLY inflate grades, sometimes the average would be below passing grade.

            Who's to blame.. education, or the people that devalue its importance like some of the writers here?

            PS: Due to selection, past the baccalaureate students are no longer dumb.
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            • Profile picture of the author CDarklock
              Originally Posted by Robert Domino View Post

              1) People devalue education
              This isn't happening the way you think.

              Education is devalued because we have gotten three very stupid ideas into our heads.

              1. Everyone should graduate high school. This means you have to lower the bar on graduation until the stupid kids can get over it.

              2. Everyone should go to college. This means you have to lower the bar on admission until the stupid kids can get over it.

              3. The way to teach anything is to explain it over and over. This means you repeat stupid crap to kids who already know it for years, because you're trying to pound it into the heads of the stupid kids so they can graduate and go to college.

              We have turned entitlement to an education into an entitlement to graduation.

              We don't care whether you're actually educated. We just want you to have that piece of paper. And if you can have that piece of paper for doing damn near nothing, why would you work harder? What is the apparent value of educating yourself?

              Pretty much jack squat.

              It's not making money that has devalued education. It's the educational system. It's stupid and it's boring and it doesn't even work.

              And it's your own damn fault.

              You have to inflate the grades because you will inflate the grades. If you failed a whole class of people because they didn't do a good job, they might actually give a crap about doing a good job. But hey, that might hurt the results on your standardised tests.
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              "The Golden Town is the Golden Town no longer. They have sold their pillars for brass and their temples for money, they have made coins out of their golden doors. It is become a dark town full of trouble, there is no ease in its streets, beauty has left it and the old songs are gone." - Lord Dunsany, The Messengers
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              • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
                Originally Posted by CDarklock View Post


                2. Everyone should go to college. This means you have to lower the bar on admission until the stupid kids can get over it.
                A side effect of this is that every vocational school, business school, beauty school, you name it, is now a "college".

                I hate using this phrase, but it applies, so what the heck...

                Back in my day:

                > Some kids didn't make it out of high school, for a variety of reasons.

                > Some had no interest in going past high school, but wanted to learn how to make a decent living. For that, we had "vocational-technical institutes" which were perfectly respectable.

                > Some weren't prepared for going to a university, or they wanted to train for a career in either a more technical field than the vo-techs handled, or they wanted to get into a support role in the business world. That was covered by community colleges, schools of business, secretarial schools, etc.

                > Some went on to colleges and universities to study. Some went purely for a liberal education, some to learn a profession like medicine, law or engineering that required higher levels of study. Some went for the "MRS" degree (sorry, ladies, but it was true).

                At least in my corner of the world, if you made an honest living, you were generally respected for doing so.

                Somewhere along the line, that changed. And we end up in the mess we're in now. Where are we headed?

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              • Profile picture of the author patadeperro
                Originally Posted by CDarklock View Post

                We don't care whether you're actually educated. We just want you to have that piece of paper. And if you can have that piece of paper for doing damn near nothing, why would you work harder? What is the apparent value of educating yourself?
                EXACTLY!!!!

                We have confuse education with "just put a bunch of information in your head, don't think, just repeat".
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  • Profile picture of the author John Atkins
    Originally Posted by Daniel Brock View Post



    What about that one 14 year old girl who made a million+ off those myspace layouts?
    I take it you're talking about the girl behind whateverlife right?

    First of all she didn't make over 1 million dollars that same year,
    sources say she made that money about 2 years later.

    Secondly, she didn't make that money because she was a good
    marketer. As a matter of fact she's not even a marketer, she's
    just a webmaster. She just started a website where she put good
    layouts, and luckily the website got popular with word of mouth.

    My point here is... to find a teen 13-17 who's an expert marketer
    is very, very rare. You see you become a good marketer mostly
    because of experience, not because you read lots of stuff.

    Those 'teens' who claim that they make millions from marketing,
    most of them aren't teens at all.

    Sure, it is possible but it's highly unlikely.

    You see claiming that you're a teen is a great marketing
    trick which works well, if you're targeting newbies.

    They think "hey, if a 16 year old can make millions with this,
    I can do it too"...
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  • Profile picture of the author Zabrina
    I started as a teen, though on the older side -- I was 17 when I first learned about making money online. It took me about two to three months to start making money, and a year to turn it into a full-time income.

    I'm not the traditional teen, though. If I fail, I have consequences. My parents can't afford to give me more money if I crash and burn. I'm paying for my own university degree -- no college funds, no student loans, and whatever grade-based scholarships I can find (just the "default" one from my school so far).

    At least I have another home to go to if I crash and burn after moving out, but that's about it. I see people making the mistake of thinking that all teens can just "run back to their parents and get more money to try again", but that's a pretty broad statement.

    I have to work part-time to full-time (luckily, I worked hard enough this summer that I can afford to only work part-time this school year, unlike last year) alongside full-time school and trying to maintain a social life, volunteering as much as I can, etc. But that's motivation for ya.
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  • Profile picture of the author Caleb Spilchen
    @Thomas - I am certainly not top of my class.
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  • Profile picture of the author Caleb Spilchen
    @Robert - I would worry for a teen working for two weeks, then only cashing in on $20. That's like my hourly wage, for a job for family/friends .

    Honestly if you can only earn $20 in two weeks, you need to read the Warrior Forum MORE.
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    • Profile picture of the author Robert Domino
      Originally Posted by Caleb Spilchen View Post

      @Robert - I would worry for a teen working for two weeks, then only cashing in on $20. That's like my hourly wage, for a job for family/friends .

      Honestly if you can only earn $20 in two weeks, you need to read the Warrior Forum MORE.
      They were on the Warrior Forum and had a ton of people congratulating them.
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  • Profile picture of the author enterpryzman
    I find this interesting as well....I am soo very creative in my thinking. I have obtained patents and sold them ( at 22 ) and started several offline business ventures that continue today.

    If the Internet would have existed when I was young, I truly feel I would be way ahead of my present position. I completely envy what lies in front of them and hope they find the wisdom to do the right things and build a future.

    Best wishes to the OP and Caleb who I have been speaking with a few weeks now, go for it young guys and gals !

    Enterpryzman
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  • Profile picture of the author Thomas Lucas
    Education is very valuable. Although you must admit, given the choice, most people would probably choose the millions of dollars over higher education.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jacqueline Smith
    Children - and teens - understand so much more than you think. Half of what you think they don't get, they get, and they get that you don't think they'll get it. They understand just how little you think of them. How you dismiss them.

    Thank you CDarklock!!!!!

    Everyone......please read that over and over again and think about it the next time you are interacting with a child or teen.
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    • Profile picture of the author Shannon Spoon
      I really like this quote from the Breakfast Club

      "And these children that you spit on
      As they try to change their worlds
      Are immune to your consultations
      They're quite aware
      of what they're going through"

      - From David Bowie's "Changes"
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      • Profile picture of the author Silas Hart
        I've been making money off and on the internet for years. I often read about teens claiming to make thousands each month, but usually with minimal investigation, they make less than a guy selling sand in the desert. I experienced this just about every single day when I was working heavily in RMT. (MMORPG's) But then again, the same can be said about people not in their teens.

        Their are of course people who have legitimate proof that they make serious cash doing what they do, as the internet knows no age.
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    • Profile picture of the author CDarklock
      Originally Posted by Jaqs View Post

      Everyone......please read that over and over again and think about it the next time you are interacting with a child or teen.
      The flip side of it is, when you get to college: everything changes. They will expect you to work like hell, and it's not going to be what you were studying last year.

      And if you've gotten complacent in the last several years - like I did - you'll be scrambling. You might squeeze out a diploma, but if you want honours of any kind, you need to develop some SERIOUS discipline in those last couple years of high school.

      Things get so damned boring and crappy in high school. And on some level, you think that will be what real life is like... but it's not. High school is a joke, and you're supposed to be doing a bunch of crap outside it, but nobody really tells you that. There's just this vague hint that colleges look at your extracurriculars. But in high school, the social thing and the school thing are almost irrelevant - your extracurriculars are everything.
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  • Profile picture of the author abhi1
    I myself started as a teen and I have to say, the experience was worth every effort.
    It was 6 years back when I got into IM and making money online (am 19 now). It has helped me stand up and understand my responsibilities. Now I really know how important money is, I know its value and how hard it is to earn.
    In short, it made me aware of some realities well before my time and well, it has helped me prepare for the world a little bit sooner.
    So yea, if you're a teen and into IM, its not only the money that you're dealing with..its the EXPERIENCE too.
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  • Profile picture of the author MrDay
    The internet game has changed and the "make money online" niche has attracted many different demographics, including youngsters. I learn from some, teach some and make money from some.

    You've got to just accept it and make the most of it. If you're an internet marketer, then you already know how to adapt, evolve and go with the flow.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alfred Shelver
    I am Very Jealous Imagine having started at 15 and sticking to it that would have been Incredible.

