I HATE customers with such reply

42 replies
I offer my SEO services to the warriors here, exclusively, and I know I have some warriors who work with me for a long-term deal.

Then, one of my client wrote to me, asking me if I can give him a special price for bulk order.

Sure, I gave him a price which is a bulk order price.

And here's the reply that pisses me off:
"com'on..at their same prices man

time is changing.. we used to make 1 minute videos at $97 a min, now doing it at 37 a min...


they have offered me to do it at $20 per campaign, if i order 10.

$15 per campaign if i order 20 or more...

i want to do it with you...lets do it at $27 for 1 campaign,...same pricing..


why lose me? just give the same prices...


i'm already ur customer therefore im asking directly"
I know you are a customer, you have to right to shop for the best price.

But to tell a person to "lower your price or lose me as a client" is a direct insult to the seller.

Have you ever ask a surgeon, "Come on, the other surgeon is charge way cheaper than you. Why lose me? Just give me the same price."

For me, I rather lose this client.

Will you do the same thing? Or will you bring yourself down to a low level just to get business?
#customers #hate #reply
  • Profile picture of the author Harvey M
    Be firm. Judging by their English skills, they aren't worth your time anyway...
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    • Profile picture of the author Tina Golden
      Originally Posted by Harvey M View Post

      Be firm. Judging by their English skills, they aren't worth your time anyway...
      What do their English skills have to do with it? This is one of the silliest comments I've seen on here for a while.
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      • Profile picture of the author dbarnum
        I agree on the language skills comment, wow! That's a bit rude there, Harvey M




        On the bartering, accept it as part of business, and get down to the specs, is my humble advice. Maybe you can offer a lower level / tier of service, scaling down some. Sometimes it pays to let customers help you develop new products and services

        Also, someone once told me that if you treat everyone the same, you are mistreating most people. Accept diversity - in race, business dealings, etc. and embrace change.
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    • Profile picture of the author Rod Cortez
      Originally Posted by Joseph Then View Post

      I offer my SEO services to the warriors here, exclusively, and I know I have some warriors who work with me for a long-term deal.

      Then, one of my client wrote to me, asking me if I can give him a special price for bulk order.

      Sure, I gave him a price which is a bulk order price.

      And here's the reply that pisses me off:


      I know you are a customer, you have to right to shop for the best price.

      But to tell a person to "lower your price or lose me as a client" is a direct insult to the seller.

      Have you ever ask a surgeon, "Come on, the other surgeon is charge way cheaper than you. Why lose me? Just give me the same price."

      For me, I rather lose this client.

      Will you do the same thing? Or will you bring yourself down to a low level just to get business?
      There are times to be emotional about your business and there are times to be less emotional or not at all. This isn't one of those times to be pissed off.

      I think this goes to your mindset. Rosetrees brought up an excellent point in that some people view bargaining / negotiating as being rude (it's not, it's the way they might go about that could be), which is making something personal that is not personal.

      You should stay firm, but always behave professionally. Thank them for being a customer and explain that you are already giving them a bulk price, but if they choose to take their business elsewhere, that is certainly their right.

      As long as they aren't making personal attacks on you, it pays in the long run to remain professional and stay firm on your pricing in this case.

      Originally Posted by Harvey M View Post

      Be firm. Judging by their English skills, they aren't worth your time anyway...
      This gets my vote for ignorant-statement-of-the-week. In my travels, networking, business-dealings, etc. I've met some extremely savvy business people who did not have English as their first language.

      I learned a long time ago not to judge people who did not speak my language as a first language. To think otherwise just shows ignorance and a myopic view of the world.

      RoD
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    • Profile picture of the author RyanLester
      Originally Posted by Harvey M View Post

      Be firm. Judging by their English skills, they aren't worth your time anyway...
      Harvey, I find your comment statement extremely prejudice.

