Aussies and Brits- What Do You Call a Lawyer?

54 replies
Hi. I'm in the process of making some videos about different Lawyer niches and I want to have voices overs for the British and Australian markets as well as the U.S. I'm just not sure how the titles transfer over. Any help would be appreciated.
Here is the list:

What do you call these lawyers

DUI attorney
Divorce attorney
Real Estate attorney
Bankruptcy attorney
Personal Injury attorney
Immigration attorney
Tax attorney

Thanks,
Bob
#aussies #brits #call #lawyer
  • Profile picture of the author MrMonetize
    It's Solicitor or Barrister here in the UK for the term Lawyer.

    I believe these are right.

    DUI??
    Divorce Solicitor
    Conveyancing Solicitor
    Bankruptcy / Insolvency Solicitor
    Personal Injury Solicitor
    Immigration Solicitor
    Tax Solicitor
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  • Profile picture of the author Marcus C
    We would call an attorney a solicitor. Solicitors can act directly on behalf of their clients whereas barristers are usually hired by solicitors to act as courtroom advocates for the client.

    - Marcus
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  • Profile picture of the author Horny Devil
    Banned
    Originally Posted by bobsalong View Post

    Aussies and Brits- What Do You Call a Lawyer?
    A crook or a thief. Take your pick.
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    • Profile picture of the author bobsalong
      Originally Posted by MartinPlatt View Post

      Mate, we know what you mean!!

      May want to add solicitor to the list.

      By the way, I'm a dual citizen of the two countries you just mentioned.
      Solicitor looks like the right term.

      Originally Posted by Horny Devil View Post

      A crook or a thief. Take your pick.
      Appreciate the humor.
      Bob
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    • Profile picture of the author BackLinkiT
      Originally Posted by Horny Devil View Post

      A crook or a thief. Take your pick.
      There's always one isn't there :rolleyes:
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      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
        Banned
        Originally Posted by BackLinkiT View Post

        There's always one isn't there :rolleyes:
        Often more than one, to be honest. But lawyers perhaps shouldn't be allowed to comment in this thread (otherwise how can we possibly make jokes about you, undisturbed?)! :p
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        • Profile picture of the author BackLinkiT
          You're right. Usually this sort of crass remark just bounces off. Must be on a short fuse this evening!
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      • Profile picture of the author ymest
        Originally Posted by BackLinkiT View Post

        There's always one isn't there :rolleyes:
        Yes, we are...talking from experience..............
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        • Profile picture of the author Feral1
          Originally Posted by ymest View Post

          Yes, we are...talking from experience..............
          Someone mention some of our current Australian politicians?
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  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    Originally Posted by bobsalong View Post

    What do you call these lawyers

    DUI attorney
    "DUI" is only "US English". We don't really have a term that's directly equivalent to that. The nearest is probably "motoring lawyer".

    In all the other expressions you've listed, you can just substitute the word "lawyer" for "attorney" (this is for the UK - I'm not commenting on Australian terms at all).

    "Lawyer" used in this context is taken to mean "solicitor" (you'd certainly say "divorce lawyer" rather than "divorce solicitor").

    It's true that barristers are also lawyers, of course, and a barrister who specialises in family law might in that sense arguably be decribed as a "divorce lawyer", too, but even with that slight ambiguity, "divorce lawyer" is still the right term to use, and you'd almost never hear "divorce solicitor". And the same for all the rest on your list.
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    • Profile picture of the author bobsalong
      Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

      "DUI" is only "US English". We don't really have a term that's directly equivalent to that. The nearest is probably "motoring lawyer".

      In all the other expressions you've listed, you can just substitute the word "lawyer" for "attorney" (this is for the UK - I'm not commenting on Australian terms at all).

      "Lawyer" used in this context is taken to mean "solicitor" (but you'd certainly say "divorce lawyer" rather than "divorce solicitor").