    But I am also glad that I just started many have not even discovered the power of the Internet, and many marketers Don't utilize it properly so yes I am jealous but happy that I still could achieve no matter my age.
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  • Profile picture of the author BeauJustin
    I much rather the youth be out seeking their fortunes on the Internet
    than dying in the dungeon of middle management.

    "I need those TPI reports. Didn't you read the memo?"
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    • Profile picture of the author Mohammad Afaq
      Originally Posted by BeauJustin View Post

      I much rather the youth be out seeking their fortunes on the Internet
      than dying in the dungeon of middle management.

      "I need those TPI reports. Didn't you read the memo?"
      VERY true

      Now that I am out of high school and I have to start thinking about gas, bills, car, books etc I am actually starting to realize that it really isn't easy to try and "make it" while trying to keep a roof over your head.

      Good for me, I figured this whole IM thing before I turned 17 and now it's all about doing it over and over again
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  • Profile picture of the author Joe Benjamin
    They're awesome.

    I was one of the fortunate ones in my early teens to
    have learned about marketing very, very early in life
    with a highly successful candy store for 2-3 years.

    We did a lot of the classic marketing moves I still do
    till this day in almost all of my offline businesses.

    The methods changed, but the principle is still the
    same...it was my first real job. So, when I got a 9 to
    5, it was like a blow to the gut.

    Maybe it's just because I'm 21 just coming out of
    the teens, but obviously I find it a blessing in my
    own life to have had good success at a very early
    age.
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  • Profile picture of the author Bicycle Cat
    I'm 18, one of the top students in my class and starting to earn money with IM.
    I could have the best of both worlds!

    Personally, I don't mind teenage marketers that are younger than me. Better than being on the streets, taking drugs, drinking alcohol and causing social unrest that I always hear about.
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  • Profile picture of the author barrycfleming
    I think it's cool, My nephew is 20 now, but he has been "killin it" on the internet for a few yars now. Sure give them all a shot if they can make it.

    Barry
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  • Profile picture of the author Tomwood
    I think it's great as long as they don't let it take over there live teenagers also need to go to school, develop their life and social skill etc.
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  • Profile picture of the author Anoopchawla
    That's cool. They have learned one of the most imp. skill in life.
    Whats the use of higher education if it can't give you the lifestyle you deserve.
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  • Profile picture of the author theemperor
    I'm jealous, not of their money per-se but that they have the chance to do this, it is so accessible. When I was 13 I did have internet access but there was scant information, not as many people used it and the cost per minute of the phone bill was astronomical, and the connection speed was appalling!

    Good luck to them. No reason why they can't do it. There will be 16 year old millionaires from this. I am not jealous of the money in the same way I am not jealous of lottery winners - there is no point as being jealous doesn't help me make more sales

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  • Profile picture of the author tommydesmond
    I think it's absolutely GREAT. There's no part of teens making millions that I could complain about.

    Jealous about it? I don't understand this idea, It presupposes that there's a finite amount of money laying around and these evil teens are cutting too wide a pie slice for themselves relative to their life experience. That's BS. Wealth begets wealth.

    Saying that teens lack long-term vision is also pretty broad. What if the "long-term vision" of a teen is to make $5 million dollars before they're 20 and surf for the rest of their life while living in a cost effective way? I'd say that's damn smarter than many of the (adult) millionaires I watch blow their cash on garbage like massive home theatres and garages full of cars. I know one guy with a Rolex collection... a collection? Stupid.

    In Response to the "stay in school" reply:
    I'd have to state that what passes for "education" in America, I consider "training", and those things are entirely different. If my children made a million dollars and then told me they wanted to take 5 years off to travel the world and study the Great Books while they learned to sail... then yeah, I consider that an education even if they never finished high school and I'd be all for it.

    Education like what we have now is entirely for employees, not owners, and I want to raise owners.

    Absorbing as much programming as possible from teachers who are on the bare base of survival is NOT education as far as I'm concerned, and I'd prefer to insulate my children from it, not squeeze them into it.
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    • Profile picture of the author REHughes
      Personally I can't see anything wrong with teens becoming successful on the internet. After all, it is we as parents who buy them their first laptop at age 10-12(although not myself - my kids saw the invention of the CD player! ). It is we who feel it is ok for them to have a cell phone at 8 or 9 or 10 or whatever age you feel comfortable with. It is we who allow them to sit and play video games for hours on end, AFTER they have done their homework, of course.
      So, why shouldn't we be PROUD that instead of taking for granted all of the technology we place in their hands every day they actually apply that TALENT they have to something meaningful.
      I have tried to compete, for fun, with CHILDREN at video games, and I lost. I have tried to out-text on my phone a 10 year old - I lost. I don't know the names of even 2 - let's say - transformers:confused:. But I have a nephew that can name every one ever made - the colors, abilities, accessories, etc. of every one of them, and even knows which ones to sell for how much at our local flea market - and by the way, he's 12, I think.
      My point is that at a young age they are very adaptable to learning new concepts. They, for the most part, are able to absorb and retain knowledge at a rate and capacity that most adults can't compete with. And they haven't learned yet that life can be hard. If they have a setback, hey, it's just another day to them. They rebound and usually come back stronger than before.
      They are very resilient at a young age.
      And, living in a world driven by technology, they are actually on the cutting edge of the future.
      For many, they are getting a HIGHER EDUCATION than many, if not most, will ever dream of. It's called hands-on-experience.
      Now, I am in no way implying a formal education isn't healthy because I am a firm believer in that.
      I also see, on the other hand, more often than not, college graduates NEVER entering the field of their study, or if they do, at most making a meager living. Many of those never advance to a level they might have thought they would when entering college. Not all, but many. I do see some, more especially in the healthcare field, who continue in their chosen field, and quite a few of those manage to land good paying jobs. But, only a small percentage of those have I seen go on to become doctors and earn an exceptional income.
      This is just an example.
      I have a neice who just graduated from a reputable college in the south with a Masters degree in clinical psychology. Eight years of college, I believe. She is now going into her field of study NEAR ATLANTA at a starting rate of about $42,000 per year(in all honesty, this IS the lower end of the payscale for this profession, but jobs aren't readily available). But, for 8 years of college? And who knows what it cost her.
      I'm just saying, these kids learning to make it online, IF they apply themselves as diligently outside this arena as they do inside it have a chance at a future most of us older folks only dream about. They are gaining the real world experience PLUS the SCHOOLING that a college degree may never be able to confer to them.
      So, I applaud you young folks. Keep up your studies WHILE you work at this, and you may just be the PIONEERS that others will someday look back at and say - WOW, did they really do that?
      So, if you are able to succeed in this world of marketing at a young age, and it DOESN'T stop you from obtaining at the very least a high school education, then by all means, GO FOR IT!
      At least you aren't just another statistic taking up space in the local jail somewhere.
      Just MHO.
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  • Profile picture of the author Caleb Spilchen
    This year won't be great, since it was my start-up and get really into my businesses, and get them all going. Next year will be when it happens
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    • Profile picture of the author Robert Domino
      Gosh people replying to my first post are simple minded.

      As was said, it's a statistically proven fact that teens who work over 14 hours a week are more likely to drop out. Just because YOU haven't dropped out doesn't make you the rule.

      The "school of life" and all that is just BS. There is a level of intellectual refinement gained as you progress in your studies.

      In fact, the more you learn and the more you realize you don't know a lot.

      That certainly contradicts the people here who think teens "know everything" and "understand more than you think". They don't, they just think they do.

      When I was in elementary school and I learned to count and add up numbers, I thought I had it all figured out. When I failed Linear Algebra and Vector Geometry later on, I realized that mathematics was a lot more complex than simply adding up.

      As you progress with your studies you're constantly confronted with what you don't know. Instead of doing nothing and getting good grades as you did in high school, you're surrounded with people who are equally knowledgeable and challenge you.

      Well guess what, the world is a lot more complex than learning how to make money.
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      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
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        • Profile picture of the author bretski
          Personally, I could care less how many years someone has been on the face of the planet. In my interactions with folks here there are those that act their age, act younger than their age and also those that are wise beyond their years.

          If someone is able to make money online at the age of 13-18 then all the more power to them. Don't care. It doesn't affect me or my business unless I allow it to get into my head and that is just a waste of my time and energy. If one of my kids did decide to get into IM though, then I have an interest and a reason to give a marketer's age thought.

          I have actually learned MORE from some marketers that are younger than my daughter and who I know are more intelligent than me. On the other hand, there are marketers that are young and cocky and lack life experience that very well may hinder them in the long run. Divorces, financial woes, stress, responsibilities and a train wreck of a life at times actually works in my favor when it comes to this stuff! Whoda thunk!?
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      • Profile picture of the author TristanPerry
        Originally Posted by Robert Domino View Post

        When I was in elementary school and I learned to count and add up numbers, I thought I had it all figured out. When I failed Linear Algebra and Vector Geometry later on, I realized that mathematics was a lot more complex than simply adding up.
        I passed Linear Algebra and Vector Geometry 1 month ago (when I got my results).

