Are you tired of entertainers-motivational-speakers?

28 replies
  • OFF TOPIC
  • |
I have to say that I consider myself to be an extremely reasonable person regarding expectations and demands. So, when I attended one conference when the star of the evening was supposed to be one well-known motivational speaker, I didn't expect much. I like to hear some interesting life experiences and a few applicable conclusions. That's it. I don't expect or hope to change my life and begin to earn like never before as soon as I get home after I just heard a thing or two from some motivational speaker, no matter how he or she may be influential or successful. When you end up totally disappointed and emotionally exhausted despite your realistic expectations, then you know that something went deeply wrong with the so-called motivational speaker's show.

Am I the only one to think that the modern motivational speakers are more like professional entertainers than people with that magical spark to change and inspire people around them. The catch is that it has become much better for me to attend some music festival where a pop star can say a thing or two of zen wisdom, and I will feel better and more importantly learn more than attending the classic motivational speaker's event. Nowadays, the motivational speakers all over the world worry more about how they look than what they have to say and share. In a way, motivational speakers are indeed part of the entertaining industry in the general sense, but hey, let's not take the things here quite literally. OK? What's the purpose, if at the end of the day, you entertain rather than to motivate and inspire people? Right?

Just to make sure I have nothing personal against the modern motivational speaker. For what is worth, I have a criterion I use to tell a difference between the entertainers and the genuine motivational speakers. Here it is. You don't have to necessarily agree with it, but I dare you to try on the next motivational speaker you plan to hear or follow. So, I think that a motivational speaker who is dominantly an entertainer are people who have built their careers and names for this activity alone. Meaning, they are professional motivational speakers who have always been motivational speakers and they don't have anything else to show you and be proud of. On the other side, you have people who are genuine motivational speakers because they had successful careers in some other field prior this one, such as sports, movies, politics, etc. These guys have achieved something amazing or experienced some extraordinary events in their lives, which allowed them to gain some unique experiences they can share with others.

Here's one positive example for a change. I attended a business forum sponsored by a large telecommunication network. They hired a former football star as its representative and a motivational speaker. So, this guy who could barely make a step without giving and signing at least a dozen of autographs was surprisingly down to earth person. He used an opportunity to show us the importance of the teamwork by talking about a real life event that took place in a locker room during one well-known and an important game. It was great to hear a true story as a part of the first-hand experience. So, these guys had the moment of truth with their coach, just like you could have seen it in the movies. They eventually won this important game. But my point is that we all had a feeling that we were actually there in that locker room with this football star. He was so emotional and persuasive that it is hard to describe with words.

That was a genuine motivational speaker at work. You could see by the way he moves and the way he was dressed that night that he couldn't possibly care less about his appearance. Yet, when he talked, you can clearly see tears in his eyes. He was going through that emotional experience all over again with all the people in the conference room. So, we had no reason to doubt his presentation nor his genuine experience. When you compare this former football star and the so-called motivational speaker entertainer from the beginning of my story, then you realize how different they really are. If your biggest achievement is a book you wrote about motivation and similar, and then you make money by promoting it all over the world, I can't and will never accept you as a genuine motivational speaker.

What are your thoughts about motivational speakers? What does it take for a person to be accepted and acknowledged by you as a genuine motivational speaker? Do you have a respect for the so-called entertainers-motivational-speakers or you accept this phenomenon as a part of the showbiz industry?
#motivation and support #motivational speakers #tired
  • Profile picture of the author tagiscom
    Overall, no!

    Followed Frank Kern for a while, at least til l got a look at one of his $1800 products, the list one, and quickly learned that he and most others are not selling a golden bullet, but a dream of a golden bullet.

    He is entertaining, and has good advise on how to grow an already successful online business, but how to create wealth from nothing, forget it!

    Most are like that, became successful through dumb luck, and then try to bottle it!

    Apart from Snake Oil Salesmen, luck cannot be bottled.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10911436].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author whateverpedia
    Originally Posted by pinkknight View Post

    motivational speakers are indeed part of the entertaining industry in the general sense,
    Motivational speakers are indeed part of the separate fools from their money industry in the literal sense.

