Should I dump Wordpress and Build A Large Website Using Static HTML?

31 replies
First of all, hello to everyone here in the Warrior Forum. Even though I am a new registered member I have been lurking through this forum for years.

Before I get started, please keep in mind that I currently use Wordpress and I am not suggesting to anybody to stop using it, even though I am considering it.

Please read the entire thread and let me know what you think about the two questions at the end of the thread before responding.

I am very familiar with Wordpress, and I recognize the fact that it is a great way to build a huge website that is updated on a regular basis. At the same time I don't like the unsafe feeling of knowing that it is also a huge target for hackers. I know that there are other CMS that can be used which are less vulnerable than Wordpress but altogether they all seem to have many security issues. I'm not crazy about the fact that they constantly have to be updated to fix security holes. Many have become victims of being hacked, and the fix for their vulnerability was the latest update.

I recognize that there are many different steps that can be taken to make Wordpress more secure , but sometimes I think that it is becoming more of a hassle dealing with Wordpress and other CMS platforms vs building large static html websites the slow and supposedly inconvenient way.

I like the fact that If I need to make a change on all pages of a webiste on the sidebar or other areas, you can do it in a split second with Wordpress and all the convenience that it provides. At the same time I am looking at CMS from a different lens. Especially, if you don't have the technical ability of getting rid of malware easily or whatever the hacker decides to upload to your server. Somebody like myself would probably have to go through the process of searching for someone to hire that is trustworthy to correct or remove these issues which can be very inconvenient.

I'd like to hear your comments about the two questions that I posted below:

Question #1) What do you think is more inconvenient? Going through the process of restoring the damage done to a website using CMS like Wordpress after a nasty hacker attack, or going through the inconvenience of building a LARGE website using static html with software like Dreamweaver, Kompozer,etc?

Question #2) Has anybody here decided to take the route of building large websites, that are updated with new articles on a regular basis using static html with Dreamweaver, Kompozer, or other software instead of CMS platforms?
#build #dump #html #large #static #website #wordpress
  • Profile picture of the author maxibrian
    My site has been hacked too and I started working with Wordpress again and paid for better security.
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    • Profile picture of the author Big Ben
      I actually have never been hacked but I know that it can happen when you least expect it.
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  • Profile picture of the author louie6925
    I use kompozer and if you want to add a new page/article is easy, one you've created it just go to file manager in your cpanel, click on the site your updating and just upload it there! done in seconds!!
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    • Profile picture of the author Big Ben
      Originally Posted by louie6925 View Post

      I use kompozer and if you want to add a new page/article is easy, one you've created it just go to file manager in your cpanel, click on the site your updating and just upload it there! done in seconds!!
      What kind of website are you running? Is it a large website with hundreds of pages?
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  • Profile picture of the author abbesnwk
    Banned
    Hy,

    If your website is updated daily (or often), wordpress cms is the best choice for you.
    A static html site is a bit difficult to update or customize once you built it.

    As maxibrian said, pay for better security
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  • Profile picture of the author Xifos
    I don't know enough about Wordpress security to comment on vulnerability issues. I have used it and I love the power, simplicity and ease of use, but I think I will probably always be a die-hard user of Dreamweaver. Adobe til I die!!!
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  • Profile picture of the author louie6925
    I've got a bout 6 small sites and two larger ones, the largest is 27 pages!
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    • Profile picture of the author fin
      Hackers can hack into government secret computers. If they want to hack into HTML or Wordpress sites I don't think it will be a problem

      Just go with whatever you think is easiest and secure as much as you can, constantly taking back-ups every day.
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      • Profile picture of the author SEOSoftworks
        Originally Posted by fin View Post

        Hackers can hack into government secret computers. If they want to hack into HTML or Wordpress sites I don't think it will be a problem

        Just go with whatever you think is easiest and secure as much as you can, constantly taking back-ups every day.
        my thoughts exactly...work with what you;re comfortable with.

        If they want to get in they will...just don't make it easy.
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  • Profile picture of the author wushumaro
    Yes, being hacked is an issue. There are a few precautions you can take.

    1) I recommend using managewp to ensure you automatically get all updates, etc. This is crucial, especially if you manage a ton of sites. (just google it, it's by Vladimir Kovac who is an amazing wordpress dude)
    2) If you have been hacked, have you tried contacting your host provider? Often times they will help you eliminate all instances of the hack and secure your site.
    3) I would never leave wordpress for a static html/php, unless you were a developer and could manage all that yourself. But, trust me, running your own php/.net site can be a major pain!

    Hope this helps.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark72
    Being hacked is a problem, but I don't think that the solution is to switch to html.

    A static html site is going to be a lot more trouble to keep updating on a regular basis and cannot be quickly an easily customised to your needs like wordpress.