        Despite me starting online ventrues when I was 11.

        Just saying.

        And I agree that mathematics is a lot more complex than just adding up, but (as someone doing a partial maths degree), you've got to admit that 90% of the math(s) they teach at 'higher' level is pretty pointless, right?

        Anywhoo, you seem to be arguing that since I started online ventures at 11 I should have failed Linear Algebra and Vector Geometry?

        I agree that it's not as easy when you get older. But it's not impossible. Nor does it mean that - since I'm having a 'real' education (whatever that is) I shouldn't be online.

        Originally Posted by Caleb Spilchen View Post

        That's what I thought it seemed like. What did you take in high school for web dev? (just wondering.) I've got a couple computer courses.
        I learnt my web dev stuff myself via books and all, starting when I was 11 I made a website on a hobby I had at the time and it got pretty popular (forums had 1.3 million posts, 10,000+ members etc years later) so I got a fair amount of experience from that.

        The uni I go to (to do a mathematics and computer science degree) had a 'web development' course/module, although it was fairly basic stuff (hence why I said that I knew more about web dev at 13 than many 20 year olds on my course)

        But yeah, the way I learnt was via books and websites like w3schools and then a lot of practise
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      • Profile picture of the author CDarklock
        Originally Posted by Robert Domino View Post

        That certainly contradicts the people here who think teens "know everything" and "understand more than you think".
        I find it terribly ironic that when I say teens understand more than people think, and recognise that you are unfairly dismissing them...

        You come back to claim that they most certainly do not, and thus unfairly dismiss them.

        Teens today have unprecedented access to information.

        And here you are, sniffing in disdain, as though they have done NOTHING with it. Learned nothing. Accomplished nothing. Understood nothing.

        But intelligence scores are rising every single year. The average high school graduate today has the equivalent of a 130 IQ in the 1970s.

        So compared to my generation, their average intelligence level is genius.
        Ignore that at your own peril. I won't.
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  • Profile picture of the author DireStraits
    Originally Posted by Daniel Brock View Post

    How goes it Warriors?

    I thought this would make for an interesting debate.

    What do you all think about teen marketers?

    Particularly the ones in the 13-17 year range...

    The reason I ask, is because I was reading a thread about some 16 year old who was supposedly making millions of dollars online.

    It seemed that everyone was either a bit jealous, or at least a bit skeptical.

    Being skeptical is OK, but a lot of people were trying to put the person down because of their age.

    'I don't believe it because kids that age are too busy worrying about other non important stuff'

    Is it really that hard to believe that young kids these days can make a killing online?

    What about that one 14 year old girl who made a million+ off those myspace layouts?

    I mean certainly it is possible, and I speak from experience here.

    When I was 16 I started a web hosting company and by the time I was 18 I did nearly $200,000 in business.

    Now for web hosting, I can see the potential problem of a 16 year old running it. You know, people have their businesses running off the servers, the host could lose interest and run, etc.

    But we're talking selling ebooks, digital goods, and affiliate commissions here...

    Not so much that can go wrong there.

    I just don't understand what all the fuss is about...

    Shouldn't we be applauding these kids for doing something that most people never even attempt?

    What are your thoughts?

    -Dan Brock
    That's interesting, Dan. I started making my first money online with a web hosting and domain registration business, too -- also when I was 15/16.

    As such, I'd be a hypocrite to say there's anything wrong with teenagers making money online. But even if it wasn't for that, I don't see the issue.

    If you can do it, why shouldn't you?

    After all, the main reason we're encouraged to try hard at school and progress to higher education or take up a good trade is so we can give ourselves the best shot at having a good career - or, more specifically - earning a good income, right?

    Does it really matter then if that individual decides he or she wishes to make his or her living (or fortune) online?

    Absolutely, not, in my opinion. In fact, I think it's a brilliant thing. More power to them!

    Money is money, and if you're good at what you do and enjoy doing it, then all the better.
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  • Profile picture of the author IMAdam
    I think it's great. If you are that smart and mature enough to make good money at that age, more power to you. The only road block maybe respect and credibility at that age.
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  • Profile picture of the author stephfoster
    I'd love for any of my kids to be teen marketers. Got a few years before even the oldest hits that point, though. On the other hand she is interested in starting her first website. She was shocked when I explained that she'd have to create her own content, but then 8 year olds aren't always all that grounded in reality. She's trying, though.

    I always tell my kids to get that education even if they're following their dreams. You never know where life will take you. I never pictured myself as a work at home mom until it happened, and the idea of starting a business was foreign until I decided to do it. Now I'm glad I did, but glad to have my education as well.
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  • Profile picture of the author KenThompson
    Hello everyone... fascinating reading in this thread. A lot of discussion
    about education and perspectives. Much of it has stirred a lot of memories
    from my own experiences. I'm not surprised at the insights expressed by
    so many of you.

    In many ways it seems the education system in the US is one big soup
    sandwich. At this point in my life, I think the most valuable skill any education
    system can do is teach people how to think critically. After so many years
    of working and living, there's much to be said for learning the basics such
    as reading and writing. Of course I'm referring to gaining real competence
    and mastery of those basic skills.

    I'm embarrassingly over-educated, but that's quite all right because knowledge
    that most would consider useless contributes to a richer mind, in my opinion,
    and also a more rewarding lens through which to view life.

    For most, there will be changes in perspective as age progresses. Some of
    the comments reminded me of different parts of my life. The things I wanted
    to do but didn't because of whatever reason. Looking back, I'm glad I did
    not do those things because I knew I wouldn't have been happy. Very few
    people are in a position to know what something will truly be like before they
    become immersed in it, before they actually spend some time doing it.

    When it comes to something like an education and the career/work that results
    from that education, that's a tremendously huge thing to consider and realize.

    Please bear in mind that I'm not trying to preach to you. My attitude is not
    one of condescension. You're all bright and intelligent. But, there's always a
    but, lol... it's really true that there's a profound difference between the
    intellectual realization of something and living the experience. Know what I mean?

    Trade-offs. It's an ugly two letter word. Butt ugly. FUGLY, even. But there's
    no getting around it, I suppose. But the flip side of that is there are good things
    you get in return for the compromises and trade-offs. That's the only saving
    grace, and the only thing that helps us retain our sanity.

    I don't want to be accused of rambling. So I'll just offer and encourage you to
    keep doing what it is you're doing. Money can give you options in your lives.
    Options make all the difference. But perhaps, if I may, keep in mind that money
    is a hammer, or a nail, or a screwdriver. It's just a tool that's meant to be used
    for other things that are more important. Hope you don't mind me saying that.

    Thanks for your time.

    Ken
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  • Profile picture of the author Caleb Spilchen
    @Tristian Perry.

    That's what I thought it seemed like. What did you take in high school for web dev? (just wondering.) I've got a couple computer courses.
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  • Profile picture of the author R Hagel
    Teen marketers, rich teens, slacker teens... none of that matters to me, because I bang my cane and chase them all off my lawn with equal enthusiasm.


    ***

    On topic...

    As others have touched on in this thread, the thing I like about many teens is that they act invincible. It doesn't occur to some of them that there's a possibility of failure. Some of 'em think big and then take big action, fueled by passion, a dream and a desire to succeed.

    Sometimes when folks get a little older (and start taking on more responsibilities) they're not as willing to think big and take big risks. If someone with more financial obligations fail, then they've failed on a bigger level. They might not just fail themselves, they could fail their family, lose the car, lose the house, etc. And so this fear of failure can hold 'em back.

    Some teens -- especially young teens -- don't have such big consequences for failure. So they don't have fear hanging around their neck like a 500-pound lead ball.

    Of course some teens do have fear and responsibilities... and some adults don't. I'm not trying to paint folks with a broad brush. I'm just saying that some young folks have a "sky's the limit" optimism backed up with the ability to take action.

    Cheers,
    Becky
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  • Profile picture of the author tylerdrun
    I don't understand why the old people have to be jealous or sound skeptical about the teenager's success...

    The teenager's enter into the foray due to a few main reasons:

    The reason I entered is poor finances or in other words poor well being. My parents weren't that great and they didn't earn a good income(income that other kid's parents used to earn in my school and stuff)... So for most of my childhood, all my desires weren't fulfilled. No vacations, etc.

    But when I turned 13, I had big goals in my mind and went after them right away. That has taken me to where I am now. And now I can say that I am at the worst yet the best situation in my life...

    This is one of the moments when life puts you down on your knees and make you cry. It tells you to give up and says that you are nothing. Nothin will go right for you.. But you whisper with hope, "I will try again. I won't give up"...

    What situation I am in?
    Both my parents don't have a job right now and I am in debt(school fees, household expenses, etc). My income isn't that great yet. So I am still running around.

