Fighting In Public To Increase Traffic

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You ever been forced to choose sides?

It's only hard if you care about both choices.

Feuding friends.

Sibling rivalry.

Valiant contestants.

Sometimes, it's just so hard to choose, right?

The hard part, for me, is when you're trying to reconcile the difference, whatever they might be and it's obviously irreconcilable.

The opposing sides hate each other either because both or one hates the other (for now at least...I dunno, maybe forever).

I don't like that program and I almost never take part in that stuff.

I try my best to look at things objectively.

I even try to empathize with both parties viewpoints, but I do it silently, in my head.

Choosing sides, in this instance is not something I want to do because it doesn't do anything one way or the other for me (nor any of the other folks).

No matter what I choose, someone is going to be left butt hurt, so why bother?

I've fully embraced the axiom: "You can't please everybody, so why not focus on making yourself happy?"

The only time this dilemma becomes easier is when you are dealing with ethical and moral (more moral...that's internal) conundrums.

Why?

That stuff deals with your own personal integrity.

Integrity is your internal compass.

Who you really are.

Integrity is who you are when no one is looking.

If the problem deals with issues of morals and ethics that challenges my viewpoints then, perhaps, it's a no brainer and I'll choose a side, but mostly it doesn't.

Public beefs are entertaining.

Sometimes they're lame, but at the very least they're controversial.

That's why we all watch political debates.

That's why we used to watch Oprah.

That's why boxing and UFC thrive.

They're fun to watch.

The one point I never quite understood, until recently, is the power for the opposing parties involved.

The potential power that can be harnessed is in being visible.

Public fighting does get folks to choose sides.

It does have the power to position.

You can frame yourself as an authority, expert, or at the very least garner some 15 minutes of celebrity fame when you engage in this.

Why is that important?

How is that powerful?

Top of mind awareness.

You stick in people's brains when you engage in some of this stuff.

Depending on how petty or close minded you are, you could totally screw this up and be top of mind for the wrong reason, but if you learn how this works, you will never be at a loss for how to instantly be the goto top of mind person in your space.

So, here's where I'm at with this:

If you're in a fight, and you have, at the very least, some sort of moral justification, have a public fight.


It's no good in private.

Lose or win in private and it's like a tree falling in the forest.

No one cares.

Nothing gained or lost.

An unsolved mystery that nobody gives a shit about.

Instead, do it in public.

It's an insanely easy way to get more traffic.

You'll draw a crowd, rally your supporters, learn who are your haters and your influence will sky rocket.

What do you think?

Do you agree or would you rather argue with me about it?

Regards,

Los

#fighting #how to attract prospects #increase #increase traffic #influencer marketing #persuasion power #public #traffic
  • Profile picture of the author Steve B
    Originally Posted by focusedlife View Post

    Depending on how petty or close minded you are, you could totally screw this up

    I'm afraid this is what will happen with most people that purposely "pick a fight" for the sake of building an audience.

    While this strategy can bring a short-term spike in traffic and attention, it's not one that most people will embrace for the long term. Controversy and choosing sides is so commonplace these days . . . I think most of us turn a blind eye to it after our initial momentary interest wanes.

    "Forced" or contrived controversy labels the marketer as "desperate."

    Just my opinion.

    Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author focusedlife
    @Steve B - Forced or contrived, yes, I totally agree.

    But if you're going to go through it anyways, might as well make it public, when it matters to you.

    Just my opinion.
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  • Profile picture of the author agmccall
    But, other than a political site what is there to really fight about. Am I going to argue on my cooking site that butter is better than margarine in such a way that would invoke people to rush to my site to see the outcome. Or if I am in the MMO niche and I going to argue that my pinterest traffic is better than your facebook traffic.

    Like I said, other than political issues I see no real benefit to creating a fight.

    al
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    • Profile picture of the author focusedlife
      Originally Posted by agmccall View Post

      But, other than a political site what is there to really fight about.
      Go to reddit, enjoy.

      Originally Posted by agmccall View Post

      Am I going to argue on my cooking site that butter is better than margarine in such a way that would invoke people to rush to my site to see the outcome.
      Have you not watched Dr. Oz?

      Originally Posted by agmccall View Post

      Or if I am in the MMO niche and I going to argue that my pinterest traffic is better than your facebook traffic.
      If you don't want traffic that matters, but if you can show how one traffic source is better for one target audience than the other and prove your case while simultaneously throwing rocks at a well known authority on the matter, then yes...you can definitely use this to your advantage.

      It doesn't have to be a person that you attack.

      It can be an entity like Google or something.

      Originally Posted by agmccall View Post

      Like I said, other than political issues I see no real benefit to creating a fight.
      Of course you don't because you're not widening your scope. 2 facebook groups I can think of have grown significantly using this and other less obvious tactics.

