Apple Campus 2 is huge!

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I drove past the construction yesterday and was struck by the shear size of the building.


  • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
    Banned
    It looks more like a space ship than a building.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dennis Gaskill
    It takes a lot of space to store all that data they're collecting on their customers.
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    Just when you think you've got it all figured out, someone changes the rules.

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    • Profile picture of the author TimPhelan
      Originally Posted by Dennis Gaskill View Post

      It takes a lot of space to store all that data they're collecting on their customers.
      I don't mind Apple doing that. Kind of expect it. Now, a Government.... is a bit different.
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      • Wish I could say the same for my hippocampus.

        Gonna have to start callin' myself Diminished Brain Activity Woman.
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      • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
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        Originally Posted by TimPhelan View Post

        I don't mind Apple doing that. Kind of expect it. Now, a Government.... is a bit different.
        It's all the same to me. I don't want any entity gathering data from me without my express permission, particularly machines that I purchase.
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        • Profile picture of the author TimPhelan
          Speaking of data, I just saw this story about how a US magistrate has ordered Apple to build a "backdoor" into encrypted iPhones and Apple opposes doing so:

          "We are challenging the FBI's demands with the deepest respect for American democracy and a love of our country," Cook said in a letter to customers made public early Wednesday morning.

          "While we believe the FBI's intentions are good, it would be wrong for the government to force us to build a backdoor into our products," he continued. "And ultimately, we fear that this demand would undermine the very freedoms and liberty our government is meant to protect."
          Apple opposes U.S. magistrate's order to hack San Bernardino shooter's iPhone - San Jose Mercury News

          Also, Apple's stance on data collection:

          “We honestly just don’t want to know,” said Craig Federighi, Apple’s SVP of software engineering, to roughly 5,000 app developers at the tech giant's Worldwide Developer Conference on Monday.
          “We don’t mine your email, your photos or your contacts in the cloud to learn things,” Federighi said. “All of this is done on device and it stays on device under your control. And if we do have to perform a lookup on your behalf – for instance, for current traffic conditions, it’s anonymous, it’s not associated with your Apple ID, it’s not linked to other Apple services and it’s not shared with third parties. Why would you do that?”
          http://adexchanger.com/mobile/apple-...d-you-do-that/
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          • Profile picture of the author lanfear63
            That's Claude's old school...Opps, my mistake, I was thinking of the Hippo Campus.
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            Feel The Power Of The Mark Side

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          • Originally Posted by TimPhelan View Post

            Speaking of data...
            I am no fan of Apple, but I figure they got this dead right on the denial of backdoor deal.

            (Bear with me, innuendo fans — I am bein' serious here.)

            Thing is, I guess the hooman brain is the ultimate form of encryption — not simply because we can't always get in, but also because we can't always get out.

            So, what is in there?

            All we know is, kissin' has won out over killin' so far.

            Gotta think that is the default settin' — or why spend eons growin' sublime sensitivity in the form of a brain bigger even than a brain bigger even than a chimpanzee's testicle only to destroy it?

            How did alla that synapsy fingertipsy stuff get so reachyouty?

            I do not believe that takin' a hard line on the soft freedoms of the masses advances anythin' other than a generally pointed, yet undeniably specifically tipped, needle.
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            • Profile picture of the author TimPhelan
              Originally Posted by Princess Balestra View Post

              I am no fan of Apple, but I figure they got this dead right on the denial of backdoor deal.
              Apparently the government didn't order Apple to create a backdoor for all iphones, they just wanted help with one owned by a dead terrorist.
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              • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
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                Originally Posted by TimPhelan View Post

                Apparently the government didn't order Apple to create a backdoor for all iphones, they just wanted help with one owned by a dead terrorist.
                Not exactly.

                Isn't the court just talking about this individual phone and bypassing its auto erase?
                Well, they're actually doing both simultaneously. In other words, the FBI has the phone in its possession and they want access to the data, but the phone is designed in such a way so that Apple actually can't get that access. So the implication of the ruling if Apple complies is that going forward, iPhones will need to be designed with this type of access. We understand that Apple has actually cooperated with law enforcement in the investigation right up to this point, where the judge has said in effect: "We now need the backdoor access to the phone," which is not currently part of the phone's design.


                Apple argues that harm will come out of this. What exactly would that be?


                They're just thinking about the hundreds of millions of users and frankly, the implications of a government being able to compel a service provider to design a technology to enable access to personal information. Nobody really disputes that if a company is in possession of evidence, they should, with proper legal authority, turn it over to the government.


                The question is whether companies should be compelled to design their technology for future investigations so that evidence is available, and that's what Apple and other companies have been resisting. And I think they've done this, of course, because the implications for online privacy are staggering, as well as the implications for the policies that might be adopted by countries outside of the U.S. China, for example, I'm sure, would love a similar decryption capability.