    Plus with the frustrations at school. The teachers yelling at you... You are not able to concentrate on your studies and at the same time, you are failing your teachers because of your other responsiblilites. Things like that are like a turning point.

    You can clearly say, that I've had enough and I want to give up... But no, life isn't temporary. Life won't let you go without rewarding you.

    Life is eternal. It's important that you have to grasp this fact... The things you are experiencing right now is just training to make you strong.

    When the coaches used to make the kids run in the soccer pitch, the kids would mostly hate it because of the running involved. They just wanna play but don't want to run. But that RUNNING is crucial to your skill building in any sport... Your stamina is crucial.

    And I believe that GOD is giving me the stamina or the fuel, I will require to stand up...

    You have to understand this:

    Even kids experience troubles... In fact, there are lot more troubles than you can imagine. At least, you are adults... Your shortcomings will definitely be pointed out severely. But maybe not for most kids like us...

    But it's the other way around for me... I AM THE CAUSE FOR ALL PROBLEMS THEY ARE FACING... according to my family, relatives, teachers, etc. Even though I didn't create it in the first place...

    The conclusion is each of us has our own fair share of responsibilites and we are considered about it more than anything else. That's why we still haven't made that million dollars or billion dollars.

    How much money you are making doesn't matter as long as you are accepting responsiblity for your life and doing all that you can do. Because life will reward you in time...

    OLDER PEOPLE HAVE A GREAT ADVANTAGE. They can think long term... They can set goals for two years from now and expect time to fly by and end up achieving that goal.

    But kids like us... are still under the process of trasformation. We are still moving from short term to long term results, instant to late gratification...
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  • Profile picture of the author JeffLam
    1) I'm jealous of anyone younger than me (<21) and making the big bucks. It doesn't help that 2 of my prime years (18-19) are taken up by conscription in the military.

    2) That being said in #1, it motivates me to get my a** in gear to catch up with them.

    3) I belong to the group that believes in the School Knocks and that Teen (or ANY) Millionaire > Educated Kids.

    From where I come from, there's too many educated kids who are born with a silver spoon, and basically spend their parents money till they get their degree. Life is too easy for them.

    I myself got 5As and 1B in my GCE A levels by Cambridge. A result that could have got me in some top schools (I think) if I had the money (read: Parents' Money) to pay for my overseas education and life, but here I am, trying my best to start my own business and trying my best not to take anything from my parents.

    Btw, I did enrol in a local University Business course, and managed to get a bond free scholarship; hence accomplishing 1 step of my goal of not taking any money from my parents.

    Afterall, I'm >20.
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    • Profile picture of the author TristanPerry
      Originally Posted by JeffLam View Post

      1) I'm jealous of anyone younger than me (<21) and making the big bucks. It doesn't help that 2 of my prime years (18-19) are taken up by conscription in the military.

      2) That being said in #1, it motivates me to get my a** in gear to catch up with them.

      3) I belong to the group that believes in the School Knocks and that Teen (or ANY) Millionaire > Educated Kids.

      From where I come from, there's too many educated kids who are born with a silver spoon, and basically spend their parents money till they get their degree. Life is too easy for them.

      I myself got 5As and 1B in my GCE A levels by Cambridge. A result that could have got me in some top schools (I think) if I had the money (read: Parents' Money) to pay for my overseas education and life, but here I am, trying my best to start my own business and trying my best not to take anything from my parents.

      Btw, I did enrol in a local University Business course, and managed to get a bond free scholarship; hence accomplishing 1 step of my goal of not taking any money from my parents.

      Afterall, I'm >20.
      Wow, your grades are great (as Alexa says, you'd be odds-on to get into Oxbridge here). It sounds like you're doing very well with the cards you've been dealt, and I'm sure you'll continue to do well
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    • Profile picture of the author Scott Kennedy
      Originally Posted by JeffLam View Post

      1) I'm jealous of anyone younger than me (<21) and making the big bucks. It doesn't help that 2 of my prime years (18-19) are taken up by conscription in the military.

      2) That being said in #1, it motivates me to get my a** in gear to catch up with them.

      3) I belong to the group that believes in the School Knocks and that Teen (or ANY) Millionaire > Educated Kids.

      From where I come from, there's too many educated kids who are born with a silver spoon, and basically spend their parents money till they get their degree. Life is too easy for them.

      I myself got 5As and 1B in my GCE A levels by Cambridge. A result that could have got me in some top schools (I think) if I had the money (read: Parents' Money) to pay for my overseas education and life, but here I am, trying my best to start my own business and trying my best not to take anything from my parents.

      Btw, I did enrol in a local University Business course, and managed to get a bond free scholarship; hence accomplishing 1 step of my goal of not taking any money from my parents.

      Afterall, I'm >20.
      Walao! So you're not at university? SMU offers quite a number of scholarships so I think it would be worthwhile contacting them (was at SMU for 1.5 years before transfering back to Aus). Send me a PM if you're interested and I will contact some people.
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  • Profile picture of the author DrewClement
    Formal education will make you a living...

    Self-education will make you a fortune...
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  • Hey it's a free world and if the younger generation can market online and make money then good for them. Surely that is better than playing computer games all weekend. The internet is the way forward so they are equiping themselves for their future which I think is very wise. As long as they still maintain their friendships through school they'll be fine.
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  • Profile picture of the author Caleb Spilchen

    I was a professor's assistant for 2 years and I've graded hundreds of tests and essays. Students are DUMB
    I'm sure you the professors assistant have an idea of what 'stereotype' means, but hey. I should just refresh your memory


    A stereotype is a commonly held public belief about specific social groups, or types of individuals. The concepts of "stereotype" and "prejudice" are often confused with many other different meanings. ..
    So, because theres a few not-so-smart kids in the egg basket, why in the world would you say that all students are dumb....

    We were all students once.... It's very UNFAIR for you to judge us, and I don't think you'll make many friends by calling all "students" dumb. That's just my opinion. Feel free to call me dumb to.
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    • Profile picture of the author Thomas Smale
      Originally Posted by Caleb Spilchen View Post

      So, because theres a few not-so-smart kids in the egg basket, why in the world would you say that all students are dumb....

      We were all students once.... It's very UNFAIR for you to judge us, and I don't think you'll make many friends by calling all "students" dumb. That's just my opinion. Feel free to call me dumb to.
      Playing Devil's Advocate for a second, I just graduated a top 10 UK university with an Honours Degree, and my opinion is that the vast majority of students are dumb. Even the "high" achievers on my course with straight A's used to ask me to proof read their essays as they would be so poorly written. Most can't spell, use grammar properly, do basic adding/subtracting in their head, understand long words etc.

      Perhaps it wasn't worded particularly well, but you are over-estimating the abilities of the average student. I personally think a combination of real world and academic experience are essential for everyone to "succeed" in life.
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      • Profile picture of the author KenThompson
        Originally Posted by Thomas Smale View Post

        Playing Devil's Advocate for a second, I just graduated a top 10 UK university with an Honours Degree, and my opinion is that the vast majority of students are dumb. Even the "high" achievers on my course with straight A's used to ask me to proof read their essays as they would be so poorly written. Most can't spell, use grammar properly, do basic adding/subtracting in their head, understand long words.
        My sister is a professor at a respected university. No one here would want
        to hear what she has to say on this matter.


        Ken
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        • Profile picture of the author Thomas Smale
          Originally Posted by KenThompson View Post

          My sister is a professor at a respected university. No one here would want
          to hear what she has to say on this matter.


          Ken
          Oh, I would...
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      • Profile picture of the author TristanPerry
        Originally Posted by Thomas Smale View Post

        Playing Devil's Advocate for a second, I just graduated a top 10 UK university with an Honours Degree, and my opinion is that the vast majority of students are dumb. Even the "high" achievers on my course with straight A's used to ask me to proof read their essays as they would be so poorly written. Most can't spell, use grammar properly, do basic adding/subtracting in their head, understand long words etc.

        Perhaps it wasn't worded particularly well, but you are over-estimating the abilities of the average student. I personally think a combination of real world and academic experience are essential for everyone to "succeed" in life.
        I agree with your very last line in that real World experience is of course necessary.

        However.. do you honestly believe that most - so more than 50% - of students can't spell, use gramatically correct English, do very basic numeracy and understand 'long' words? Really? :confused:

        I'd honestly be surprised if even 5% of the students I come across (at a non "top 10" University..) are basically illiterate and innumerate... let alone the >50% amount that you are suggesting?

        Am I missing something? :confused:

        Your post seems to be somewhat two-halved. Your first half is basically saying that more than 50% of us are thick and ultimately pointless. Your second half is then talking in practical terms - saying that in ability and real World-terms, many students need to realise that solely academia won't cut it in the real World (something I completely agree with). But as I say, your post seems two-halved and somewhat.. well.. confusing/insulting?
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        • Profile picture of the author Thomas Smale
          Originally Posted by TristanPerry View Post

          However.. do you honestly believe that most - so more than 50% - of students can't spell, use gramatically correct English, do very basic numeracy and understand 'long' words? Really? :confused:

          I'd honestly be surprised if even 5% of the students I come across (at a non "top 10" University..) are basically illiterate and innumerate... let alone the >50% amount that you are suggesting?