      It's true that barristers are also lawyers, of course, and a barrister who specialises in family law might in that sense arguably be decribed as a "divorce lawyer", too, but even with that slight ambiguity, "divorce lawyer" is still the right term to use, and you'd almost never hear "divorce solicitor". And the same for all the rest on your list.
      Thanks for your reply.
      So it sound like if I stick to the term lawyer British people will understand. What is it called if someone is arrested for driving while drunk? A "motoring lawyer" who would represent them?
      Bob
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      • Profile picture of the author bobsalong
        Do any of you Aussies know of a voice over talent? I can't find anyone on Fiverr. Any other place to check online?
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      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
        Banned
        Originally Posted by bobsalong View Post

        So it sound like if I stick to the term lawyer British people will understand. What is it called if someone is arrested for driving while drunk? A "motoring lawyer" who would represent them?
        Yes - the person would (typically) be a solicitor, but colloquially referred to as a "motoring lawyer" rather than as a "motoring solicitor". But if you said "motoring solicitor", even though it's not quite the right idiom, everyone would know that you mean a solicitor who specializes in defending motoring cases in the Magistrates' Courts and Crown Courts.

        Only pop singers and footballers usually employ a barrister to act for them on motoring charges, I think.

        There's a kind of severity-scale for these things, here as anywhere. Here, that can affect the type of court used and the type of lawyer who gets involved. "Drink-driving" (as we call DUI here) is obviously more serious than "careless driving", but not nearly as serious as "causing death by dangerous driving" (which would be tried in a Crown Court, rather than in a Magistrates' Court, and typically defended by a barrister rather than by a solicitor).

        Originally Posted by MrMonetize View Post

        Right, I've never heard of a specialist person to cover that here in the UK.
        This guy, Nick Freeman, is pretty famous for it: the newspapers call him "Mr Loophole": http://www.guardian.co.uk/theguardia...-daughter-help (that particular article happens to be about speeding, but he does a lot of "defending DUI" as well).
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        • Profile picture of the author MrMonetize
          Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

          This guy, Nick Freeman, is pretty famous for it: the newspapers call him "Mr Loophole": Mr Loophole drives home a hard lesson | Law | The Guardian (that particular article happens to be about speeding, but he does a lot of "defending DUI" as well).
          Never heard of him, but I have heard of all the defendants in that article, lol.

          Despite this chap's niche, I have never heard of specialist name for a person that defends the drunkards in the UK, it would just be handled by a normal Solicitor.
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          • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
            Banned
            Originally Posted by MrMonetize View Post

            Despite this chap's niche, I have never heard of specialist name for a person that defends the drunkards in the UK, it would just be handled by a normal Solicitor.
            Yes - I'm sure that's fair. Many larger law-firms will have one partner who usually handles all that work (sometimes to the exclusion of anything else), who'll be their "motoring specialist".
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            • Profile picture of the author MrMonetize
              Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

              who'll be their "motoring specialist".
              That sounds right to me.
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      • Profile picture of the author MartinPlatt
        Originally Posted by bobsalong View Post

        Thanks for your reply.
        So it sound like if I stick to the term lawyer British people will understand. What is it called if someone is arrested for driving while drunk? A "motoring lawyer" who would represent them?
        Bob
        Drink driving, although most people would understand DUI too!
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    • Profile picture of the author Cyberdog1
      Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

      "DUI" is only "US English". We don't really have a term that's directly equivalent to that. The nearest is probably "motoring lawyer".

      In all the other expressions you've listed, you can just substitute the word "lawyer" for "attorney" (this is for the UK - I'm not commenting on Australian terms at all).

      "Lawyer" used in this context is taken to mean "solicitor" (you'd certainly say "divorce lawyer" rather than "divorce solicitor").

      It's true that barristers are also lawyers, of course, and a barrister who specialises in family law might in that sense arguably be decribed as a "divorce lawyer", too, but even with that slight ambiguity, "divorce lawyer" is still the right term to use, and you'd almost never hear "divorce solicitor". And the same for all the rest on your list.
      Sorry Alexa but that's rubbish (are you even in the UK!?)

      British people use the term solicitor in all cases unless Americanisms creep in, then it becomes lawyer and although the terms are interchangeable - you get a solicitor in the UK, not a lawyer.

      Just clearing that up in case people are confused
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      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
        Banned
        Originally Posted by Cyberdog1 View Post

        (are you even in the UK!?)
        Yes (obviously - otherwise I wouldn't be trying to help, here).