    The only people they motivate are those who are also in the separate fools from their money industry when they see how many chumps actually shell out their hard-earned. They watch and observe so that they too can go out and separate fools (probably the same fools as the original "speaker") from their money.

    Eventually one of two things happens to the fools:

    1) They wake up to the fact that they've been conned;
    2) They run out of money.

    They then have two options:

    1) Accept the fact that they've been conned;
    2) Join the "separate fools from their money" speaking circuit and separate other fools from their money.
    Signature
    Why do garden gnomes smell so bad?
    So that blind people can hate them as well.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10911499].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by whateverpedia View Post

      Motivational speakers are indeed part of the separate fools from their money industry in the literal sense.

      The only people they motivate are those who are also in the separate fools from their money industry when they see how many chumps actually shell out their hard-earned. They watch and observe so that they too can go out and separate fools (probably the same fools as the original "speaker") from their money.

      Eventually one of two things happens to the fools:

      1) They wake up to the fact that they've been conned;
      2) They run out of money.

      They then have two options:

      1) Accept the fact that they've been conned;
      2) Join the "separate fools from their money" speaking circuit and separate other fools from their money.
      I was never a motivational speaker. But I was a speaker, and my goal was entirely to separate the money from the audience....just like every businessperson.

      I don't know about all speakers, but I gave great content, even if the person didn't buy. And I wanted my customers to succeed.

      But there is an absolute truth in speaking.....

      Most of the people that buy from you are fools. It's not that you target them, but they are mostly the ones who buy. The people who buy fall into two extreme groups;

      1) The successful people looking for that extra edge, that they can implement to make themselves more money.
      2) The desperate people, barely hanging on, that are looking for someone to save them.

      And unfortunately, the second group is the vast bulk of the buyers. I don't want it to be true, but it is. These two groups are also the way the people that attend these seminars fall. Very few middle of the road good business people. Mostly at the extremes.

      I'd love to change it, but that's the reality.

      Sure there are shysters, con men, who sell crap that can't work. But even the people selling a proven workable system, great information....are mostly selling to people that will never do anything.

      80% of all the business books sold, are never read. That isn't the fault of the author.

      And after speaking for 30 years, I can't go on stage without feeling a low grade contempt for the audience...because i know who they mostly are.

      It's not that I want to take money from fools...but that's mostly the audience that shows up.

      Two years ago, I stopped speaking at my core industry's annual trade show. I was the Keynote speaker one year, and was the only paid speaker for he last 15 years or so. And every time I spoke, I made lots of money, made lots of sales (or courses and services).

      And every year, it would be the same audience. A few (maybe 5%) were successful people who just wanted to see my next thing, because they got value from it in past years. But the rest were the "barely hanging on" crowd, that were still looking for that miracle that would save them. And every year they bought what I had. And I took they money too.

      It's one of the reasons I stopped selling packages of information, and started selling services. If I sell a service, I know they will benefit, despite themselves.


      Did you know that nearly all weight loss products and exercise machines are sold to people who will never use them?
      Do you know why the single most important feature an exercise machine can have...is that it collapses, and fits under the bed? Why? So it becomes less likely that it will be returned. It's far more likely to be stored under the bed, and forgotten.
      Signature
      One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

      "Be kind. For everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle".....Ian Maclaren
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10913173].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author whateverpedia
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        I was never a motivational speaker. But I was a speaker, and my goal was entirely to separate the money from the audience....just like every businessperson.

        I don't know about all speakers, but I gave great content, even if the person didn't buy. And I wanted my customers to succeed.

        But there is an absolute truth in speaking.....

        Most of the people that buy from you are fools. It's not that you target them, but they are mostly the ones who buy. The people who buy fall into two extreme groups;

        1) The successful people looking for that extra edge, that they can implement to make themselves more money.
        2) The desperate people, barely hanging on, that are looking for someone to save them.

