Latest Email, Scam....

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These little t*** are getting more and more clever every day, but it is still easy to spot.

First l see this in my hotmail email....

Your account has reached the limit. update your information now !‏
Account has reached its limit? I am lucky to have a few bucks in there?

But l click on it, and see this one...

  • Profile picture of the author Dennis Gaskill
    I get that crap all the time. If you look to see where the link goes, it won't be to paypal.com. Some are clever enough to use sub-domains named paypal.com (and the .com is included in the subdomain name) so people see that and think it's Paypal, but if you drill down to the root domain in the URL you'll find it's something other than Paypal.

    Browsers and email clients will show you where a link goes when you rest your cursor on them if you look in the status bar (that's at the bottom). You should never click links like that in emails because it could take you to a site with a drive-by virus. Chances are this was a phishing attempt, but it could be both. To be safe, I'd run a virus scan if I were you.

    I hope you didn't give them any information.
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  • Profile picture of the author whateverpedia
    Dear Costumer.

    ROFL.
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    • Profile picture of the author Dennis Gaskill
      Originally Posted by whateverpedia View Post

      Dear Costumer.

      ROFL.
      Obviously they're going after the very small niche market of costume designers and vendors. What's so funny? Haven't you heard of niche marketing before?
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      • Profile picture of the author Kay King
        Why did you post this thread twice???
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        • Profile picture of the author lanfear63
          Get them just about every day of the week and have been forever.

          Always fun to read their latest attempt to get the grammar right which is something they never do, those Eastern Europeans.

          Also, Paypal would never, ever have a click here to login button on an email communication.
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    • Originally Posted by whateverpedia View Post

      Dear Costumer.

      ROFL.
      This has gotta be a honey trap rigged by some revenge-crazed supervillain.

      Guess they figure they are gonna hit on the secret alter ego of the caped crusader put 'em in jail -- an' screw 'em good.
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  • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
    Originally Posted by tagiscom View Post

    These little t*** are getting more and more clever every day, but it is still easy to spot.
    I remember hearing an argument that claimed these fraudsters were deliberately using poor English in an attempt to filter out the common sense "marks". The theory goes that if you read the email and then still click through, you'll probably fall for anything.

    Maybe there's something in that. After all, just about all these scam attempts contain basic grammatical errors, yet proofreaders aren't expensive or hard to find.

    .
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    • Profile picture of the author positivenegative
      Originally Posted by Frank Donovan View Post

      I remember hearing an argument that claimed these fraudsters were deliberately using poor English in an attempt to filter out the common sense "marks". The theory goes that if you read the email and then still click through, you'll probably fall for anything.

      Maybe there's something in that. After all, just about all these scam attempts contain basic grammatical errors, yet proofreaders aren't expensive or hard to find.
      I agree, Flank.
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      • I figure they are freudsters tryin' to slip one past us.
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        • Profile picture of the author David Beroff
          Originally Posted by Princess Balestra View Post

          I figure they are freudsters tryin' to slip one past us.
          Where's the "top post this week" button?
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          • Profile picture of the author irawr
            Banned
            You have to be really careful when looking at the domain. I've seen domains like

            hxxp://www.paypal.com.5642313-7897878-3243214-78978987978.i.am.scam.in

            The real domain is "scam.in" anything to the left of it can be anything the owner of that domain wants.

            They've cleaned up the DNS servers pretty well though, I haven't heard of people using completely fake domains in awhile. I do remember some guy was spoofing 666.666.666.666 for years. (as the name, not the ip.) When it resolved, which wasn't very often, it lead to some pretty creepy ass satanic page.
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            • Profile picture of the author tagiscom
              Originally Posted by Dennis Gaskill View Post

              I get that crap all the time. If you look to see where the link goes, it won't be to paypal.com. Some are clever enough to use sub-domains named paypal.com (and the .com is included in the subdomain name) so people see that and think it's Paypal, but if you drill down to the root domain in the URL you'll find it's something other than Paypal.

              Browsers and email clients will show you where a link goes when you rest your cursor on them if you look in the status bar (that's at the bottom). You should never click links like that in emails because it could take you to a site with a drive-by virus. Chances are this was a phishing attempt, but it could be both. To be safe, I'd run a virus scan if I were you.

              I hope you didn't give them any information.
              Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

              Why did you post this thread twice???
              No, no way, and l their PayPal page, (the mods deleted the above example, fair enough, don't want someone clicking on it by accident) looks exactly like the real thing, but it is smaller than the real page, first giveaway.

              And all of the links, produce error messages, except the login ones.

              Yep, fill that one, and by, by bank, CC and Paypal balances!


              And don't worry l was scammed by the best around a while ago, so l can spot the s*** pretty easily now.

              And l wasn't aware that l posted twice, WF has been acting up lately.

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    • Profile picture of the author Dennis Gaskill
      Originally Posted by Frank Donovan View Post

      I remember hearing an argument that claimed these fraudsters were deliberately using poor English in an attempt to filter out the common sense "marks". The theory goes that if you read the email and then still click through, you'll probably fall for anything.

      Maybe there's something in that. After all, just about all these scam attempts contain basic grammatical errors, yet proofreaders aren't expensive or hard to find.

      .
      I've seen that theory before, Frank, but I have my doubts about it. It seems to me that the more people they get into their "scam funnel" the more there will be who keep going. Some pretty smart people have fallen for some pretty dumb things, so why intentionally eliminate potential victims?

      I think it's more likely that a) Some mistakes are made to get past spam filters, and; b) Some scammers really are that poor with English.
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  • Profile picture of the author yukon
    Banned
    the,Punctuation looks.Great
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