          Am I missing something? :confused:
          Well I guess it depends where you set your standards. My written english is far from perfect and I can assure you a lot of the stuff I have read is terrible and far worse than my own work.

          I remember when we had verbal and numerical reasoning tests for our industrial placement interviews, a majority scored terribly as they were all book smart and had absolutely no ability to think for themselves. I don't really want to go on a rant about my views on private education and how people slip through the net into good unis - that's probably something I'll save for a book
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          • Profile picture of the author TristanPerry
            Originally Posted by Thomas Smale View Post

            Well I guess it depends where you set your standards. My written english is far from perfect and I can assure you a lot of the stuff I have read is terrible and far worse than my own work.

            I remember when we had verbal and numerical reasoning tests for our industrial placement interviews, a majority scored terribly as they were all book smart and had absolutely no ability to think for themselves. I don't really want to go on a rant about my views on private education and how people slip through the net into good unis - that's probably something I'll save for a book
            I honestly don't know of anyone who is book smart (heck, or even an 'average' student) who basically can't spell or do basic maths.

            I agree that the system isn't perfect though, although I do think you're under-estimating students somewhat (and this is coming from someone who earlier claimed - which I continue to strongly believe - that I knew more about web development at 13 than many of my friends do mid-way through their compsci degree at 20 :p)

            You're right that some people do slip through the net and get into great Unis despite having zero real World experience. Although I guess that's life really, and it isn't limited solely to academia (albeit in a 'real' job I guess you can't 'wing it' as easily )
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        • Profile picture of the author Thomas Smale
          Originally Posted by TristanPerry View Post

          Your post seems to be somewhat two-halved. Your first half is basically saying that more than 50% of us are thick and ultimately pointless. Your second half is then talking in practical terms - saying that in ability and real World-terms, many students need to realise that solely academia won't cut it in the real World (something I completely agree with). But as I say, your post seems two-halved and somewhat.. well.. confusing/insulting?
          I'm saying that a number of people aren't as smart as they think, despite their educational background. I don't think university level education is very good at all, hence why a good mix is important. Those that think it should be all education or all work are wrong, in my opinion. Perhaps I'm not making complete sense, it's been a long day!
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          • Profile picture of the author TristanPerry
            Originally Posted by Thomas Smale View Post

            I'm saying that a number of people aren't as smart as they think, despite their educational background. I don't think university level education is very good at all, hence why a good mix is important. Those that think it should be all education or all work are wrong, in my opinion. Perhaps I'm not making complete sense, it's been a long day!
            Yeah I agree with that. I guess I just got confused since you said "most" students can't spell/read/be numeric which implied greater than 50% would be fairly useful in both academia and a 'real' job.

            But yeah, I do agree that Uni level education isn't the best. I currently do a mathematics and computer science degree and I honestly think that 90% of the maths I'm taught is wasted (and would be for employers too) and around 20-40% of the computer science I'm taught isn't too useful.

            It's not the best of systems, although I'm not too sure what'd be better (and still cater for the vast majority)
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        • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
          Originally Posted by Jaqs View Post

          School is only one way to get educated. Actually, in my opinion, probably the least amount of education that you'll actually use in the real world.
          There's a big difference between being educated and matriculating from the giant job training program that passes for schooling these days. Some of that education comes from life experience, which, by definition, most teen marketers simply haven't been alive long enough to accumulate.

          There may be more to education than what is taught in most schools, but there is also a heck of a lot more to it than being able to build a website or make money online.

          Originally Posted by Mohammad Afaq View Post

          I am a full time internet marketer.

          Did it hurt my education?

          A little, but guess what? I graduated honors and I am also got a full tuition paid scholarship to college.

          So that proves that being an entrepreneur doesn't hinder your ability to do good in school.
          Wombat Warning: Mohammad, you must have slept through some of your English classes. That should be 'do well in school'... :rolleyes:

          Originally Posted by TheAnnoyingOrange View Post

          Just because you "pissed it away" does not mean that others will. Some teens might be smart enough to invest that money and focus on the long-term rather than short-term monetary gains.
          Even if you are smart enough to invest your money, it's not a guarantee. Ask anyone who has lived through a couple of economic cycles. You can do everything 'right' and still wind up close to broke.

          A good education, with some grounding in economics and history, may help you recognize some of the signs that the cycle is turning. During the last real estate bubble, a lot of young investors lost their shirts because they believed the market would never go anywhere but up. Of course, more than a few older (in age) folks made the same mistake. Others, having lived through boom and bust before, got 'chicken' and pulled in their wings when everyone was screaming for them to fly.

          Originally Posted by DrewClement View Post

          Formal education will make you a living...

          Self-education will make you a fortune...
          Depends on how good your teacher is... See my comments directly above these...

          Originally Posted by Caleb Spilchen View Post

          So, because theres a few not-so-smart kids in the egg basket, why in the world would you say that all students are dumb....

          We were all students once.... It's very UNFAIR for you to judge us, and I don't think you'll make many friends by calling all "students" dumb. That's just my opinion. Feel free to call me dumb to.
          Caleb, you are definitely NOT dumb. But you are making the same dumb mistake that you are calling out - just from the other side of the coin. Just because you, and many of the other young posters here, are bright does not mean you are in the deepest part of the pool. Over the years, I've assisted with classes, done training for companies I've worked for, and just read what passes for writing in a lot places. Trust me, there are more than a few not-so-smart kids out there.

          Actually, many of them never had a chance to be smart. Hard-working parents sat them down in front of the oh-so-aptly named idiot box because they were too tired, too busy, or too lazy to spend quality time. Teachers started being evaluated on how many students passed classes rather than what they learned, and 'grading on the curve' took over. Everybody passed, and got awards, and never got corrected, out of fear that doing so might damage little Billy or Suzy's delicate self-esteem.

          There are a terrifyingly large number of people growing up dumber than a box of rocks, and they don't even know it.

          Smart kids like you and some of the other posters give some of us old farts hope...
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  • Profile picture of the author Caleb Spilchen
    Then there's nobody smart in the world, because everyone starts as a student.
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  • Profile picture of the author ClickHere
    I've made good money on the internet when i were a teen in the 90s with different projects, i could figure the internet marketing of that time by myself, also had some hacking skills which helps a lot .Teens are usually excited , focused and active on their projects even if they are not thinking about money, i was not focused on money(it was a mistake), that's how i was.You get old, and you start thinking negatively or just thinking too much instead of taking action, also you start getting lazy...

    On the other hand, if i had the business(not marketing) knowledgement and focus for money i have today i would have made a lot more money and would be making until today with at least one of the pojects.
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  • Profile picture of the author Caleb Spilchen
    @connorbringgas, anything is possible.
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  • Profile picture of the author gsuccess
    I admire them a lot, I think it is a wonderful idea for teens to occupy their time with money making ventures, that way they could build an empire before they get old.

    At the same time, they have to be careful not to be carried away with their success, that could result in them loosing all the money or even get into a more serious predicament.
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  • Profile picture of the author Edwin Torres
    I for one am a teen marketer and i feel there should be more of them
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  • Profile picture of the author danicat
    Teen marketers suck. I hates them all!

    No, I'm not serious! I turned 30 this year so I'm old and bitter

    Seriously though, I think its great! When I was 13 I was more worried about scamming free aol as it was hourly back then and i wanted to chat with friends. Theres so much opportunity nite that i applaud them for what they are out there doing!



    Originally Posted by Daniel Brock View Post

    How goes it Warriors?

    I thought this would make for an interesting debate.

    What do you all think about teen marketers?

    Particularly the ones in the 13-17 year range...

    The reason I ask, is because I was reading a thread about some 16 year old who was supposedly making millions of dollars online.

    It seemed that everyone was either a bit jealous, or at least a bit skeptical.

    Being skeptical is OK, but a lot of people were trying to put the person down because of their age.

    'I don't believe it because kids that age are too busy worrying about other non important stuff'

    Is it really that hard to believe that young kids these days can make a killing online?

    What about that one 14 year old girl who made a million+ off those myspace layouts?

    I mean certainly it is possible, and I speak from experience here.

    When I was 16 I started a web hosting company and by the time I was 18 I did nearly $200,000 in business.

    Now for web hosting, I can see the potential problem of a 16 year old running it. You know, people have their businesses running off the servers, the host could lose interest and run, etc.

    But we're talking selling ebooks, digital goods, and affiliate commissions here...

    Not so much that can go wrong there.

    I just don't understand what all the fuss is about...

    Shouldn't we be applauding these kids for doing something that most people never even attempt?

    What are your thoughts?