        And unfortunately, the second group is the vast bulk of the buyers. I don't want it to be true, but it is. These two groups are also the way the people that attend these seminars fall. Very few middle of the road good business people. Mostly at the extremes.

        I'd love to change it, but that's the reality.

        Sure there are shysters, con men, who sell crap that can't work. But even the people selling a proven workable system, great information....are mostly selling to people that will never do anything.

        80% of all the business books sold, are never read. That isn't the fault of the author.

        And after speaking for 30 years, I can't go on stage without feeling a low grade contempt for the audience...because i know who they mostly are.

        It's not that I want to take money from fools...but that's mostly the audience that shows up.

        Two years ago, I stopped speaking at my core industry's annual trade show. I was the Keynote speaker one year, and was the only paid speaker for he last 15 years or so. And every time I spoke, I made lots of money, made lots of sales (or courses and services).

        And every year, it would be the same audience. A few (maybe 5%) were successful people who just wanted to see my next thing, because they got value from it in past years. But the rest were the "barely hanging on" crowd, that were still looking for that miracle that would save them. And every year they bought what I had. And I took they money too.

        It's one of the reasons I stopped selling packages of information, and started selling services. If I sell a service, I know they will benefit, despite themselves.


        Did you know that nearly all weight loss products and exercise machines are sold to people who will never use them?
        Do you know why the single most important feature an exercise machine can have...is that it collapses, and fits under the bed? Why? So it becomes less likely that it will be returned. It's far more likely to be stored under the bed, and forgotten.
        There's a big difference between what you do, and what "motivational" speakers do.

        Everyone attending your talks knows full well the (ahem) motivation behind it. You have a product to sell, and you're trying to convince people to buy that product. It may be dressed up differently, but everyone knows what's happening.

        With motivational speakers what they're selling is no more than you'd get from a decent book of quotations. The audience is there hoping that some profound insight that is going to change their lives is going to be imparted. In the end, they'd get the same result for a damn sight cheaper if they just bought that book of quotations.

        There really isn't much difference between the speakers and their audience, and dodgy religious cults. People looking for direction and purpose being preyed upon by charismatic charlatans.
        Signature
        Why do garden gnomes smell so bad?
        So that blind people can hate them as well.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10913461].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author BigFrank
          Banned
          Originally Posted by whateverpedia View Post

          There's a big difference between what you do, and what "motivational" speakers do.
          True - at least motivational speakers pretend to be offering something of value. Claude? Not so much.

          Frank
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10913489].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by whateverpedia View Post

          With motivational speakers what they're selling is no more than you'd get from a decent book of quotations. The audience is there hoping that some profound insight that is going to change their lives is going to be imparted. In the end, they'd get the same result for a damn sight cheaper if they just bought that book of quotations.
          Completely true. But it's being in the presence of the Guru that sells the whole idea.


          Originally Posted by whateverpedia View Post


          There really isn't much difference between the speakers and their audience, and dodgy religious cults. People looking for direction and purpose being preyed upon by charismatic charlatans.
          First. All religious cults are dodgy. All cult leaders are charlatans.

          And many speakers have a following, just like a cult..that buys everything they sell, attends every event, and thinks the guru is the fountain of all knowledge.

          That group...or "herd" is what makes a guru rich.

          I thought seriously of trying to build a herd of buyers, mostly people that would pay about $1,000 a month to be part of a Mastermind Group. I spoke at many events where this idea was being sold. Often, the guru, with a crowd of only a couple hundred, would net a million dollars from a weekend.

          One such even was to a group of about 1,000 home inspectors, and after a 3 day event, about 200 started paying $1,500 a month for coaching. That's about three million dollars for a weekend...plus product sales, plus profit splits with the speakers.
          I was the last speaker, and made the most money there (except for the host, selling coaching).

          For three days, every speaker (except me) cried on stage. Every testimonial had the attendee crying. The host cried dozens of times that weekend.


          Afterward, after the host saw me speak...the host told me I should be a guru, with my own niche, selling high end coaching. And for a few years, I built up a profitable group that paid me every month....and after 4 years, just dropped them all.