      Just because someone's English is a bit poor or below your standard does not mean it's bad business. Look at the richest man in the world: Carlos Slim - he's Mexican, and there are about 3 Indians and 3 Europeans in the Forbes Top 10 List.

      Their English might not be 1st class but they are cashing in big time.

      Let's stop being prejudice and judge people by their ability to do business not by their grammar or language preference.
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      • Profile picture of the author Tadresources
        Originally Posted by RyanLester View Post

        Harvey, I find your comment statement extremely prejudice.

        Just because someone's English is a bit poor or below your standard does not mean it's bad business. Look at the richest man in the world: Carlos Slim - he's Mexican, and there are about 3 Indians and 3 Europeans in the Forbes Top 10 List.

        Their English might not be 1st class but they are cashing in big time.

        Let's stop being prejudice and judge people by their ability to do business not by their grammar or language preference.
        I agree that someone's English proficiency shouldn't be a gauge of their intelligence or business worth, but Carlos Slim speaks excellent English.
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        • Profile picture of the author RyanLester
          Originally Posted by Tadresources View Post

          I agree that someone's English proficiency shouldn't be a gauge of their intelligence or business worth, but Carlos Slim speaks excellent English.
          Yes, he's an excellent speaker of the language, he is well equipped and has many yes of interaction and experience. Did you know he used to be a math teacher?
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    • Profile picture of the author PhilippaWrites
      Originally Posted by Harvey M View Post

      Be firm. Judging by their English skills, they aren't worth your time anyway...
      So if someone isn't a native English speaker they are not worth your time? Wow.
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  • Profile picture of the author rosetrees
    He's entitled to try to negotiate and you're entitled to say no.

    It's odd really, in some countries and cultures bargaining is seen as rude. In some countries and cultures bargaining is normal and you would be seen as just plain daft not to bargain.

    Maybe your customer is just used to negotiating.

    I'm with you though, if you charge what you believe is the right price for your services then just say no. That's what I do.

    As your (ex) customer might find out to his cost, cheapest isn't always best.
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    • Profile picture of the author Tadresources
      Originally Posted by rosetrees View Post

      He's entitled to try to negotiate and you're entitled to say no.

      It's odd really, in some countries and cultures bargaining is seen as rude. In some countries and cultures bargaining is normal and you would be seen as just plain daft not to bargain.

      Maybe your customer is just used to negotiating.

      I'm with you though, if you charge what you believe is the right price for your services then just say no. That's what I do.

      As your (ex) customer might find out to his cost, cheapest isn't always best.
      I don't think the OP's problem was with the bargaining, I think it was with the attitude. What this guy's client did was beyond haggling, it was insulting. Like a petulant child saying "If I don't get my way I won't play with you anymore".

      Don't get me wrong, I haggle all the time. But there is a huge difference between a polite give and take and a demand and a threat. A simple "This is what I'm looking to pay, if you can't do the work for that then I will have to look somewhere else, thanks!" would suffice. Why burn a bridge?

      Actually, same goes for the OP. Just tell the bloke "Sorry, $X is the lowest I will go. If that isn't low enough for your, sorry, and good luck". The guy may very well come back to you when he realizes he's being a cheap fool.
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      • Profile picture of the author NickVCover
        Do not forget that premium products and services demand a premium price for a reason. If your service is just better than the other guy's, then you ought to be charging more. Just be ready to cite examples on why your service is better and why it is worth the premium.
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        • Profile picture of the author Daniel Evans
          I used to have a wealthy well known author as a client.

          Regardless he'd haggle like a madman often through several emails. It would take up most of his day (and mine) to just establish a price.

          Once we'd finalize a price he'd then go onto request I "throw things in" for free if he accepts the already ridiculously low price.

          There is fair bartering but some people just take it to the next level.

          Often people overlook the fact that if they pay good money the worker has a greater incentive to output superior work.