    -Dan Brock
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  • Profile picture of the author tpw
    Originally Posted by Daniel Brock View Post

    What do you all think about teen marketers?

    Particularly the ones in the 13-17 year range...

    The reason I ask, is because I was reading a thread about some 16 year old who was supposedly making millions of dollars online.

    It seemed that everyone was either a bit jealous, or at least a bit skeptical.

    Dan: First off congratulations for having one of those threads with evergreen value that gets resurrected 4 months after its start...

    Second: I am neither jealous or skeptical of kids who are making money online.

    Third: If there are any kids about right now that I would think of as a nuisance, it would probably be you...






    ROFLMAO

    Just kidding.
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  • Profile picture of the author Josh Richardson
    The Young Entrepreneurs Are The FUTURE Of Business. Big Props To Them If They Stick At It!
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  • I think it is fantastic. So many people try and give up. If someone is willing to keep on keeping on good for them. I don't care how old they are. Rather they be trying to make money online that getting into trouble. It is a great way for them to learn and earn at the same time. I wish I started doing this in my teens.
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    • Profile picture of the author Bill Eliott
      Wasn't so long ago a fella had a sharpened stick , [maybe a fire hardened tip to make 'er last better] , a home 'corker of a sling shot , couple 'a buddies and a Fort .
      A long hot summer ahead , nuthin' but open skies , time to cut some grass , make a few bucks for spendin' and takin' out Mary Lou to a fightin' dance or groping drive -in Movie.

      Where'd it go[?] , and it ain't never coming back .

      A moment of Silence please .
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  • Profile picture of the author VinNeil
    If they're good enough, they're old enough. Ideas and results speak for themselves...
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    • Profile picture of the author celente
      Originally Posted by VinNeil View Post

      If they're good enough, they're old enough. Ideas and results speak for themselves...
      I once saw a 21 y.o. so called guru in the self help niche. I thought what a crook, what a thieving bugger. and maybe a scammer.

      but then never a judge a book by its cover....why?

      when I read one of his books and free videos online, it was insanely good!!. And you could tell that he is smart for his age, mature and really wants to help his clients.

      I guess people take age for granted, and older people think they know more. I think so, but some are smarter than others. Take for example genious kids who finish uni at the age of 14 and so.

      Just something to think about. Good post by the way.
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      • Profile picture of the author nucleus
        I'm afraid that they will turn into deadbeat affiliates...

        You know, sleep on the couch in their clothes, get up after 3pm, then get up and play video games, not even open their laptop until six, then head out to the bars and come back at 3am with crappy fast food and then fall asleep on the couch to repeat the cycle again.

        : )

        Nucleus
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Ten
    more power to em. that's great. they have to be pretty bright to be successful like that!
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  • Profile picture of the author tpw
    Gotta be careful though.

    When we heap mounds of praise on them, some have a tendency to let it go to their heads.

    All we really wanted to do was to encourage them to greater things...

    But in the end, all we did was to create little monsters...

    And we can understand how they become little monsters, because we were once teenagers too.

    So please fellow adults...

    Encourage them, without feeding their egos...

    Encouragement is good...

    Heaps of praise create little monsters who will rub our noses in the praise we fed them.

    So be safe out there.
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    • Profile picture of the author DireStraits
      Originally Posted by tpw View Post

      Gotta be careful though.

      When we heap mounds of praise on them, some have a tendency to let it go to their heads.

      All we really wanted to do was to encourage them to greater things...

      But in the end, all we did was to create little monsters...

      And we can understand how they become little monsters, because we were once teenagers too.

      So please fellow adults...

      Encourage them, without feeding their egos...

      Encouragement is good...

      Heaps of praise create little monsters who will rub our noses in the praise we fed them.

      So be safe out there.
      This is so true.

      I started a business when I was quite young (~15 years of age?), and all too often, when people grilled me about my practices and professionalism (which I happened to take very seriously), a lot of people (adults, no less) would voice up in my defence: "Give him a break - he's 15 ... I bet you weren't as successful as him when you were 15", or "Ease off - he's doing his best, he's got plenty of time to grow", were all things I heard.

      This is definitely not such a common attitude to adopt when observing or critiquing the practises or efforts of adult businesspersons.

      And whilst I was obviously grateful for the support of others', I couldn't deny that it almost felt like I was being encouraged to lower my concern for my own self-image and professionalism.

      I expect the "flattery" and overt cushioning that I and other young individuals experience in business could just as easily go to adults' heads, if they were also to encounter it, however.

      And it doesn't happen for them, obviously, because second-rate service, poor practises and unprofessionalism are not acceptable. Neither should it be expected, or accepted, of young people who choose to go into business.

      "Grow up or get out" is my philosophy - harsh as it sounds.
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      • Profile picture of the author paulie888
        Originally Posted by DireStraits View Post

        This is so true.

        I started a business when I was quite young (~15 years of age?), and all too often, when people grilled me about my practices and professionalism (which I happened to take very seriously), a lot of people (adults, no less) would voice up in my defence: "Give him a break - he's 15 ... I bet you weren't as successful as him when you were 15", or "Ease off - he's doing his best, he's got plenty of time to grow", where all things I heard.

        This is definitely not such a common attitude to adopt when observing or critiquing the practises or efforts of adult businesspersons.

        And whilst I was obviously grateful for the support of others', I couldn't deny that it almost felt like I was being encouraged to lower my concern for my own self-image and professionalism.

        I expect the "flattery" and overt cushioning that I and other young individuals experience in business could just as easily go to adults' heads, if they were also to encounter it, however.

        And it doesn't happen for them, obviously, because second-rate service, poor practises and unprofessionalism are not acceptable. Neither should it be expected, or accepted, of young people who choose to go into business.

        "Grow up or get out" is my philosophy - harsh as it sounds.
        As Bill has mentioned, you want to walk a fine line between encouraging them in their early efforts at internet marketing, and feeding their egos too much with resultant disastrous consequences.

        This may be a very polarizing issue that many of us feel strongly about, and it's definitely hard to remain neutral on the subject. As I've mentioned above, ideally we'd want to nurture the skills and talents of these teens, but not cut them so much slack and spoil them rotten.

        It is my personal opinion, just like Caliban had stated earlier, that we should glean what we can from their unique perspectives on IM (because they can definitely show us different/fresh ways of looking at things), and also try to gently rebuke them when we clearly see them heading in the wrong direction.

        Paul
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    • Profile picture of the author Owen Smith
      Originally Posted by tpw View Post

      Gotta be careful though.

      When we heap mounds of praise on them, some have a tendency to let it go to their heads.

      All we really wanted to do was to encourage them to greater things...

      But in the end, all we did was to create little monsters...

      And we can understand how they become little monsters, because we were once teenagers too.

      So please fellow adults...

      Encourage them, without feeding their egos...

      Encouragement is good...

      Heaps of praise create little monsters who will rub our noses in the praise we fed them.

      So be safe out there.
      I don't really agree with you on the ego side of things. Money and success can get and does get to many peoples heads, the age barrier makes little difference.

      It all depends on the maturity levels, at the age of 10, I was more mature than some 40 year olds. Everyone is different, everyones maturity levels are different.

      Many 50 year olds are more imature that some 15 year olds.

      Also, think of it this way, the teens who want to progress and make money will be the mature ones, as the others will sit at home drinking, smoking and jobless!

      Regards
      Owen
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      • Profile picture of the author DireStraits
        Originally Posted by Owen Smith View Post

        Also, think of it this way, the teens who want to progress and make money will be the mature ones, as the others will sit at home drinking, smoking and jobless!
        (slightly off-topic)

        LOL, this made me chuckle.

        I drink, smoke and am "jobless" (and pretty much have been since school, with exception to a couple of brief stints a long time ago, due to my parents' once-held and since-rectified disbelief in the potential to earn good money online), and I've made money online all that time.

        Then again, where I come from, smoking and drinking are practically mandatory if you want to survive mentally.
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        • Profile picture of the author Owen Smith
          Originally Posted by DireStraits View Post

          (slightly off-topic)

          LOL, this made me chuckle.

          I drink, smoke and am "jobless" (and pretty much have been since school, with exception to a couple of brief stints a long time ago, due to my parents' once-held and since-rectified disbelief in the potential to earn good money online), and I've made money online all that time.

          Then again, where I come from, smoking and drinking are practically mandatory if you want to survive mentally.
          By jobless, I mean do nothing, I class making money as a job even if I do 'work for myself'
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          • Profile picture of the author DireStraits
            Originally Posted by Owen Smith View Post

            By jobless, I mean do nothing, I class making money as a job even if I do 'work for myself'
            Yeah, I know. I was just kiddin'.

            Though that's how a lot of people (the majority of which are regular employees - and most of whom seem to hate their jobs) seem to look at me.

            To say I've received (and I expect maybe everyone else here has too, at some point, for the same reasons?) some frowns and hostility over it, is quite the understatement.