          I just don't have the stomach for it.

          At a conference I spoke at, an attendee said to me "You're a rock star". I said "Only in this room. as soon as I walk out the door, I'm the guy that forgot to take out the garbage".

          I have no sense of celebrity, or being in awe of another person, or hero worship. Having lack of empathy makes these three day emotional deluges intolerable.

          Being in an event, where I have to be "On" for three days...is exhausting. Faking interest, pretending to be in awe of the host, and constantly selling the idea that smart people buy from the speakers....wears me out.

          I was at a conference where a woman was selling her coaching program for $25,000 a year. The only ability she had was as a palmist, and she could convince people to give her $25,000 a year. I told a friend that was with me, "People are rushing to the back of the room to sign up for her "I'll be your friend and read your palm for $25,000 a year" program".
          Signature
          One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

          "Be kind. For everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle".....Ian Maclaren
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10913598].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author mkkhatri
    Banned
    [DELETED]
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10912747].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author tagiscom
      Originally Posted by mkkhatri View Post

      yeah, i am because they don't speak any thing new and all is just a repeat for me.
      True, Frank Kern, says "buy my S**t", all of the time, but l won't!

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10912834].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author pinkknight
        Originally Posted by tagiscom View Post

        True, Frank Kern, says "buy my S**t", all of the time, but l won't!

        Just realized I need to add this:

        Entertainer + Salesman = Bad Motivational Speaker who only aims to inspire his own wallet rather than people around him.

        You're right. They keep saying buy my book or disc or whatever, instead change this and that in your life. OK, I will appreciate genuine motivational speakers even more. Thx.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10912847].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author yukon
        Banned
        Originally Posted by tagiscom View Post

        True, Frank Kern, says "buy my S**t", all of the time, but l won't!


        Why not?






        ..........
        Signature
        Hi
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10915250].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author tagiscom
          Originally Posted by yukon View Post

          Why not?
          ..........
          Mainly because his s**t is too expensive.

          But l did take a squizz at his List $1800 one, and let's just say, there was no golden ticket there.

          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10915284].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author tagiscom
    Originally Posted by pinkknight View Post

    Just realized I need to add this:

    Entertainer + Salesman = Bad Motivational Speaker who only aims to inspire his own wallet rather than people around him.

    You're right. They keep saying buy my book or disc or whatever, instead change this and that in your life. OK, I will appreciate genuine motivational speakers even more. Thx.
    No probs, but as Claude has so courageously said, buy my stuff, and you will take care of my financial obligations.



    Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

    I was never a motivational speaker. But I was a speaker, and my goal was entirely to separate the money from the audience....just like every businessperson.

    I don't know about all speakers, but I gave great content, even if the person didn't buy. And I wanted my customers to succeed.

    But there is an absolute truth in speaking.....

    Most of the people that buy from you are fools. It's not that you target them, but they are mostly the ones who buy. The people who buy fall into two extreme groups;

    1) The successful people looking for that extra edge, that they can implement to make themselves more money.
    2) The desperate people, barely hanging on, that are looking for someone to save them.

    And unfortunately, the second group is the vast bulk of the buyers. I don't want it to be true, but it is. These two groups are also the way the people that attend these seminars fall. Very few middle of the road good business people. Mostly at the extremes.

    I'd love to change it, but that's the reality.

    Sure there are shysters, con men, who sell crap that can't work. But even the people selling a proven workable system, great information....are mostly selling to people that will never do anything.

    80% of all the business books sold, are never read. That isn't the fault of the author.

    And after speaking for 30 years, I can't go on stage without feeling a low grade contempt for the audience...because i know who they mostly are.
    No wonder Frank Kern keeps saying "buy my S**t"!

    It is good s**t, but it won't show you how to create guaranteed wealth from nothing.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10913181].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by tagiscom View Post

      No wonder Frank Kern keeps saying "buy my S**t"!

      It is good s**t, but it won't show you how to create guaranteed wealth from nothing.