    All you need to do is take extra precautions against the hackers and back up your wp site regularly with something like wptwin.
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  • Profile picture of the author RedShifted
    Stupid question but doesn't a hacker need incentive to hack a website?

    Nothing on my site is that important where I actually believe a hacker would want to break into it. I don't sell products, so they can't steal my paypal info, I do sell a service, but not on the site.

    Therefore I see no reason why a hacker would want to break in. Am I being naive?

    -Red
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    • Profile picture of the author Lloyd Buchinski
      Originally Posted by RedShifted View Post

      Stupid question but doesn't a hacker need incentive to hack a website?

      Nothing on my site is that important where I actually believe a hacker would want to break into it. I don't sell products, so they can't steal my paypal info, I do sell a service, but not on the site.

      Therefore I see no reason why a hacker would want to break in. Am I being naive?
      They don't need a financial incentive. All some of them want is their nick name and maybe their favorite extremist cause, on your site.

      Some of them just want to redirect your traffic. This might be to a foreign site where there is a possibility of profit, or just to a very sleazy porn site for fun.

      None of this stuff has to be rational or to make sense.
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    • Profile picture of the author Karen Blundell
      Originally Posted by RedShifted View Post

      Stupid question but doesn't a hacker need incentive to hack a website?

      Nothing on my site is that important where I actually believe a hacker would want to break into it. I don't sell products, so they can't steal my paypal info, I do sell a service, but not on the site.

      Therefore I see no reason why a hacker would want to break in. Am I being naive?

      -Red
      you're being extremely naive. They do it because they can, or for fun, or whatever.

      I am small potatoes...lots of original content across my few sites...but I got hacked a couple of years ago because I didn't update WordPress right away, and left some old plugins inactive.

      Now I have backups of everything on a external hard-drive, and every time I post content, I use the export tool to export all posts, pages, comments into an xml file, again on my external hard drive.

      I also never listen to those folks who say wait before you upgrade to the latest version of WordPress. I upgrade within a day or 2 of the release, and keep all plugins up to date, and get rid of any I no longer need.

      Incidentally, recently I was able to get rid of a couple of plugins by hard-coding some stuff onto my functions.php page. I have come to believe that if you can eliminate as many plugins as possible, you are hardening your WordPress sites.
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  • Profile picture of the author Paul1234
    I've built large sites (around 1500 - 2000 pages) in static html and used includes to change common items across the site - that was in ancient Web history though, things are a tad easier now
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    • Profile picture of the author Big Ben
      Originally Posted by Paul1234 View Post

      I've built large sites (around 1500 - 2000 pages) in static html and used includes to change common items across the site - that was in ancient Web history though, things are a tad easier now
      Are you still building large sites using static html and if you are what are you referring to when you say things are easier now? Did you swith to CMS platforms or are you using something instead of include files?
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      • Profile picture of the author Paul1234
        Originally Posted by Big Ben View Post

        Are you still building large sites using static html and if you are what are you referring to when you say things are easier now? Did you swith to CMS platforms or are you using something instead of include files?
        If I made sites myself now they would most probably be Wordpress based.
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        Paul Turner

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        • Profile picture of the author Big Ben
          Originally Posted by Paul1234 View Post

          If I made sites myself now they would most probably be Wordpress based.
          Ok, you no longer build them I gotcha.

          Originally Posted by Fin View Post

          Hackers can hack into government secret computers. If they want to hack into HTML or Wordpress sites I don't think it will be a problem

          Just go with whatever you think is easiest and secure as much as you can, constantly taking back-ups every day.
          Good point, I think sometimes I worry too much. I am already backing up everyday but I feel that I need to beef up security.

          Originally Posted by maxibrian View Post

          My site has been hacked too and I started working with Wordpress again and paid for better security.
          Never thought about that. I guess that sounds like something I should research.
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    • Profile picture of the author Mattds
      Originally Posted by Paul1234 View Post

      I've built large sites (around 1500 - 2000 pages) in static html and used includes to change common items across the site - that was in ancient Web history though, things are a tad easier now
      This is still a really great way of making your static website easier to manage. I use php includes all the time, although i can see why wordpress in so popular, (updating and creating sites quickly) I still like to code my websites from the ground up.

      If you are comfortable with wordpress then i would stick with it. If it aint broke don't fix it
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  • Profile picture of the author kingleo101
    Dont dump Wordpress, i've been using it for so many years and i'm happy with it
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  • Profile picture of the author sarkar1990
    If you have a little knowledge of php then you can use create websites with any text based editor.