            (sorry to sidetrack the thread).
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            • Profile picture of the author Owen Smith
              Originally Posted by DireStraits View Post

              Yeah, I know. I was just kiddin'.

              Though that's how a lot of people (the majority of which are regular employees - and most of whom seem to hate their jobs) seem to look at me.

              To say I've received (and I expect maybe everyone else here has too, at some point, for the same reasons?) some frowns and hostility over it, is quite the understatement.

              (sorry to sidetrack the thread).
              I guess you being from the UK also, know how BAD our benefit system is, that Is what I was refering to .

              Regards
              Owen
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              • Profile picture of the author DireStraits
                Originally Posted by Owen Smith View Post

                I guess you being from the UK also, know how BAD our benefit system is, that Is what I was refering to .

                Regards
                Owen
                Hah, yeah.

                And I'm from Hull: one of the worst places for unemployment (particularly among younger people) and benefits dossers/scroungers, I think.
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                • Profile picture of the author Owen Smith
                  Originally Posted by DireStraits View Post

                  Hah, yeah.

                  And I'm from Hull: one of the worst places for unemployment (particularly among younger people) and benefits dossers/scroungers, I think.
                  Im for North wales, I guess the closest location you may no next to me is Rhyl!
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  • Profile picture of the author dagaul101
    jealous or sceptical, the technology is aimed at them, so it should be no surprise a few should sprout up
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  • Profile picture of the author jamjar919
    Its meee...

    At 13, I must admit it's hard to get a good grasp on things, but its very possible to make money. I make money with Wordpress theme sponsorships - A great business and am now marketing with twitter and blogger to boost my earnings.

    The main problem for people my age is that school seems to get in the way of everything. Getting focused is the key - homework comes crushing down so I get that out the way first and then do this.

    I wish they focused on school.

    I don't care if you're a teen millionaire. I don't find it successful.

    I would prefer if you were an educated teen.
    Why? Isn't the whole point of being educated to make a living for yourself in the world?
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    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
      Originally Posted by jamjar919 View Post

      Why? Isn't the whole point of being educated to make a living for yourself in the world?
      It honestly isn't, since you ask. That isn't what education should be about at all (with one or two very limited and specific exceptions like "business schools"). Education is what remains after all the stuff you learned has been forgotten. You're confusing "education" with "qualifications" and they're two very, very different things.
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      • Profile picture of the author DireStraits
        Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

        It honestly isn't, since you ask. That isn't what education should be about at all (with one or two very limited and specific exceptions like "business schools"). Education is what remains after all the stuff you learned has been forgotten. You're confusing "education" with "qualifications" and they're two very, very different things.
        Is that an (indirect) Einstein quote?

        Hmmm. I sort of understand the point, but at the same time, I'm not so sure it really rings so true ... certainly not all of the time.

        If you can so easily lose the skills and knowledge you learn (on a specific subject, or in a specific field, for instance), isn't it just as easy to forget and lose whatever traits or wisdom your education might've taught you or instilled within you?

        Though life is a long, never-ending educational experience (or should be, I think), so unless you're just going to sit on your rear and become a dsyfunctional, XFactor-watching couch potato (and barring certain degenerative illnesses), I agree that you're probably not going to go downhill over time - and a real, formal education can set you up good and well (and perhaps better).
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      • Profile picture of the author olix1
        Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

        It honestly isn't, since you ask. That isn't what education should be about at all (with one or two very limited and specific exceptions like "business schools"). Education is what remains after all the stuff you learned has been forgotten. You're confusing "education" with "qualifications" and they're two very, very different things.
        I agree but i don't agree I'm 14 and i do pretty good in school and i never get on the computer before i have finished my school. But one of the main reasons in my mind to get good grades is so Im not working at a Mcdonalds flipping burgers. School is out there for you to learn and I learn a lot from it, but you go to school so you can go to collage and then make a life for yourself.
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      • Profile picture of the author Bill Eliott
        Education is what remains after all the stuff you learned has been forgotten.

        Samuel Clemens agreed .


        ''I've never let my school interfere with my education''. Mark Twain.
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        • Profile picture of the author thriftgirl62
          Teach kids to THINK, not listen and then they can figure out WHO and WHAT to listen to and WHY. Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't.

          PARENTS just waste their time spying and trying to keep up with where kids are going (they lie) looking through their rooms, computer files, whatever. BIG waste of time - if you do find something it's too late anyway.

          Here's the solution: Learn how to control who your kids associate with from the time they can walk. Until they learn how to THINK for themselves, you make sure they have good choices and no bad influences. Period.

          There's no excuse for NOT controlling your child's association because children learn what they live and by age 5 it's gets harder and harder to teach them anything different especially if nothing changes.

          Just because you find out something isn't right and stop it immediately that doesn't mean it's okay now. NO, the damage has been done by the time you find out.

          The other thing you have to do is make them think you're crazy. You just might do anything - let them think what you might do is worse than taking the risk because you ARE CRAZY. It works too. If they ever find out you're really not crazy, they understand why you pretended you were - and follow your example...your job is well done when they do that!
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  • Profile picture of the author Owen Smith
    There are pleanty of largely successful teens, I started at the age of 12 and have grown my income into a massive network.

    Motivation grips teens, money is everything when you are a teen. You want want want, if you get, you want more! In a way, this is brilliant, as the work ethic is brilliant for teens who start seeing they are earning money!
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  • Profile picture of the author patadeperro
    Originally Posted by Chris Kent View Post

    I think the other reason for jealousy is that the "system" teaches you to defer your life until retirement
    OMG I never knew I would find people like you around here, there are many good comments, specially those who are talking about how the kids get super indoctrinated in the school system.

    I can see as well how many people in this forum confuse education with information, you can have education ANYWHERE, I have known people who has great education and never went to school, and some other people with PHD degrees that they only have information in their minds, but not educated in any way.

    If this kids are making money online and making mistakes, GREAT, that is part of their education, tell me where are they going to have this awesome experience? I hear some other people that they "should be doing more teenager stuff" or "doing something else like playing, meeting people, etc..", why? what if IM is your real passion? what if you are not really interested on those activities.... I remember a lot an interview some morons made to a 10 year old violin player they ask her "Why are they stealing your childhood?" or some moronic stuff like that... and she just answered: "This is how I want to spend my childhood" BUM!!!!!!

    Congrats to all the teenager internet marketers for braking the indoctrination line.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ofthemix
    I'm jealous. I wish I started when I was that young instead of spending all of my time online playing EverQuest. Oh the time that was lost.
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    • Profile picture of the author Alan Petersen
      Originally Posted by Ofthemix View Post

      I'm jealous. I wish I started when I was that young instead of spending all of my time online playing EverQuest. Oh the time that was lost.
      When I was a teen if I wanted to play video games I had to go outside to an arcade so at least I was getting some fresh air.

      If I had a teenager I would ensure they're outside enjoying their childhood I don't care if they're making $10K a minute online. I would get their ass outside to enjoy life. Plenty of time to make money and get serious.
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      • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
        Originally Posted by eleary View Post

        I think you aren't giving them enough credit! I taught an entrepreneur class to high school kids. You would be completely amazed at the ideas they came up with and the follow through they had.

        Think of the freedom we are after - they already have it - no worries if it doesn't really work. In a way, it may make them better at the game!

        Also, they have gown up with a mouse in their hand. They know computers far better than most of the "experieinced" marketers. It's defnitely to their advantage. Even just a powerpoint - they can create powerpoints at that age that would blow away most I have seen.

        I just read a book called Lessons of a Lipstick Queen - she began her lipstick empire at about 18. She just went for it. As adults, we have a lot more fear of failure.

        Anyway, I think it's awesome! I wish I had started when I was 16. Imagine!
        They may have grown up with a mouse in their hand, and be an absolute whiz with Powerpoint (or other software). That doesn't make them immune from believing they know everything. They simply don't have the life experience to understand some of the psychology, especially some of us older folks.

        There are some things you can only learn by making enough trips around the sun to gain life experience.

        Originally Posted by olix1 View Post

        I agree but i don't agree I'm 14 and i do pretty good in school and i never get on the computer before i have finished my school. But one of the main reasons in my mind to get good grades is so Im not working at a Mcdonalds flipping burgers. School is out there for you to learn and I learn a lot from it, but you go to school so you can go to collage and then make a life for yourself.
        Hate to break it to you, but if you work for Mickey D's and the only thing you learn is how to flip burgers, you've screwed up. Burger flipping, and associated tasks, are just something you need to do to get to the good stuff.

        Like team building, customer service, quality control, inventory control, managing a team. If you pay attention, especially if you work in a franchise and ask good questions, you can learn a lot more. Like how leverage works in a hands-on environment. I've met a few very wealthy franchisees, but none of them owned just one franchise.