      Do you really think any information, and plan, any system will make you successful?

      Even in my speeches, I tell people "I can't do it for you. I can shave time off the learning curve....steer you away from time wasting mistakes...but you have to put in the work. I can give you a map, but you still have to work the gold mine".


      You know what most hear out of that? "Goldmine. He promised a goldmine".

      And when they aren't instantly rich..by touching my program....they think it didn't work.

      I still read books on selling. Me. Why? Because there is at least one new idea in every book, no matter how bad it is. You have to dig for the gold.



      I heard someone say once "If you are riding the bus at 20, it's because you are starting out, making mistakes, life's an adventure. If you are still riding the bus at 50...that's who you are."

      I have a brother in law that's 70 years old...still looking for the great opportunity that will make him rich. And every month, he visits our store, asking for money. And now, that's just part of a routine.
      Signature
      One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

      "Be kind. For everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle".....Ian Maclaren
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10913231].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author pinkknight
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        Do you really think any information, and plan, any system will make you successful?

        Even in my speeches, I tell people "I can't do it for you. I can shave time off the learning curve....steer you away from time wasting mistakes...but you have to put in the work. I can give you a map, but you still have to work the gold mine".


        You know what most hear out of that? "Goldmine. He promised a goldmine".

        And when they aren't instantly rich..by touching my program....they think it didn't work.

        I still read books on selling. Me. Why? Because there is at least one new idea in every book, no matter how bad it is. You have to dig for the gold.



        I heard someone say once "If you are riding the bus at 20, it's because you are starting out, making mistakes, life's an adventure. If you are still riding the bus at 50...that's who you are."

        I have a brother in law that's 70 years old...still looking for the great opportunity that will make him rich. And every month, he visits our store, asking for money. And now, that's just part of a routine.
        Just saw, I think that was the last episode before the election day, John Oliver's last week tonight when he was talking about the MLM and the so-called pyramid schemes. As you might have guessed there were quite a few motivational speakers who turned their presentations into entertaining spectacles almost like rock concerts. One of them even used GNR Welcome to the Jungle, lol. If you are saying something and you aren't believing what you're saying for some obvious material benefit, just to sell or find new users/customers, then I really don't know what to say. You have probably heard about Nick Vujicic a motivational speaker without limbs. I missed an excellent opportunity to hear him in person and I feel bad about it. Again, I really don't know what to say. You're talking in front of the people who came to hear something positive and inspirational, rather than to be turned into buyers. I'm going to start thinking that only "amateur" motivational speakers can be the only ones you can actually trust.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10913351].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by pinkknight View Post

          Just saw, I think that was the last episode before the election day, John Oliver's last week tonight when he was talking about the MLM and the so-called pyramid schemes. As you might have guessed there were quite a few motivational speakers who turned their presentations into entertaining spectacles almost like rock concerts. One of them even used GNR Welcome to the Jungle,.
          I saw that. Although I'm a huge fan of John Oliver, I thought the piece was unfair. There is a difference between an MLM as a means of distribution, and a pyramid scheme. A pyramid scheme pays you for recruiting. An MLM pays you for purchases (assuming they will somehow be sold) to members of your downline.

          The big problem with MLM organizations is this;
          MLM is a sales business. It involves selling. Really. But it's almost universally promoted to no-sales people. These are people that wouldn't try to make a sale if their life depended on it. And the business is promoted to them as a non selling business. And so they buy product (that part is easy) but never actually sell anything.

          And they do what non salespeople do, when trying to promote their MLM...they make outrageous claims. "It cured my cancer" is very common...."My cat's cataracts went away after a month". Jeesh. It turns into a quasi-religious meeting, because the people putting on the meeting, and the ones they are recruiting...aren't business people.

          And it's impossible to teach a person...who doesn't want to sell anything...how to sell.