          Daniel
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          • Profile picture of the author Hooker
            I have to say that I haggle for a discount almost everywhere I go, but I do it knowing that the price of most products is inflated like mad. However, services that require time are different. You have to decide how much your TIME is worth, how much you want to make per hour of your TIME, and stick to it.

            People who push you into a ridiculous price will only refer others who want the same thing. Just imagine if all of your clients were like him. I think you are better off teaching this particular guy that what you do is worth more than he is offering. People like this are always a pain in the a$$.
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          • Profile picture of the author Kev Stevenson
            Don't take it personally Joseph.
            Tell him your price, tell him you think you're worth it...

            Originally Posted by Daniel Evans View Post

            I used to have a wealthy well known author as a client.

            Regardless he'd haggle like a madman often through several emails. It would take up most of his day (and mine) to just establish a price....
            I watched a well-known politico haggle for ages to get discount on a 7.99 item.
            Eventually the shop manager relented and gave him 50p off.

            It seemed to me that the need for discount was psychologically driven rather than cost driven (a kind of power-play - somehow important to the guy's self image?)

            K
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            • Profile picture of the author Daniel Evans
              Originally Posted by Kev Stevenson View Post


              I watched a well-known politico haggle for ages to get discount on a 7.99 item.
              Eventually the shop manager relented and gave him 50p off.

              It seemed to me that the need for discount was psychologically driven rather than cost driven (a kind of power-play - somehow important to the guy's self image?)

              K
              You've hit the nail bang on the head.

              It's exactly that.



              Daniel
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  • Profile picture of the author Big Al
    I used to consider requests like this an insult but now I just see them as negotiating.

    We have it all the time in our offline business. When a customer asks for a discount on their monthly bill we try to push for a lump sum upfront for 6-12 months.

    We give up something in return for a commitment from them.
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    • Profile picture of the author Karen Blundell
      Originally Posted by Big Al View Post

      I used to consider requests like this an insult but now I just see them as negotiating.

      We have it all the time in our offline business. When a customer asks for a discount on their monthly bill we try to push for a lump sum upfront for 6-12 months.

      We give up something in return for a commitment from them.
      this is similar to what I've been doing. Sometimes, though, lines are crossed, and when that happens, I just say "no".

      nowadays, it pays to be a bit more flexible, I think.
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  • Profile picture of the author DonDavis
    You're not a surgeon

    I guess it depends on how badly you want the work. If you don't want to do the work at that price, and there is a source for your customer to get it done for that price elsewhere, then he has a choice to make.

    It's not the end of your business right? No big deal. Part of doing business.
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  • Profile picture of the author gentryliving
    There's no problem with negotiating the price. Customers has the right to do that. But customer's being rude is different issue. I am a customer but as much as possible, i don't want to be rude to any seller.
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  • Profile picture of the author Manda
    Like any service provider, you have determine the value of services in the context of the current market. While customer feedback is one important component of this, I don't think you have to react to the comments of one customer.

    This person wants to work with you which makes me wonder why, maybe it is due to your past relationship but if the perceived value of service was the same with cost being the only difference, they probably would have jumped already.
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  • Profile picture of the author GeraldNitram
    You can say no. Well, as the Warriors here have said, they can negotiate with you since they're your customers. Even if they start to become rude in their negotiations, be firm and don't take it too personally. Again, you have the power to say no.
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  • Profile picture of the author mosthost
    Price buyers always buy based on price. Therefore if you cut them a deal once, they'll be back with their hands out over and over again. Most small businesses can't survive by discounting, especially when the 'bulk' orders aren't really that big. I say hold your ground, charge what you need to to make a profit, and the right kind of clients will find you.
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  • Profile picture of the author SeoDemon
    believe me, if he had found a cheaper service, he would have purchased it immediately without contacting u for less price, he's bluffing, ignore him!
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    • Profile picture of the author waken
      Originally Posted by SeoDemon View Post