    You can just update a small php file and content will be changed throughout the website. But if you don't know php, then you will have to update each page separately.
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  • Profile picture of the author Wade32
    I would stay with Wordpress myself
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  • Profile picture of the author Peter C
    I am converting all my old html sites to wordpress sites. It is a hassle to update plain html sites, every new link i add to the sidebar menu, i have to mass replace the html code on all the file. I rather go for wordpress anything rather than plain html site. One more thing great about wordpress are the massive number of plugins which you can use. With static html, you can't do anything. With php sites, u need coding knowledge to add new things.
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  • Profile picture of the author David Keith
    You can use "static" html but with php sections.

    Just rename your pages index.php and then include
    <?php include 'footer.php'; ?>
    at the bottom of each page.

    then if you want to change the footer, just change the footer.php page and it will change for every page on your site.

    The same goes for the side menu bar or header.

    That is a big part of how WP and other cms work. but you can do it manually fairly easily.

    I use a somewhat old school looking cms to manage simple sites.
    Wolf CMS - Open Source Content Management System -

    You just setup what it calls "snippets" that display on each page.

    this cms is not nearly as widely used, so the security concerns are much lower.
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    • Profile picture of the author Lloyd Buchinski
      Originally Posted by Peter C View Post

      With php sites, u need coding knowledge to add new things.
      No you don't. All you need is the .php extension on your pages, and the basic php include, which David supplied.

      Code:
      <?php include 'footer.php'; ?>
      Then you have footer, header, and navigation .php in your files. Any change you make to these files will show up on all the pages that call for includes. Simple and very effective.

      Put that together with css which can also change all your pages, and you have a very complete system. Very happy I've gone with that, but my sites are under 100 pages so far.
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  • Profile picture of the author Palusko
    There are dozens, if not hundreds of CMS options for you. Even if you do not want to use Wordpress, you can always choose other CMS. Working with HTML is always much more painful, not to mention, that typical HTML site is much harder to re-design and scale up (adding features in the future is also much more complex). CMS automates tons of tasks, that you would otherwise have to waste a lot of time on. If you are planning on regular updates, you should have a CMS in place.
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    • Profile picture of the author Dan Curtis
      I like to use HTML for my site. I have over 300 key pages plus 500 pages of reader contributions.

      I use includes liberally. Everything but the content is in includes. So if I want to change the nav bar, footer links, article links in the right column, etc., I just change one file and it updates all the pages on my site.

      I never enjoyed working with WordPress. It seemed like there were always problems with nav bars that didn't work quite right, code changes that broke the entire site, plugins that wouldn't work and the very difficult documentation at WordPress.org.
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      • Profile picture of the author Big Ben
        Originally Posted by Dan Curtis View Post

        I like to use HTML for my site. I have over 300 key pages plus 500 pages of reader contributions.

        I use includes liberally. Everything but the content is in includes. So if I want to change the nav bar, footer links, article links in the right column, etc., I just change one file and it updates all the pages on my site.

        I never enjoyed working with WordPress. It seemed like there were always problems with nav bars that didn't work quite right, code changes that broke the entire site, plugins that wouldn't work and the very difficult documentation at WordPress.org.
        Interesting. I am going to look into using includes. This looks like something that I would feel very comfortable using.

        Great point of views and suggestions from everyone. Just what I was looking for.
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  • Profile picture of the author azmanar
    Hi,

    Today, I just migrated my last HTML site to WordPress. It had only about 50 pages or so and I used php include for side bars, footer and header as well as css for global consistency.

    There are tools out there making building html/php sites easier. Less spoken about in WF is SERIF WebPlus.

    If I have to go back to HTML & PHP, I don't mind to because of familiarity. The plus points for html sites are speed, security and SERPs. WP can't match this.

    Right now I've no choice but to adopt WP to ease the management of several sites, gain more site back-end features and my plans for mobile device deliveries.

    For WP security, it is a matter of having regular backups, being aware of the latest threats and preventive measures.
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  • Profile picture of the author Igal Zeifman
    Well,
    Using "PHP Include" to make you static html site more manageable is one way to go.

    Another thing I can suggest is using this OS CMS:
    Get-Simple.Info

    It basically dose the same thing as PHP Include (builds static html based sites with site-wide changes via simple PHP).
    I used it a little myself, but few of my other SEO friend had only good things to say about it...

    Anyway, just having a HTML based site will not make you hack-proof (i.e. code injections can come from HTML Forms) and it will not protect you from DDos (tho it will offer protection against application DoS).

    Did you look into 3rd party "plug-and-play" Cloud-based security solution.
    For few dozen bucks a month today you can get 1st grade PCI DDS compliant Cloud WAF & other acceleration and security features and stick with WP, which is (in my opinion) a great CMS platform.
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  • Profile picture of the author TomBuck
    If I knew HTML I probably still wouldn't use it, because wordpress will always just be a lot quicker to use.
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