          And that's why almost everyone gets stuck with a garage full of stuff.
          Signature
          One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

          "Be kind. For everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle".....Ian Maclaren
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10913376].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author Kurt
            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

            I saw that. Although I'm a huge fan of John Oliver, I thought the piece was unfair. There is a difference between an MLM as a means of distribution, and a pyramid scheme. A pyramid scheme pays you for recruiting. An MLM pays you for purchases (assuming they will somehow be sold) to members of your downline.

            The big problem with MLM organizations is this;
            MLM is a sales business. It involves selling. Really. But it's almost universally promoted to no-sales people. These are people that wouldn't try to make a sale if their life depended on it. And the business is promoted to them as a non selling business. And so they buy product (that part is easy) but never actually sell anything.

            And they do what non salespeople do, when trying to promote their MLM...they make outrageous claims. "It cured my cancer" is very common...."My cat's cataracts went away after a month". Jeesh. It turns into a quasi-religious meeting, because the people putting on the meeting, and the ones they are recruiting...aren't business people.

            And it's impossible to teach a person...who doesn't want to sell anything...how to sell.

            And that's why almost everyone gets stuck with a garage full of stuff.

            If I remember correctly, Oliver did explain the differences between MLM and pyramid schemes.

            I don't have a lot of actual experience with MLM, but IMO the biggest problem people have with them is that people look to recruit people to sell, and the people they recruit do the same thing, try to find other people to sell.

            My un-expert advice for people wanting to get into MLM is to be willing to sell. If you only try to find other people to sell, remember they will do the same thing.
            Signature
            Discover the fastest and easiest ways to create your own valuable products.
            Tons of FREE Public Domain content you can use to make your own content, PLR, digital and POD products.
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10913615].message }}
            • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
              Originally Posted by Kurt View Post

              If I remember correctly, Oliver did explain the differences between MLM and pyramid schemes.
              He did, but he was partially incorrect. He said that a pyramid scheme is where the downline buys the product, rather than buying it to sell. And that's why people get stuck with product (to qualify for position and bonuses).

              The truth is, nearly every MLM is supported by the downline consuming product. Very little actually gets sold.

              There are actually pyramids that charge large up front fees for a training program, or a "distributorship". Or where you pay a large fee for a position...and this money is what is paid to the downline. Those are really scams, because nothing is really being sold, except distributorships.

              Requiring a huge up front purchase to start out is also a sign of a pyramid. If you have to pay $5,000 in product, just to start out...that means that the commissions are made on this front end loading, and not subsequent sales (or at least the continued sales aren't the main source of income).

              For a few years, I was with a company called Alpine (later ExoQuest). They sold $600 air purifiers. Most f the money was made at retail,selling to consumers. And it attracted actual salespeople. A friend of mine, Julius Toth, in 1999 (I think) was the largest distributor for them in the world. He made $300,000 in override commissions that year. Not really that much, considering he was the top guy. But he also made $400,000 in retail profit, selling these machines at malls, through the mail, and with a small sales force.

              I made a couple hundred thousand myself, just selling at home shows and malls.

              That MLM was built on retail sales. The major problem was....nobody buys air purifiers every month. They buy one, and that pretty much it. So repeat sales were almost non-existent. So you couldn't depend on internal consumption, If people stopped selling at retail, the overrides stopped. And they did.
              Signature
              One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

              "Be kind. For everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle".....Ian Maclaren
              {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10914889].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author pinkknight
            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

            I saw that. Although I'm a huge fan of John Oliver, I thought the piece was unfair. There is a difference between an MLM as a means of distribution, and a pyramid scheme. A pyramid scheme pays you for recruiting. An MLM pays you for purchases (assuming they will somehow be sold) to members of your downline.

            The big problem with MLM organizations is this;
            MLM is a sales business. It involves selling. Really. But it's almost universally promoted to no-sales people. These are people that wouldn't try to make a sale if their life depended on it. And the business is promoted to them as a non selling business. And so they buy product (that part is easy) but never actually sell anything.

            And they do what non salespeople do, when trying to promote their MLM...they make outrageous claims. "It cured my cancer" is very common...."My cat's cataracts went away after a month". Jeesh. It turns into a quasi-religious meeting, because the people putting on the meeting, and the ones they are recruiting...aren't business people.