      believe me, if he had found a cheaper service, he would have purchased it immediately without contacting u for less price, he's bluffing, ignore him!
      Not necessarily. Sometimes, we tend to stick to the same partner because we have been working with them before and know well about their level of service. So, I think it's human nature to just try to nego for a better deal with the current partner.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rukshan
    I don't like to deal with customers like him. I always like to work customer who knows the value of service. More people come == More orders come.
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  • Profile picture of the author Joseph Then
    Thanks for the replies man. I think I'm pissed when he made statement like
    "com'on..at their same prices man

    time is changing.. we used to make 1 minute videos at $97 a min, now doing it at 37 a min...
    "
    The first few sentences, to me, is insulting. Perhaps it's just me. But I do reply nicely to thank him for the business and invite him to take another service which he thinks is cheaper.
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    • Profile picture of the author Rod Cortez
      Originally Posted by Joseph Then View Post

      Thanks for the replies man. I think I'm pissed when he made statement like

      The first few sentences, to me, is insulting. Perhaps it's just me. But I do reply nicely to thank him for the business and invite him to take another service which he thinks is cheaper.
      After re-reading your post and then visualizing myself in a similar situation I can understand how it comes off that way. I'd be a little ticked too. However, that sensation wouldn't last too long since I've got other, happier customers to deal with.

      I have a standard of customers and prospects alike: respect me and I will respect you. If you don't respect me, my team members, or my business, then I will seriously considering firing you as a customer. One of the great benefits of being in business for yourself.

      The person's attitude definitely comes of as immature and unprofessional, but I definitely wouldn't dwell on it.

      RoD
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  • Profile picture of the author Cataclysm1987
    The worst is having these people try and get you as a full time SEO by trying to drag down your prices when your profit margins are already low.

    So, when you make 20-40 percent profit margins on an SEO deal and the guy is hammering you to go from 1k a month down to like, 600, not realizing that you are spending 600 just to keep him ranked.

    It will kill your business, guaranteed.
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    • Profile picture of the author gvsridhar171
      The best way to deal with such customers should be as follows :

      "Well I do appreciate your point. If you want me to reduce it $27, then perhaps my ..... feature of my service may not be available .... Is that fine with you ? "

      What I am trying to say here is if you want the price to be reduced, then you need to compromise on my time and effort due to this compromise, you may lose ......... benefits.

      This is one way of negotiating with such customers. 9 out of 10 customers would not like to compromise on quality and chances are he may finally agree to what you say.

      Please do not take it as an "insult". As everyone pointed out here, customer is the "King" and he can say what he feels like.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kael41
    I see this as a two fold perspective:
    1) the customer has a right to ask for whatever they want. Doesn't mean you as the vendor have to give it to them. Business is about making money and providing x,y,z. If this client won't make you money, or there isn't a derivative value in keeping him (word of mouth, connections), then just move on. It's business
    2) from MY perspective in offering services to many different countries over the past 7 years (I ran Article Authors which was/is a content production house), I found certain cultures in different areas of the world who either expected a certain price or expected you to do a,b,c because of what their expectations were. Nickle and diming exists everywhere, and depending on your service you may be competing against an "seo" company overseas who will do it for peanut shells...not even peanuts, just the shells. I'm like the poster above, I just move on to the next client if I'm getting to much gruff as to price points and then I'm that much more happier.
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  • Profile picture of the author Farish
    Hey anywhere in your conversation with him Joseph, did you tell your client, that you feel that your time has a certain value to it, and that you feel you make a better quality product than your competitors?

    Sometimes just stating that will get the buyer to back off and think about it a little bit. The responses you wish to receive can really depend how your replies are written.
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  • Profile picture of the author MBDirect
    The guy is a jerk. Negotiating is one thing, but he's trying to tell you how to run your business. Even rudely. In my book that's an undesirable customer who will most likely give you trouble and be the high-maintenance type, always demanding more. Entitlement mentality type who thinks he's doing you a big favor. These types always threaten you with fear of loss of their precious business and then never bring you any more.

