When was "the day the music died?"

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Perhaps I'm showing my age, but I reckon it was about 1980.

Before then, the music scene was full of great music, songs, songwriters.
I'm not just talking pop music, I'm talking:

Pre 1900 - the great composers - Beethoven, Mozart etc
1920-1940 - the classic songwriters, Gershwin, Porter, Rodgers & Hammerstein etc.
- the great crooners, Sinatra, Tony Bennett
The fifties - the rock 'n' roll revolution, Elvis, Buddy etc.
The sixties - the great explosion of singer/songwriters, Bob Dylan, Don McLean, John Denver
- proliferations of great pop groups, The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Bread, The Eagles
The seventies - pure pop, Abba

Of course there were some individual standouts after 1979, but not the vast number of quality acts, who are still remembered after some 40 years.

Who will remember Iggy Azalea after 40 minutes?
I just discovered Iggy on Youtube - wish I hadn't.
  • Profile picture of the author Richard Van
    What about Vanilla Ice? You must have done a little dance to Ice Ice Baby back in the day?
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  • Profile picture of the author rondo
    Originally Posted by peter_act View Post


    Who will remember Iggy Azalea after 40 minutes?
    I just discovered Iggy on Youtube - wish I hadn't.
    Did you know she's from Mullumbimby. Not far from you.


    Andrew
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    • Profile picture of the author peter_act
      Yep, I did know that, Andrew.

      I can't say "Mullumbimby"" without smiling!

      Re-reading my post I realise I left out Queen and Simon and Garfunkel.

      Rolling Stones touring Australia at the moment, performing to sell-out crowds.
      I don't think Iggy will still be pulling them in at 70!
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  • Profile picture of the author Alast
    Sorry, but I think it's unfair to single out one "artist" to justify your inadequacy to appreciate some modern music. I think it's a rather closed minded perception to conclusively make a statement that "music is dead" simply because you don't like some of the things played on the radio (which is fine). I propose you broaden your musical intake and search for things which may not be played on the radio or some other music channel. YouTube would be a good starting point, in my opinion. You can search for covers made by YouTubers, comedic music (I personally recommend Epic Rap Battles of History -- although may not be everyone's cup of tea), or other music in general which doesn't get played on television or through the radio. I can assure you that there are some musical geniuses out there.

    Furthermore, I disagree with the whole premise of music being "dead" even with the "mainstream" music. Adele, Bruno Mars, Michael Jackson, Eminem, Pink, Justin Timberlake and many more have all been making music after the date you proposed - and I think it's insulting to dismiss their music, and essentially compare it with music made by the likes of Iggy Azalea.

    Some people shouldn't be famous, though. We can both agree on that.

    Here's some Mozart for you:


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    • Profile picture of the author Midnight Oil
      According to Don McLean's song "American Pie," it was when Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and J. P. "The Big Bopper" Richardson, died in a plane crash on February 3, 1959.

      The Day the Music Died - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

      ^ Just some trivia for the young'uns.

      I think it's less about the change in the music scene and more about when you start saying, "Damn kids don't know what good music is anymore," or when you start telling your own kids to turn that sh!t down.

      For me, it never really died, but it did go on life support for some years in the late nineties when everything on the radio started sounding like the same dark, depressing crap.

      But that opened back up as the internet grew and it became much easier to explore what was really out there as opposed to the very limited selections stuck in radio rotation hell. Not just new stuff, but a lot of old, obscure stuff also that you would never hear on the radio.

      Being able to pick and choose tunes for ninety-nine cents or so instead of having to pay for an entire album for maybe one or two songs is awesome. Damn kids today just don't know how good they've got it. They'll never understand the heartache and sacrifice of standing in a music store looking at a couple of albums you really want, but only having enough money to buy one.
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      • Profile picture of the author MissTerraK
        Originally Posted by Midnight Oil View Post

        According to Don McLean's song "American Pie," it was when Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and J. P. "The Big Bopper" Richardson, died in a plane crash on February 3, 1959.

        The Day the Music Died - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

        ^ Just some trivia for the young'uns.

        I think it's less about the change in the music scene and more about when you start saying, "Damn kids don't know what good music is anymore," or when you start telling your own kids to turn that sh!t down.

        For me, it never really died, but it did go on life support for some years in the late nineties when everything on the radio started sounding like the same dark, depressing crap.

        But that opened back up as the internet grew and it became much easier to explore what was really out there as opposed to the very limited selections stuck in radio rotation hell. Not just new stuff, but a lot of old, obscure stuff also that you would never hear on the radio.

        Being able to pick and choose tunes for ninety-nine cents or so instead of having to pay for an entire album for maybe one or two songs is awesome. Damn kids today just don't know how good they've got it. They'll never understand the heartache and sacrifice of standing in a music store looking at a couple of albums you really want, but only having enough money to buy one.
        Another bit of little known trivia about American Pie...