        Originally Posted by Cyberdog1 View Post

        British people use the term solicitor in all cases unless Americanisms creep in, then it becomes lawyer and although the terms are interchangeable - you get a solicitor in the UK, not a lawyer.
        I totally disagree with this. The term colloquially used - these days - is "lawyer", which is taken to mean "solicitor" unless specified otherwise. If you listen to a conversation in a pub/bar, for example, between people casually chatting about solicitors, they'll typically use the word "lawyer" to describe them more generically, rather than specifying "solicitor". This is simply factual.
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        • Profile picture of the author Cyberdog1
          Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

          Yes (obviously - otherwise I wouldn't be trying to help, here).



          I totally disagree with this. The term colloquially used is "lawyer", which is taken to mean "solicitor" unless specified otherwise. If you listen to a conversation in a pub/bar, for example, between people casually chatting about solicitors, they'll typically use the word "lawyer" to describe them more generically, rather than specifying "solicitor". This is simply factual.
          Didn't mean any disrespect.

          But I still disagree, have to wonder what pubs you frequent?

          All my life, my family, friends, people I know, refer to the person as a 'Solicitor' - never a lawyer.

          I wonder now if the difference could be where people are based in the UK?

          You never go and get a lawyer, you get a solicitor.

          That's just the way I was brought up and everyone I know refer to them as solicitor's - so, maybe it is different as to where people come from in the UK?
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          • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
            Banned
            Originally Posted by Cyberdog1 View Post

            Didn't mean any disrespect.
            "None taken".

            Originally Posted by Cyberdog1 View Post

            All my life, my family, friends, people I know, refer to the person as a 'Solicitor' - never a lawyer.
            I suspect it's perhaps a recent change, and that 20 years ago the word "solicitor" was used more than "lawyer"? I'll ask my family what they think.

            Originally Posted by Cyberdog1 View Post

            I wonder now if the difference could be where people are based in the UK?
            This I didn't think of, I admit. (I'm in Yorkshire, and have been since 2007).

            Originally Posted by Cyberdog1 View Post

            You never go and get a lawyer, you get a solicitor.
            The question is, perhaps: what do they say on East Enders and Coronation Street - "solicitor" or "lawyer"? Those being the index of "popular culture and usage", I'm told (though I confess I've never seen either).
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            • Profile picture of the author Cyberdog1
              Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post


              The question is, perhaps: what do they say on East Enders and Coronation Street - "solicitor" or "lawyer"? Those being the index of "popular culture and usage", I'm told (though I confess I've never seen either).
              Oh no - do not bring Eastenders into this!!!!!

              I have seen ads on the TV, like 'lawyers4U' but then I've seen ones that mention needing a solicitor for debt management etc etc.

              I think it is varied across the UK.

              At the end of the day, both work, but for the OP - I guess it's what comes out best for search engine rankings.

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            • Profile picture of the author bobsalong
              Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

              Yes - the person would (typically) be a solicitor, but colloquially referred to as a "motoring lawyer" rather than as a "motoring solicitor". But if you said "motoring solicitor", even though it's not quite the right idiom, everyone would know that you mean a solicitor who specializes in defending motoring cases in the Magistrates' Courts and Crown Courts.

              Only pop singers and footballers usually employ a barrister to act for them on motoring charges, I think.

              There's a kind of severity-scale for these things, here as anywhere. Here, that can affect the type of court used and the type of lawyer who gets involved. "Drink-driving" (as we call DUI here) is obviously more serious than "careless driving", but not nearly as serious as "causing death by dangerous driving" (which would be tried in a Crown Court, rather than in a Magistrates' Court, and typically defended by a barrister rather than by a solicitor).



              This guy, Nick Freeman, is pretty famous for it: the newspapers call him "Mr Loophole": Mr Loophole drives home a hard lesson | Law | The Guardian (that particular article happens to be about speeding, but he does a lot of "defending DUI" as well).
              Originally Posted by Cyberdog1 View Post

              Sorry Alexa but that's rubbish (are you even in the UK!?)

              British people use the term solicitor in all cases unless Americanisms creep in, then it becomes lawyer and although the terms are interchangeable - you get a solicitor in the UK, not a lawyer.

              Just clearing that up in case people are confused
              Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

              Yes (obviously - otherwise I wouldn't be trying to help, here).