            And it's impossible to teach a person...who doesn't want to sell anything...how to sell.

            And that's why almost everyone gets stuck with a garage full of stuff.
            Yeah, I hear you, but I was referring only to the part with the MLM motivational speakers. You know, as an example of the notorious category of motivational-speakers-entertainers. Guess, this is the most brutal form of I motivate you to buy and nothing more. Wait a sec. Is there a motivational speaker who isn't selling something? For instance, his/her books or services. Can this be an acceptable definition? A true motivational speaker does his "job" for the sake of motivation itself and nothing more. True or false.
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10915357].message }}
            • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
              Originally Posted by pinkknight View Post

              Is there a motivational speaker who isn't selling something? For instance, his/her books or services. Can this be an acceptable definition? A true motivational speaker does his "job" for the sake of motivation itself and nothing more. True or false.

              There are speakers who simply get paid to perform, that have no product to sell. These tend to be the high paid Keynote speakers. When I was hired as a Keynote speaker it was always agreed that no pitch was in the Keynote address. You were paid strictly to perform.

              There are motivational speakers who have no product, not even books. But that simply means they don't know how to sell. Having product (DVDs, CDs, programs, coaching, memberships) is a natural extension of a speaking business.

              Think of a singer or stand up comedian that has no back end product (CDs of them performing). Any performer worth their salt has back end product.

              Can you imagine a singer say "I've been singing for ten years, but have never recorded a record. You can't download my music anywhere. I just get paid to perform"?

              A motivational speaker that lacks any skill in keeping you motivated...by providing you with programs you can listen to later, isn't very motivating to me.

              There are speakers that have no product. But these generally aren't people making a living from speaking. They usually work for a company and just speak for free part time.

              Originally Posted by SteveJohnson View Post

              Just a note on the MLM thing - I know and have known several people who are wildly successful and very wealthy MLM distributors. Every single one of them built a retail business for themselves first, then recruited other people and taught them to do the same thing.

              They had to recruit ~10 people to find 2 who would duplicate their efforts. It, like sales in general, is a numbers game.

              The MLM programs sold consumable items that people bought month-in and month-out, unlike Claude's example of air purifiers.
              That's it exactly. You have to teach your downline how to sell at retail. At least sell enough to move the product you need to buy every month.Everyone in MLM can find a dozen people that will just buy product from them every month.

              And sometimes these retail sales become a significant source of income. And actually selling product keeps the people involved. If they just buy product, and don't sell anything, they drop out. You can't make any money in MLM (or any business) by just buying. You also have to sell.
              Signature
              One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

              "Be kind. For everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle".....Ian Maclaren
              {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10915764].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author BigFrank
    Banned
    Frank Kern is so ridiculously funny that on more than one occasion I have been tempted to PayPal him some money as a way of showing my appreciation for the belly-laughs he has provided me over the years.

    Anyone that uses the word 'shit' to define his products should be avoided at all costs. I'm astounded that people would pay him money.

    I can't say anything about him personally, as I do not know the man, but as far as sales goes, he is the ultimate huckster.

    Frank
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10913295].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author pinkknight
      Originally Posted by BigFrank View Post

      Frank Kern is so ridiculously funny that on more than one occasion I have been tempted to PayPal him some money as a way of showing my appreciation for the belly-laughs he has provided me over the years.

      Anyone that uses the word 'shit' to define his products should be avoided at all costs. I'm astounded that people would pay him money.

      I can't say anything about him personally, as I do not know the man, but as far as sales goes, he is the ultimate huckster.

      Frank
      Guess I have no other choice than to Google this guy. I need to see why people take him as an example of this "industry."
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10913356].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author BigFrank
        Banned
        Originally Posted by pinkknight View Post

        Guess I have no other choice than to Google this guy. I need to see why people take him as an example of this "industry."
        Be careful of what you read on the Internet. lol

        Frank
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10913389].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author tagiscom
    Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

    Do you really think any information, and plan, any system will make you successful?