        I watched an interview with Don about a year ago on a local news broadcast and he said that he originally wrote the song around how his high school reacted to the tragedy. He attended Grand Rapids high school here in Michigan.

        Anyway, his producer saw that he would have a major hit and asked him to rewrite the song to appeal to a broader, nationwide audience, which he did and changed the title to "American Pie". I can't remember what he originally called it, but do remember that it had Grand Rapids in it.


        Terra
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  • Profile picture of the author Diana Lane
    Maybe it's because I'm British, but eighties music is one of my favourite kinds of music of all, particularly the stuff from the Mod revival era early in the decade - The Beat, The Specials, Bad Manners, Selecter etc.

    Even now most of these have still 'got it about them' and continue to thrive. Rankin' Roger needs a serious attitude adjustment, but Buster Bloodvessel still sounds as good as ever though he's showing his age. I can't comment on what Selecter are like these days because I don't get to see them again until March. As for The Specials, even though they were always my favourite band back in the day, I expected them to have faded a bit when I went to see them in Newport last year. Not a bit of it - it turned out to be the best gig I've ever been to.

    I also liked a lot of the Indie stuff that came out of Manchester in the early nineties - James, Blur, Oasis (and Pulp, who were actually from Sheffield but, well... close enough ). The only one of these I've ever seen live is James - twice. The most recent time was last week, when I actually got to sling an arm round Tim Booth's neck. Present-day me was thinking 'Yeah, big deal', while my inner twenty-five year old was going 'Squeeeee!! Wooohoo!!' all the way home

    The music isn't quite dead yet, you just have to go out and poke its sleeping body. There's no excitedly turning on the radio to see what's new anymore

    I expect it's unfashionable of me to say so and probably makes me sound like a bit of a music snob, but I think that if the music has died then the day it did so was same day that the X-Factor was born. Simon Cowell was holding the blunt instrument that did it in, but he did have accomplices in Stock, Aitken and Waterman, who had already helpfully anaesthetized it for him.

    On the other hand, Buster Bloodvessel fan - music snob? Probably not I can blame Simon Cowell for everything with reckless abandon
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  • Profile picture of the author NeedBucksNow
    I'de say that music has just evolved from where it use to be but I still like to hear old songs every now & then.
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  • Profile picture of the author WalkingCarpet
    Banned
    After The Boss it was downhill all the way.
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  • Profile picture of the author ForumGuru
    Banned
    That day has not come yet and music is not close to being dead. My wife and I are booked into 4 live shows over the next 11 weeks or so. Bush and Theory of a Deadman - 2Cellos - Korn as well as a Korn and Slipnot show. My wife gets to do one extra show as she is also seeing Manheim Steamroller.

    Heck, I really enjoyed the old Dralion score I heard yesterday when I attended the Cirque du Soleil event here in Cedar Rapids. What a great show!

    Music is alive and well!

    Cheers

    -don
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  • Profile picture of the author whateverpedia
    If you think that all that was produced in the 70's was "pure pop - ABBA", then you weren't there. Either that or you had a very narrow range of music that you listened to.

    For me the 70's was -

    Hard rock (which later morphed into Heavy Metal) - Sabbath, Purple, Budgie, Heep, etc..
    Glitter rock - Sweet, Slade, Bowie, Suzi Quatro, etc.
    Prog Rock - ELP, Yes, Genesis, Tull, Crimson, Floyd, etc.
    Punk Rock - Ramones, Pistols, The Clash, The Stranglers, etc.
    New Wave - (crossed over into the 80's) - The Police, etc.
    Then of course there was the pure pop of ABBA, etc..

    And then Disco (vomit).
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  • Profile picture of the author Dan Riffle
    Video killed the radio star...slowly.

    Once MTV got its foothold, image slowly became more important than the music. For me personally, this was the day the music died:

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    • Profile picture of the author Richard Van
      Originally Posted by Dan Riffle View Post

      Video killed the radio star...slowly.

      Once MTV got its foothold, image slowly became more important than the music. For me personally, this was the day the music died:

      Rick Astley - Never Gonna Give You Up - YouTube
      Rick Astley is a Radio host on Magic FM sometimes, which plays quite a lot of older music over here.

      He still sounds like a twonk.

      I'd also place a large bet that you're actually a closet Rick Astley fan and were dancing around your office when you found that video.
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    • Profile picture of the author whateverpedia
      Originally Posted by Dan Riffle View Post

      Video killed the radio star...slowly.

      Once MTV got its foothold, image slowly became more important than the music. For me personally, this was the day the music died:

      Rick Astley - Never Gonna Give You Up - YouTube
      Uh, oh. We've just been Rick-Rolled, or perhaps Rick-Riffled.
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    • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
      Originally Posted by Dan Riffle View Post

      Video killed the radio star...slowly.