                A Privacy Advocate's View Of Ordering Apple To Help Unlock Shooter's iPhone : All Tech Considered : NPR
                What is the government asking for?
                The Federal Bureau of Investigation wants to examine the iPhone used by Syed Farook to determine whether he and his wife, Tashfeen Malik, had planned the shooting directly with the Islamic State. The iPhone, a 5c version of the smartphone that was released in 2013, is locked by a passcode, which the F.B.I. wants Apple to circumvent.Apple would have to build a new version of its iOS smartphone software that allows the F.B.I. to bypass certain restrictions. Apple claims this software can give someone "the potential to unlock any iPhone in someone's physical possession."


                http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/18/te...-fbi.html?_r=0
                Apple notes that in this case the FBI is attempting to mandate creation of a backdoor under the All Writs Act of 1789. The act has been used for years now to justify court orders that are "necessary or appropriate in aid of their respective jurisdictions and agreeable to the usages and principles of law," meaning it's a way to compel aid and cooperation from third parties. Recently it has been used in a few cases related to decrypting smartphones, but not everyone agrees that it can extend to mandating that a company fundamentally undermine its security features.



                In an explainer about the act from 2014, the Electronic Frontier Foundation argued that "the government cannot use an authority like the All Writs Act to force a company to backdoor its product. Compelling a company to re-engineer a product designed to provide robust encryption is the definition of unreasonably burdensome because it undermines the basic purpose of the product."



                Cook wrote that, "If the government can use the All Writs Act to make it easier to unlock your iPhone, it would have the power to reach into anyone's device to capture their data. ... We feel we must speak up in the face of what we see as an overreach by the U.S. government."



                The American Civil Liberties Union said Wednesday that it supports Apple and would help with the legal battle. Staff attorney Alex Abdo said in a statement, "The Constitution does not permit the government to force companies to hack into their customers' devices. Apple is free to offer a phone that stores information securely, and it must remain so if consumers are to retain any control over their private data. The government's request ... risks setting a dangerous precedent."



                Tim Cook says Apple will resist federal order to unlock San Bernardino shooter’s iPhone.
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  • Looks like you jumped to the wrong spot.

    Mebbe u need a hoppo compass.
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  • Profile picture of the author Markte
    It is incredible! S. Jobs had a great idea! I want to get a job right there...
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  • Profile picture of the author alistair
    Here's one we made earlier.



    Seriously though, that looks impressive. What's it for?
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    • Originally Posted by alistair View Post

      Seriously though, that looks impressive. What's it for?
      It is like Pac-Man gonna eat the (preggo) crescent moon.
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      Lightin' fuses is for blowin' stuff togethah.

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  • Profile picture of the author agc
    Oh, Irony. <-- that should be our new national anthem. We can reuse the Oh Canada tune.

    Anyone remember the clipper chip?

    The Battle Over Encryption Backdoors Started in the '90s -- Are We Doomed to Repeat It? &ndash; InsideSources

    Q) Why are the doofuses in government too stoopid to learn from history?
    A) Because if they had a brain, they'd be out making money somewhere.


    Actually, they working furiously to learn from history... just trying to learn the wrong lesson. They're just trying to learn how to get their way this time.
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  • Profile picture of the author agc
    One more on the NSA using zero day exploits and residual effects of the 90's encryption restrictions.

    How 1990s encryption backdoors put today's Internet in jeopardy
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  • Profile picture of the author outlawdawg
    I am also against the collection of personal data by anyone - private business or goverment. I believe that we all have the right to personal privacy.
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    • Profile picture of the author positivenegative
      Originally Posted by outlawdawg View Post

      I am also against the collection of personal data by anyone - private business or goverment. I believe that we all have the right to personal privacy.
      And me. I believe everyone is entitled to privacy and anonymity, Mr Outlaw Dawg.
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      • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
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        Originally Posted by positivenegative View Post

        And me. I believe everyone is entitled to privacy and anonymity, Mr Outlaw Dawg.
        I agree, Mr. Positive Negative
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        • Profile picture of the author positivenegative
          Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

          I agree, Mr. Positive Negative
          You can call me HD. Most of my fiends do.
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          • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
            Banned
            Originally Posted by positivenegative View Post

            You can call me HD. Most of my fiends do.
            Reminded me of a line in a favorite song

            "her name was Magill, but she called herself Lil, but everyone knew her as Nancy"
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            • Profile picture of the author lanfear63
              Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

              Reminded me of a line in a favorite song

              "her name was Magill, but she called herself Lil, but everyone knew her as Nancy"
              "Rocky Racoon, went back to his room, only to find Gideon's Bible"
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              Feel The Power Of The Mark Side

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