      Regards,

      Los
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  • Profile picture of the author myob
    From a marketing perspective, controversy can drive publicity and traffic like nothing else that I know of. Appealing to the emotional triggers of your targeted demographics through common ground on controversial issues is a proven effective marketing practice. For example, lessons can be learned from watching the leading contenders in the current political arena. Similarly, conspiracies, religious alignment, social bias, "scientific" debates, etc are also extremely powerful marketing tools.
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  • Profile picture of the author Steve B
    Originally Posted by focusedlife View Post

    Public beefs are entertaining.
    While sometimes true, they can also be disgusting, a huge waste of your time, and often they don't serve a purpose or decide an issue one way or the other.

    If this is your marketing method of choice, it can label you as the guy who is always ready to pick a fight. Remember Geraldo Rivera? He sticks in my mind as a reporter that was always looking for controversy, always looking for a fight, a story, sensationalism and hyperbole. He stands out in my mind as someone "contrived."

    To me, the purpose of your marketing is to brand yourself and sell your offers. IMO, that is best done by understanding you niche audience and catering to their wants and desires.

    Does creating or promoting controversy and fighting in public accomplish that?

    In my mind . . . rarely. Especially when it alienates half your audience needlessly.

    I'm not saying "public fighting" doesn't create some attention - but for me, at least, the risks are too needlessly high in doing it on a regular basis.

    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      Originally Posted by Steve B View Post

      To me, the purpose of your marketing is to brand yourself and sell your offers. IMO, that is best done by understanding you niche audience and catering to their wants and desires.
      But, if your brand represents a strong sentiment of any side in highly polarized segments of your targeted demographics, this can send conversion rates soaring.

      Responsible participation in highly publicized controversial issues is actually quite a powerful marketing strategy for drawing in like-minded prospects.

      We call this "affinity marketing"; where you understand and can relate to the commonality, needs, desires, and even the belief system of your audience.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kurt
    PT Barnum once said that the best way to draw a crowd is to start a fight. This is a tactic used by the KKK. They make a public appearance/rally and want people to disagree with them, starting a confrontation. The media won't cover a peaceful rally, but once there's conflict the media will show up in droves to cover the event.


    This tactic can also be used to help a "lesser" person or company get attention and appear to be an equal of a larger, more famous person or company. If the more famous/larger person or company takes the bait, it makes the lesser an "equal" in the eyes of the masses. If you're a little guy, baiting someone/something more successful than you could be a tactic that works to bring you more attention and level the playing field to a degree. You'll see this quite a bit in the music/entertainment business quite a bit.


    There is some risk to this type of thing, and IMO it's usually better to try to become friends with those that are more successful than enemies.
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  • Profile picture of the author Daniel Evans
    Controversy needn't be fighting,

    Jesus raised controversy with pacifism and it worked well for him.
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  • Profile picture of the author professorrosado
    MYOB hit this on the head!

    There is a real benefit to controversy and strife - supply the arms, the popcorn and the news.

    People will always fight and argue and often need ways to express and win over the other side. A successful marketer provides for their wants (even if he/she also started the thing in the first place - sneaky).
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  • Profile picture of the author Brent Stangel
    Jesus raised controversy with pacifism and it worked well for him
    Priceless!

    PT Barnum once said that the best way to draw a crowd is to start a fight.
    Explain to me your perceived value to your business in starting a fight. I guess if you own a pub, then crowds of angry brawlers may be your target market.

    I prefer to deal with small groups of polite, respectful people...what a loser I am!
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    • Profile picture of the author Kurt
      Originally Posted by Brent Stangel View Post

      Priceless!



      Explain to me your perceived value to your business in starting a fight. I guess if you own a pub, then crowds of angry brawlers may be your target market.

      I prefer to deal with small groups of polite, respectful people...what a loser I am!
      I explained to you how the KKK uses confrontation to get publicity. Do you need me to copy/paste it again? Or can you scroll up a bit and read my comment from beginning to end this time?

      I also guess you also missed my comment about making friends, so I'll repeat it here for your convenience.

      There is some risk to this type of thing, and IMO it's usually better to try to become friends with those that are more successful than enemies.
      I bolded my comment and put it in red this time to make it easier for you to find this time.

      But I do find your comment about polite, respectful people funny, considering you're one of the most confrontational people on this forum.

      And if you have a problem with the PT Barnum quote I posted, take it up with him. I'm just the messenger. After all, it isn't like PT Barnum is as respected as a marketer as you are.
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  • Profile picture of the author gabryellahizon
    I totally agree with everything that you said. They all make sense.
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