      Once MTV got its foothold, image slowly became more important than the music. For me personally, this was the day the music died:
      I think it certainly changed the nature of music. When a band's video started being discussed more than the song, it hastened music's insidious creep into mainstream culture. Nowadays popular music seems to be used mainly as a backdrop for computer games and movie franchises, and merely serves as a prop for lame "talent" shows or expanding the latest celebrity's portfolio. It's not special.

      For someone growing up in the '60s and '70s, music wasn't an adjunct to popular culture. It was everything.


      Frank
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      • Profile picture of the author whateverpedia
        Originally Posted by Frank Donovan View Post

        For someone growing up in the '60s and '70s, music wasn't an adjunct to popular culture. It was everything.
        Zactly. You could tell what type of music someone was into by what they wore. If you liked the same music, chances are you had similar interests in just about everything else.

        Even to this day the people I hang out with most have similar tastes in music to me. Usually the first topic of conversation when we meet up is introducing each other to new bands, latest albums, etc., before we get onto movies, TV, and what's happening in the world.
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    • Profile picture of the author peter_act
      [QUOTE=Dan Riffle;9694801]Video killed the radio star...slowly. Once MTV got its foothold, image slowly became more important than the music. For me personally, this was the day the music died:
      /QUOTE]

      Great comment Dan, I have often wondered why the production of long lasting music died in 1979 - I think you' ve nailed the reason. Image became more important than the singer or the song.

      Incidentally, just to prove I'm not totally biased against anything after 1980, "Never gonna give you up" is one of my favourite songs, and it's from 1987!

      Darn! - I just found out I missed seeing Rick at my local club last Saturday. Never realised he was coming to Oz.
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  • Profile picture of the author HeySal
    Hoohh Hauuuuhhhh

    If you think it's dead - you aren't playing it loud enough.
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    • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
      Originally Posted by HeySal View Post

      Hoohh Hauuuuhhhh

      If you think it's dead - you aren't playing it loud enough.
      What? I could not hear you.

      When I worked at Little Bear, there was a Denver garage band that played there.
      It was just a week day gig to fill space. They thought they were going to hit
      the bigger time and were genuinely super excited about playing at the legendary Bear.

      Their lead guitar player was pushing 70 years and likely near deaf from listening
      to music that was "made loud to be played loud".

      Anyway, they thought they knew what they were doing and ignored the sound man
      who is very sharp, has a degree in sound engineering, and is a darn good guitar player.

      He eventually just gave up on them and turned the sound for the lead guitar off and turned
      the rest of the sound down as low as possible.

      That lead guitar player had his equipment turned all the way up and played so loud
      that he was distorting all over the place and drowning out all the other band members,
      including the female lead singer.

      Dan
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      • Profile picture of the author HeySal
        Originally Posted by bizgrower View Post

        What? I could not hear you.

        When I worked at Little Bear, there was a Denver garage band that played there.
        It was just a week day gig to fill space. They thought they were going to hit
        the bigger time and were genuinely super excited about playing at the legendary Bear.

        Their lead guitar player was pushing 70 years and likely near deaf from listening
        to music that was "made loud to be played loud".

        Anyway, they thought they knew what they were doing and ignored the sound man
        who is very sharp, has a degree in sound engineering, and is a darn good guitar player.

        He eventually just gave up on them and turned the sound for the lead guitar off and turned
        the rest of the sound down as low as possible.

        That lead guitar player had his equipment turned all the way up and played so loud
        that he was distorting all over the place and drowning out all the other band members,
        including the female lead singer.

        Dan
        Well yeah - the louder it is the better the contrast has to be controlled....unless you're just covering "not all that talented" with decibels.
        I was at the Little Bear a few times. I almost remember them. I was told I had a good time. I remember the dinosaur digs in the area better. I was behaved at the diggs
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  • Profile picture of the author Diana Lane
    Yikes! Rick Ghastly! Aaargghh!

    One seventies band that I don't think I've seen get a mention is Sparks. They definitely had a sound all of their own. I didn't discover them until the early eighties, when my boyfriend's brother gave us one of their albums (Propaganda) that he didn't want anymore. We split up eventually, but I made sure I got custody of that album
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  • Profile picture of the author Rick Rodd
    And guess what? Social Media killed the Video Star... so goes on the vicious cycle of the music industry.
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  • Profile picture of the author Richniche
    I think music per se is not dead. What really died is the art of great music. Today, more people want to sing rather than just simply listening to songs.

    Tons of people flock to Britain's Got Talent, X-Factor and the like. But sad to say, only a few winners really know how to compose great songs. So after making one or two hits, they're gone.

    Singers covering songs are also rampant these days, so fans tend to love the singers better than the song. This is why the real art of these great original songs is not being felt anymore.
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