              I totally disagree with this. The term colloquially used - these days - is "lawyer", which is taken to mean "solicitor" unless specified otherwise. If you listen to a conversation in a pub/bar, for example, between people casually chatting about solicitors, they'll typically use the word "lawyer" to describe them more generically, rather than specifying "solicitor". This is simply factual.
              Originally Posted by MrMonetize View Post

              Never heard of him, but I have heard of all the defendants in that article, lol.

              Despite this chap's niche, I have never heard of specialist name for a person that defends the drunkards in the UK, it would just be handled by a normal Solicitor.
              Originally Posted by Cyberdog1 View Post

              Didn't mean any disrespect.

              But I still disagree, have to wonder what pubs you frequent?

              All my life, my family, friends, people I know, refer to the person as a 'Solicitor' - never a lawyer.

              I wonder now if the difference could be where people are based in the UK?

              You never go and get a lawyer, you get a solicitor.

              That's just the way I was brought up and everyone I know refer to them as solicitor's - so, maybe it is different as to where people come from in the UK?
              Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

              "None taken".



              I suspect it's perhaps a recent change, and that 20 years ago the word "solicitor" was used more than "lawyer"? I'll ask my family what they think.



              This I didn't think of, I admit. (I'm in Yorkshire, and have been since 2007).



              The question is, perhaps: what do they say on East Enders and Coronation Street - "solicitor" or "lawyer"? Those being the index of "popular culture and usage", I'm told (though I confess I've never seen either).
              I'm glad you could work this out. I thought I might have to have an official moderator take you 2 into counseling.

              I gather that "lawyer" and "solicitor" can more or less be interchanged depending on how old you are and where you live.
              Bob
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  • Profile picture of the author MartinPlatt
    Mate, we know what you mean!!

    May want to add solicitor to the list.

    By the way, I'm a dual citizen of the two countries you just mentioned.
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  • Profile picture of the author bobsalong
    Thanks, MrMonetize. DUI stands for Driving Under the Influence (of alcohol).
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    • Profile picture of the author MrMonetize
      Originally Posted by bobsalong View Post

      Thanks, MrMonetize. DUI stands for Driving Under the Influence (of alcohol).
      Right, I've never heard of a specialist person to cover that here in the UK.

      I think a normal Solicitor would handle those cases. I always believed that Lawyer = Solicitor here in the UK as Alexa mentioned, but Lawyer is also used in some cases when referring to UK legal people.

      Have a look at the search volume below which are monthly exact searches on Google UK:

      Divorce Solicitor - 590
      Divorce Lawyer - 720

      Tax Solicitor - 28
      Tax Lawyer - 170

      Conveyancing Solicitor - 880
      Conveyancing Lawyer - 170

      Personal Injury Solicitor - 1600
      Personal Injury Lawyer - 1600

      Bankruptcy Solicitor - 110
      Bankruptcy Lawyer - 91

      Insolvency Solicitor - 110
      Insolvency Lawyer - 170

      Immigration Solicitor - 590
      Immigration Lawyer - 720
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      • Profile picture of the author bobsalong
        Thanks, MrMonetize.
        Bob
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  • Profile picture of the author MrMonetize
    I've got to be honest, I have never used the term Lawyer here in the UK, its always been Solicitor. The search volume I posted above shows that both are searched fairly evenly in the UK tho, so I suppose it depends if you were after the search engine traffic as to what you'd choose. Personally if I was doing any SEO / Marketing for a Law Firm here in the UK, I would use the term Solicitor. Horses for courses..
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  • Profile picture of the author ymest
    A lawyer in England and Wales is someone who doesn't necessarily practice the law! Can be a teacher who's gained a Phd for instance.

    Lawyer is a generic term! Even postgraduates in the UK can be called lawyers to some extent because they hold a BA.

    However, there are two kinds of practicing lawyers so to speak, and this is for England and Wales only. You have the Scottish and the Nothern Ireland jurisdiction which is different, not to mention Jersey, Guernsey and Sarks where they can hold the title of Advocate.

    Lawyers who mainly work in an office in England and Wales are called solicitors. They still can go to Court and defend their clients, but it's considered a waste of time and money since.................those specialized in pleading are the Barristers!

    You don't normally contact a Barrister on your own. You get in touch with a solicitor--who may ask later on, if things get heavy-- to sue, counter-sue etc, in which case, a barrister will be required, especially for high court cases.

    So, as far as England and Wales are concerned, and I think Scotland too, you need to use Solicitor with whatever area of expertise they are dealing with.