    Even in my speeches, I tell people "I can't do it for you. I can shave time off the learning curve....steer you away from time wasting mistakes...but you have to put in the work. I can give you a map, but you still have to work the gold mine".


    You know what most hear out of that? "Goldmine. He promised a goldmine".

    And when they aren't instantly rich..by touching my program....they think it didn't work.

    I still read books on selling. Me. Why? Because there is at least one new idea in every book, no matter how bad it is. You have to dig for the gold.



    I heard someone say once "If you are riding the bus at 20, it's because you are starting out, making mistakes, life's an adventure. If you are still riding the bus at 50...that's who you are."

    I have a brother in law that's 70 years old...still looking for the great opportunity that will make him rich. And every month, he visits our store, asking for money. And now, that's just part of a routine.
    No Claude, l don't think that anyone has a system that will create wealth.

    Most had dumb luck, and then tried to bottle it. Frank Kern saw an opportunity and used it just before it was made illegal.

    I am doing fonts, and learning from others who are doing very well from it. I have also been invited to a closed Slack group at CM, and learning a few more trade secrets there.

    Every font l do gets me closer to one that is successful, and the above statement is naive, to say the least.

    If someone works at one thing til he is 50, then it might be valid, but someone who tries several things, to whittle it down to the best option, then stays with that not so much.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10913803].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by tagiscom View Post

      Every font l do gets me closer to one that is successful, and the above statement is naive, to say the least.
      I think you have it, Shane. The key to wealth is choosing the right font. Good luck.
      Signature
      One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

      "Be kind. For everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle".....Ian Maclaren
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10913909].message }}
  • {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10914112].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author SteveJohnson
    Just a note on the MLM thing - I know and have known several people who are wildly successful and very wealthy MLM distributors. Every single one of them built a retail business for themselves first, then recruited other people and taught them to do the same thing.

    They had to recruit ~10 people to find 2 who would duplicate their efforts. It, like sales in general, is a numbers game.

    The MLM programs sold consumable items that people bought month-in and month-out, unlike Claude's example of air purifiers.
    Signature

    The 2nd Amendment, 1789 - The Original Homeland Security.

    Gun control means never having to say, "I missed you."

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10915240].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author lanfear63
    My wife uses Nikken health products. She loves them and they are good, she buys them and uses them herself even now.

    A few years back, not only was she adorning our house with all of them, she was an active rep, trying to sell them to others, went to all the meetings. A few sales but she was no fantastic salesperson and failed, not totally her fault, lack of contacts. Nikken is sold totally via MLM

    (Ironic to think though, that the one big multi product sale she made literally brought a woman friend of hers back from near death. I have first hand confirmation of this)

    As always, the person with the biggest active downline wins. Most people fail.

    There were two couples we knew that were the top performers in North America. One was a Naturopath and had a practice. (captive audience) The other was a retired Colonel. A huge backlog of friends and contacts in the military. Both made sales and built downlines.

    A third person though, had none of these advantages. He just had the gift of the gab, was knowledgeable on the products and would talk to anyone. He was infectious, a natural salesman.

    The top earners are the ones who start it. Then there are the people who can use the products in their business they are in, then we see the person with the big network of friends and contacts.

    Finally, the rare one, the good salesman.
    Signature

    Marriage, For The Best Arguments

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10915375].message }}
  • When we see a person who walk his talk, then we can truly accept him. Also motivational speaker speaks of practical and simple things and how to become extraordinary by following simple things. One of the growing entrepreneur said that she always listen to steve jobs and others in order to keep her encouraged and gain confidence. We can also follow this strategy
    Signature
    Internet Marketing Virtual Assistant - Daily Internet Marketing in a budget!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10915673].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author BigFrank
      Banned
      Originally Posted by OBVA VirtualAssistants View Post

      When we see a person who walk his talk, then we can truly accept him.
      Can you be any more simplistic?

      Frank
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10915729].message }}

Trending Topics