    He should know that common courtesy will get him more of what he wants than the rude, demanding behavior seen here.

    MBDirect
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  • Profile picture of the author PPC-Coach
    You are far better off just dumping them.

    Tell them you will keep them as a client at the prices they paid before or you will have to ask them to take their business elsewhere as you will not be offering your services for their asking price.

    Firing a client is very empowering.

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  • Profile picture of the author rooze
    'Hate' is a strong word to use, I reserve that for only two people I can think of, past and present.

    As a business owner, there are few things worse than having a client/prospect tell you that they've placed an order elsewhere based on price, without having given you the opportunity to review it with them.
    So in a rather crude way, your client has been very open and clear with you. He's told you what he's willing to pay. The rest is up to you.
    I wish some of my clients were so forthright, instead of just saying 'hey, I've only got $500 to spend', they waste hours of your time 'reviewing the specification' to see where a penny can be saved.
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  • Profile picture of the author zaco
    As rooze said hate is a strong word to use, especially if this person is a customer, I understand that you don't like their way of negotiating the price, its up to you..

    BUT the customer is always looking for a cheaper price, they have the right to look around, this customer said that others are offering it for cheaper price and he/she wanted to see if you can match the price, maybe the quality is not the same but the customer thinks it is the same...at least the customer mentioned that they would like to use your service and asked if you can match the prices..I don't even see that the customer was rude.. I think he tried to do it in a cool way by using c'mon and other words

    Alot of people do this on daily basis, we call the cell phone companies and tell them this company is offering this, I would like to see if you can offer the same or else I will move! its a very common way to use, it has nothing to do with culture, everybody try to matches the price in North America, WE DO IT ON DAILY BASIS.. Walmart/Futureshop.....

    Simply tell them that you cannot provide the service for such a price cuze its a loss for you, the customer will go try something else and if they didn't like it they will come back, it happened with me and I am glad it did, I hired so many writers and they all sucked, they were cheap but the outcome sucks, I decided to go back to a writer here "nellterry" and take her services but she is the best writer I have dealt with....

    Honestly if I was a customer of yours and I saw you posting my message on a forum and saying you hate another customer, I would stop using your services, when a customer sends you an email you should keep it private or at least say the story in your words, not copy paste what they have said.. this is a very bad practice

    For the user "Harvey M" , excuse me but who are you to judge people based on their English skills, can I judge you based on your nickname? or picture?
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  • Profile picture of the author NACAdam
    Yeah that is pretty lame who wants a customer like that ???
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  • Profile picture of the author Easy Cash
    Rank all of your customers as A, B, C, D etc.

    If this was one of your best customers (A) - giving you most of your revenue, paying you quickly and accurately without fuss, easy to deal with etc, etc then treat it as a negotiation tactic.

    If it is one of your worst customers (D) - giving you a job once in a blue moon, always asking for discounts, paying slow, always asking for changes with no additional fees etc etc, then keep your price firm.

    He will get the message.
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  • Profile picture of the author magiclouie
    This is business, plain and simple. Expect lots of customers to do some bargaining with you. Don't take it personally. Be friendly to your customers as much as possible for that is one of the reasons that they will stay to be your regular customers.
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  • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
    Banned
    It's called the art of negotiation. Stick with your price if you want, but hate is a strong word to use for a customer trying to negotiate a better price.
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  • Profile picture of the author jessiepadgal
    Hmm...posting this thread probably made the "lose him?" decision for you.
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  • Profile picture of the author RobStelton
    Originally Posted by Joseph Then View Post


    Will you do the same thing? Or will you bring yourself down to a low level just to get business?
    I would tell him to jog on. Know your worth. If you produce quality and your pricing is reasonable he will still go with you anyway. If not, he's prob not going to be a quality long time customer anyways
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