    DUI would fall under criminal litigation and not motoring lawyer.

    You can always add, " litigation" in between the word solicitor and the area of expertise. So you'll have insurance litigation solicitor, criminal litigation solicitor, family litigation solicitor etc!

    Hope this makes sense!

    Yoan
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    • Profile picture of the author bobsalong
      Originally Posted by ymest View Post

      A lawyer in England and Wales is someone who doesn't necessarily practice the law! Can be a teacher who's gained a Phd for instance.

      Lawyer is a generic term! Even postgraduates in the UK can be called lawyers to some extent because they hold a BA.

      However, there are two kinds of practicing lawyers so to speak, and this is for England and Wales only. You have the Scottish and the Nothern Ireland jurisdiction which is different, not to mention Jersey, Guernsey and Sarks where they can hold the title of Advocate.

      Lawyers who mainly work in an office in England and Wales are called solicitors. They still can go to Court and defend their clients, but it's considered a waste of time and money since.................those specialized in pleading are the Barristers!

      You don't normally contact a Barrister on your own. You get in touch with a solicitor--who may ask later on, if things get heavy-- to sue, counter-sue etc, in which case, a barrister will be required, especially for high court cases.

      So, as far as England and Wales are concerned, and I think Scotland too, you need to use Solicitor with whatever area of expertise they are dealing with.

      DUI would fall under criminal litigation and not motoring lawyer.

      You can always add, " litigation" in between the word solicitor and the area of expertise. So you'll have insurance litigation solicitor, criminal litigation solicitor, family litigation solicitor etc!

      Hope this makes sense!

      Yoan
      Thanks, that is helpful.
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  • Profile picture of the author ymest
    DUI lawyer will most probably change into a "LOHAN LAWYER" at some point by the way! She's got so many DUI-related mugshots....they'll have to change it!!! Honestly! : Quite impressive! And, still she gets away with it!!! :
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    • Profile picture of the author robg1
      If you come from the 'east end of London' a lawyer is sometimes referred to as a Tom Sawyer.
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  • Profile picture of the author sal64
    we call them used car salesmen with a diploma... plus a few other unmetionable names on here.

    Sal
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  • Profile picture of the author rosetrees
    You certainly opened a can of worms with that question, didn't you?

    I would say that people would certainly search for injury "lawyers", divorce "lawyers" etc, as well as solicitors. Why? Because of TV ads - one well known one is for a company called "injury lawyers 4 u"

    Whether the term "lawyer" has any real meaning is irrelevant. Most people have scant knowledge of the law. MrMonetize produced the Google UK search figures which appear to show that people search for solicitors and lawyers in fairly equal numbers.

    The main point is that we don't use the term "attorney" either in England/Wales or in Scotland. Scotland has a different legal system from that used in England and Wales.
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    • Profile picture of the author MrMonetize
      Originally Posted by rosetrees View Post

      I would say that people would certainly search for injury "lawyers", divorce "lawyers" etc, as well as solicitors. Why? Because of TV ads - one well known one is for a company called "injury lawyers 4 u"
      That's a good point. It's simply a marketing strategy from them I'd say. The term 'Lawyer' is an Americanism, and considering the amount of tripe they send our way via the TV, perhaps that company with its huge TV advertising decided that the audience would resonate more with the word 'Lawyer'? Wild guess, maybe way off. Perhaps its because it sounds better..

      I certainly haven't used the word Lawyer in my life, I would always use Solicitor as a Brit. Those Google stats I posted seem to prove me wrong, so it might be a locality thing. Or a generation thing even.
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    • Profile picture of the author bobsalong
      Originally Posted by rosetrees View Post

      You certainly opened a can of worms with that question, didn't you?

      I would say that people would certainly search for injury "lawyers", divorce "lawyers" etc, as well as solicitors. Why? Because of TV ads - one well known one is for a company called "injury lawyers 4 u"

      Whether the term "lawyer" has any real meaning is irrelevant. Most people have scant knowledge of the law. MrMonetize produced the Google UK search figures which appear to show that people search for solicitors and lawyers in fairly equal numbers.