        Heck, even if you never get past flipping burgers, it's a lesson in keeping after a task even if it doesn't thrill you in order to reach another goal.
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      • Profile picture of the author paulie888
        Originally Posted by Alan Petersen View Post

        When I was a teen if I wanted to play video games I had to go outside to an arcade so at least I was getting some fresh air.

        If I had a teenager I would ensure they're outside enjoying their childhood I don't care if they're making $10K a minute online. I would get their ass outside to enjoy life. Plenty of time to make money and get serious.
        This same phenomenon occurs with young prodigies in other fields (acting/music/sports) as well, they have to be careful in ensuring they live well-balanced lives that don't just consist of focusing on their chosen field 24/7.

        Paul
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        • Profile picture of the author Apollo77
          I think it's great if anyone can get a financial jump in life. Things are becoming so hard these days and money even tighter. Even with a good education, some people still live in the poor house.

          Life experience is one of the best kinds of education, and the IM world is a great way to meet people, learn new things and make more money than you would in almost any career.

          I am 33 and I get angry at myself thinking about all the years I wasted when I could of been doing this if I had just met the right people or gotten a computer at an earlier age. I come from a very poor family and the IM world has changed my life FOREVER.

          I absolutely applaud anyone at that young of an age for having the right mindset to start their own business and never have to deal with a power hungry boss and jobs that go nowhere. That's obviously not the case for everyone, but these days it's getting pretty bad, less and less people willing to help as everyone is to worried about their own situation.
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          • Profile picture of the author KatyaSenina
            I personally admire those teens and get a tad bit jealous at times when I hear amazing stories of teens who made it big at a very young age. I think it's more regret rather than jealousy knowing that I could be at a very different place in my life right now if I did things differently and applied myself much, much, much earlier.

            I'm 24 and still have all the time in the world but I do have responsibilities as well and bills to pay. Things are harder. If I started earlier I wouldn't have all these worries.

            There is one thing that disgusts me though when I look at people my age in my environment. All they think about is partying and most are so shallow minded. They move through life without goals thinking life is a party until reality hits them in the face. Most are broke as h*ll, work parttime jobs that underpay them and study to become a corporate slave someday and live on fixed salaries.

            Though I myself still work an exhausting day job and am still a newbie when it comes to IM that's not a position I want to be in for the rest of my life and I don't wish for anyone else to be in it.

            Also I believe you can't start early enough with making money. Once I dropped out of college 6 years ago I thought my life would be awesome and easy. I thought I would earn all the money I want but instead reality was more harsher. I had to get a crappy, fulltime job and work myself to exhaustion just to get by on an ongoing basis.
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            • Profile picture of the author Apollo77
              There is one thing that disgusts me though when I look at people my age in my environment. All they think about is partying and most are so shallow minded. They move through life without goals thinking life is a party until reality hits them in the face. Most are broke as h*ll, work parttime jobs that underpay them and study to become a corporate slave someday and live on fixed salaries.
              That was me. I'm not going to blame it all on my up bringing cause I made my own decisions. But partly because of my home life and the types of people my family was associated with I ended up having a drug problem for years and I really hate myself for that. I was lazy, resentful and very rebellious, I only wish I had a mentor or someone who could of kicked me in the ass at an early age and shown me the way.

              But the past is the past and I look forward to my very promising future and being able to travel the world which is one of my biggest dreams.

              GOOD LUCK to all young'ins! I sincerely wish you the best and hope you make the most of this opportunity
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              • Profile picture of the author KatyaSenina
                Originally Posted by Apollo77 View Post

                That was me. I'm not going to blame it all on my up bringing cause I made my own decisions. But partly because of my home life and the types of people my family was associated with I ended up having a drug problem for years and I really hate myself for that. I was lazy, resentful and very rebellious, I only wish I had a mentor or someone who could of kicked me in the ass at an early age and shown me the way.

                But the past is the past and I look forward to my very promising future and being able to travel the world which is one of my biggest dreams.

                GOOD LUCK to all young'ins! I sincerely wish you the best and hope you make the most of this opportunity
                Hi Apollo, we all go through life making a bunch of mistakes, but that's part of our life journey. I myself have many regrets as well to this day.

                I'm glad all is well now for you and that you've reached a point in life where you've decided to make a change and eventually came out stronger and learned a lesson from it. Some never reach that point in life.
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                • Profile picture of the author abdulquddus
                  We should encourage them. They may do errors, but they learn from them. Now a days most of the companies are looking at young managers. Because they take challenges, if guided correctly they will take profitable challenges.

                  My company is supportive to me. Just seeing my work they double promoted me and I was the youngest leader in company. I take challenges and the senior managers guide me

                  I would surely encourage the teen marketers
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  • Profile picture of the author Devid Farah
    I think we should definitely be applauding these kids for having the drive and putting in the effort to accomplish their goals - even if they may not have a grand vision for their futures, and might think of things "in the now" - why is that a problem?
    They are working hard and living the dream - and I say good for them, especially the ones who continue their education while they do it.
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  • Profile picture of the author JamesW
    I think they're quite cool as long as they're not competing with me in the search engines and outranking me. :-)

    They're also extremely lucky. When I was between the age of 12 and 18 the internet didn't exist, so I could only earn a few pounds by washing a few cars and doing my Gran's shopping for her.
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  • Profile picture of the author Daryl Lim
    This is one controversial and interesting thread.

    As a 15 year old myself, I feel pressurized when i see such successes at my age or even younger than me... Darn, like what in the world am I doing? Why am I not like them? Especially when i have a goal of becoming the richest man in the world. Doubt creeps in sometimes.

    But nevertheless, and on another hand, i do respect these guys.
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    • Profile picture of the author KatyaSenina
      Originally Posted by Daryl Lim View Post

      This is one controversial and interesting thread.

      As a 15 year old myself, I feel pressurized when i see such successes at my age or even younger than me... Darn, like what in the world am I doing? Why am I not like them? Especially when i have a goal of becoming the richest man in the world. Doubt creeps in sometimes.

      But nevertheless, and on another hand, i do respect these guys.
      I feel the very same way. Sometimes it feels like life is passing me by and I feel like I should be at the same level as these kids.
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  • Profile picture of the author Lothar Evers
    In fact I am not jealous. Everybody has to be unique, so why not push you age if you are very young. When it comes to apraisals however: " In this interview she showed me how to add some five figure income to their sales I have to smile and cannot really believe, the the young marketer already earned it...
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  • Profile picture of the author iobeek
    I think it's great to see some young people doing it the RIGHT WAY. No room for jealousy here.

    Hmm.....I think if you make millions by the age of 18 you have to be pretty educated. Even if you make thousands by the age of 18 your are in the top 1% of "educated". Just don't get this one.....if you are so successful in your teen years education is no issue. You will consume knowledge on every corner.

    Originally Posted by Robert Domino View Post

    I wish they focused on school.

    I don't care if you're a teen millionaire. I don't find it successful.

    I would prefer if you were an educated teen.
    Kind of oxymoron right there
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    • Profile picture of the author Apollo77
      Hi Apollo, we all go through life making a bunch of mistakes, but that's part of our life journey. I myself have many regrets as well to this day.

      I'm glad all is well now for you and that you've reached a point in life where you've decided to make a change and eventually came out stronger and learned a lesson from it. Some never reach that point in life.
      Thanks KatyaSenina,

      My brother is 2 years older than me and still acts like he is 18. When I see 40 or 50 year old people still doing the same thing, it makes me shutter and gives me even more motivation, as I do not want to be that person.

      Education is what remains after all the stuff you learned has been forgotten.

      Samuel Clemens agreed .

      ''I've never let my school interfere with my education''. Mark Twain.
      Best quotes in this entire thread!

      Age doesn't matter. In fact, it's a huge motivation for me if I see Internet marketers half my age making more money than I do.
      That's one of the biggest motivators that got me into IM, H*ll, if they can do it, so can I, same with the older and more experienced. Even though most of us know nothing about IM when we first start and some have very little computer skills, You have to look at it like a trade or going to college, it might be hard and might take a year for some people to learn everything, but it is worth it in the end.

      Good things come to those who are patient and willing to work for it.

      Almost 200 replies....
      The Teen IM'ers must be doing something right if they have people talking this much about them.
      No kidding. I think for most of us there is that bit of jealously that we weren't in that position, but kudos to the young ones who won't have to go through what some of us did in the harsh world of 9 to 5.
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  • Profile picture of the author liquidice04
    The problem is that we don't want to take advice from kids. If they were lecturing you on how to fix your love life in real life you would laugh.
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  • Profile picture of the author bethparker
    I think it's great when teens take an interest in something productive rather than spending all of their time playing mindless video games and hanging out with their friends. It's good for them to get some real-life experience before they reach the point in their lives when they have to make money to support themselves. I think the ones we hear about that are incredibly successful are either smarter than average, or luckier than average. Just like there are plenty of adults making very little from their Internet marketing efforts, there are lots of teens who take years to learn how to make money online too.
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