      The main point is that we don't use the term "attorney" either in England/Wales or in Scotland. Scotland has a different legal system from that used in England and Wales.
      Thanks, Carol.
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      • Profile picture of the author danstairs
        What would you call a lawyer/solicitor/barrister at the bottom of the ocean? A start

        Sorry for the crassness.
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  • Profile picture of the author hardraysnight
    i recently changed legal consultants when they started advertising themselves as lawyers

    i called them and told them why, then went to see another barrister and solicitor, who is now my legal consultant
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  • Profile picture of the author mikeink
    Call them a legal begal or whatever.

    The one at the bottom of the ocean well I guess they may be a boat anchor. The mob throw aways.

    As long as they do their JOB, you may call them ????????????????????????.
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    Well let me see. OH yea need to start work on my ???????? again.
    Been working for slave wages to long.

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  • Profile picture of the author laurencewins
    100 lawyers at the bottom of the ocean is a good start.
    What's the difference between a shark and a lawyer? The shark knows when to let go.

    I can tell you a true story. A lawyer has told a good friend of mine to plead guilty to a charge that he is innocent of because.......it will be cheaper? WTF???
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    • Profile picture of the author bobsalong
      Originally Posted by laurencewins View Post

      100 lawyers at the bottom of the ocean is a good start.
      What's the difference between a shark and a lawyer? The shark knows when to let go.

      I can tell you a true story. A lawyer has told a good friend of mine to plead guilty to a charge that he is innocent of because.......it will be cheaper? WTF???
      Wow! who knew I'd get such an education.

      Laurence-So using the term lawyer would be acceptable to an Australian market? How about a British bloke doing a voice over for the Aussie market? I can't seem to find any Australian voice over talent.
      Bob
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      • Profile picture of the author PaulBaker
        Originally Posted by bobsalong View Post

        How about a British bloke doing a voice over for the Aussie market? I can't seem to find any Australian voice over talent.
        Bob
        A kiwi might be better, most of us find them pretty amusing.
        So using the term lawyer would be acceptable to an Australian market?
        You can use Lawyers or Solicitors if your talking to the general public. Of course most of us convicts use stronger language.
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  • Profile picture of the author Tim3
    Wow! 41 posts and nobody from the UK mentioned 'Brief' i.e. "I'm going to call my brief"

    It's true we mostly say solicitor though, far more often than lawyer, having said that if talking about a business say we would we might be more likely to say "company lawyers".

    As usual nothing is straightforward in English
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    • Profile picture of the author bobsalong
      Originally Posted by Tim3 View Post

      Wow! 41 posts and nobody from the UK mentioned 'Brief' i.e. "I'm going to call my brief"

      It's true we mostly say solicitor though, far more often than lawyer, having said that if talking about a business say we would we might be more likely to say "company lawyers".

      As usual nothing is straightforward in English
      Thanks Tim.
      Bob
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  • Profile picture of the author Bob Ford
    Talk about a loaded question ...
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  • Profile picture of the author thester
    Brits use both terms, although solicitor is used a lot more often than lawyer in the UK.

    The simple way of looking at it is that the generic term is lawyer, and solicitors and barristers are types of lawyer. Attorney is American English word for a British English lawyer.
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    • Profile picture of the author Mark Andrews
      Banned
      Some of you must live in very strange parts of the UK.

      For the purposes of the law as it refers to England & Wales, you would use the term solicitor. Not lawyer.

      Lawyer is simply an Americanism which in the past few years has crept in. But it's not and hopefully never will be accepted into mainstream speech here.

      One TV advert (InjuryLawyers4U) does not in any way mean the word lawyer is a widely accepted term in this country. It is in fact, to 99% of us, a completely foreign word with very little meaning here.

      For example, you never ever hear anyone say, "I'm going to contact my lawyer/s." It simply never happens. Fact. Period. No argument about it.

      Everyone would normally say, "I'm going to contact my solicitor/s." This is the term we are most familiar with.

      Everything else is just splitting hairs.


      Mark Andrews
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      • Profile picture of the author bobsalong
        Originally Posted by Mark Andrews View Post

        Some of you must live in very strange parts of the UK.

        For the purposes of the law as it refers to England & Wales, you would use the term solicitor. Not lawyer.

        Lawyer is simply am Americanism which in the past few years has crept in. But it's not and hopefully never will be accepted into mainstream speech here.

        One TV advert (InjuryLawyers4U) does not in any way mean the word lawyer is a widely accepted term in this country. It is in fact, to 99% of us, a completely foreign word with very little meaning here.

        For example, you never ever hear anyone say, "I'm going to contact my lawyer/s." It simply never happens. Fact. Period. No argument about it.

        Everyone would normally say, "I'm going to contact my solicitor/s." This is the term we are most familiar with.

        Everything else is just splitting hairs.


        Mark Andrews
        Solicitor it is.
        Thanks,
        Bob
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        • Profile picture of the author BackLinkiT
          Originally Posted by drunkenmonkey View Post

          Not necessarily, the only instance where "Lawyer" is commonly used in the UK is:

          Personal Injury Lawyer.

          I've never said or heard anyone say: Personal Injury Solicitor.
          Personal Injury Solicitor is a commonly used term in UK.

          So is Personal Injury Lawyer. It's used to cover up the fact that most 'lawyers' dealing with personal injury cases are not actually qualified solicitors at all. Most have no formal qualification whatsoever.
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      • Profile picture of the author danstairs
        Originally Posted by Mark Andrews View Post

        Some of you must live in very strange parts of the UK.

        For the purposes of the law as it refers to England & Wales, you would use the term solicitor. Not lawyer.

        Lawyer is simply am Americanism which in the past few years has crept in. But it's not and hopefully never will be accepted into mainstream speech here.

        One TV advert (InjuryLawyers4U) does not in any way mean the word lawyer is a widely accepted term in this country. It is in fact, to 99% of us, a completely foreign word with very little meaning here.

        For example, you never ever hear anyone say, "I'm going to contact my lawyer/s." It simply never happens. Fact. Period. No argument about it.

        Everyone would normally say, "I'm going to contact my solicitor/s." This is the term we are most familiar with.

        Everything else is just splitting hairs.


        Mark Andrews

        I think Mark has summed this up accurately. I live in what may be thought by some, to be a strange part of the UK, but have never heard anyone use the terms "lawyer or attorney", not ever. Maybe those who think that the terms are now in legitimate usage, live in cities or just watch too much telly. I seem to have the word "brief" used, but perhaps just by wealthy people suing journalists. I get mine from Marks and Spencer.
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        • Profile picture of the author rosetrees
          Originally Posted by danstairs View Post

          I think Mark has summed this up accurately. I live in what may be thought by some, to be a strange part of the UK, but have never heard anyone use the terms "lawyer or attorney", not ever. Maybe those who think that the terms are now in legitimate usage, live in cities or just watch too much telly.
          The "official" term is and always has been solicitor. However, I assumed that the OP was wanting to know the keywords that people would use when doing a Google search.

          MrMonetize produced the Google search figures that show UK searchers use both terms. As I said before, the vast majority of people in the UK are totally ignorant of the law - because it simply isn't taught in schools.

          If you stopped most people on the street they wouldn't be able to tell you the difference between a solicitor, a barrister, a legal executive or anything else connected with the law.
          Originally Posted by danstairs View Post

          I seem to have the word "brief" used, but perhaps just by wealthy people suing journalists. I get mine from Marks and Spencer.
          Lol. Strictly speaking you "brief" a barrister.
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          • Profile picture of the author bobsalong
            Thanks, BackLinkIT, danstairs, rosetrees. I'm still thinking solicitor will cover most of the areas I'm dealing with.
            Bob
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    • Profile picture of the author bobsalong
      Originally Posted by thester View Post

      Brits use both terms, although solicitor is used a lot more often than lawyer in the UK.

      The simple way of looking at it is that the generic term is lawyer, and solicitors and barristers are types of lawyer. Attorney is American English word for a British English lawyer.
      Thanks.
      Bob
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  • Profile picture of the author pleasehelpmeout
    Originally Posted by bobsalong View Post

    Hi. I'm in the process of making some videos about different Lawyer niches and I want to have voices overs for the British and Australian markets as well as the U.S. I'm just not sure how the titles transfer over. Any help would be appreciated.
    Here is the list:

    What do you call these lawyers

    DUI attorney
    Divorce attorney
    Real Estate attorney
    Bankruptcy attorney
    Personal Injury attorney
    Immigration attorney
    Tax attorney

    Thanks,
    Bob

    A parasite.
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