Inviting all Warriors here who have Quit Smoking or Wanted to Quit!

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Hello everyone,

I'm writing an ebook called 'The Biggest Reason I'm Still Smoking' mainly coz I've made a few and it's always helpful to learn from others.

Would anybody be prepared to share some ot their problems what comes to quit smoking. Maybe you are still in your early days about quitting and you have just one big obstacle or you have been trying to stop for years and have many stories and reasons to share?

I will gladly included your link in the ebook from any quote/anecdote you can provide.


Thank you very much!

Sincerely,

Mike
#how to quit smoking #quit smoking #quit smoking ebook #quit smoking tips
  • Profile picture of the author pethanks
    That's a great invitation. You can make a difference in the lives of many people.
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  • Profile picture of the author Doug
    I'm probably not much help...

    I smoked for close to 15 years, quit 17 years ago, cold turkey. I realized just after lighting one up how few times I actually enjoyed smoking a cigarette, maybe a handful. So I stomped out the lit one, reached in my pocket for the pack there and threw it into the trash.

    Never smoked since. No cravings, no thoughts...done.
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    • Profile picture of the author Swine43
      Originally Posted by Doug View Post

      I'm probably not much help...

      I smoked for close to 15 years, quit 17 years ago, cold turkey. I realized just after lighting one up how few times I actually enjoyed smoking a cigarette, maybe a handful. So I stomped out the lit one, reached in my pocket for the pack there and threw it into the trash.

      Never smoked since. No cravings, no thoughts...done.
      Hey Doug,

      That's a one great success story shared!
      Congrats!

      Please share more cases...
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    • Profile picture of the author SJstar
      Very nice, Doug. I wish my dad had that much courage, he's been smoking for over 40 years! He's lucky he hasn't been diagnosed with a serious illness related to smoking thus far, but I fear it's coming if he doesn't quit.
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      • Profile picture of the author sans
        I was thinking about non smokers and what they do instead.
        As a smoker for more years then I would like to mention I smoked with a morning coffee
        between meals after meals while watching TV and just before leaving home to go somewhere.

        Now I have given up I find it hard to sit and watch TV I cant settle, I am not a sweet eater so I found myself eating huge amounts of peanuts but they made me thirsty and so a coffee and then a craving for a smoke, and I am not always wanting to eat.

        Now I found a solution thanks to baby teething rings I can sit chewing on that and twist it around in my hand sort of a cigarette substitute, its a lot to do with the ritual of lighting up and using the hand to hold the cigarette and pass to the mouth.

        I still cant figure out what non smokers do, do they eat more, knit, jog? what do they use when stressed?

        I would like their secrets or do they have other habits like chewing finger nails or something.

        In these four months I have washed everything in my home to get rid of smoke smell rearranged my furniture worked more in the yard spent more time on the net Oh! that is hard writing for my blogs my brain don't work too well without a smoke yes thinking is hard
        all alone, but I am getting better I can breath without choking now and I can play with the grandsons for longer so when the craving starts up I think of these things and flick the devil off my shoulder.

        I also ask my visitors smoke out side in the yard so I don't see or smell the smoke.

        Where I live in Fremantle they started banning smoking in pubs and clubs so many patrons stood out side with beer in one hand and cigarette in other now you are not allowed to smoke in the street unless you are walking and are so many meters away from store doors I think this makes more people drink at home

        and if you have a child in your car you are not allowed to smoke I think that is fair enough for the children s health.

        But all these rules do make smokers feel like criminals and that is not fair after all when a lot of us were young we were told smoking was glamorous all the ads had beautiful women or hunky handsome men looking so happy with a smoke.

        Poor us being hypnotized into thinking we could be just like them.
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  • Profile picture of the author foxtrot3
    Quit in March of 2009 after 50 years. Extremely grateful that I was able to do it.
    Just wish I had never started. Allen Carr's The Easy Way to Stop Smoking
    plus a lot of determination did it for me. See my sig.
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    • Profile picture of the author Vince-the-prince
      I was smoking 40 cigarettes per weekday and 60 at weekends had tried to pack up but it is just so hard to break a habit. Then one day/evening after coming home after a shift was caught by a documentary where a surgeon had just removed a lung from a dead man. Holding this black chunk of slimy material up he announced that this, referring to the lung, is the direct result of cigarette smoking.

      Well this was the turning point for me, I had the reason to give up. I started to say to myself, over and over again, that only idiots smoke and I am not an idiot. I then stopped smoking cold turkey. I had tried cutting down but that did just not work for me, it was all or nothing.

      Over the following three weeks I was tempted but kept going, I told everyone I knew that I had packed up smoking but despite being my friends they kept offering me cigarettes (some friends hey?). Then I gave in, having told my wife to go and get me some cigarettes from the local pub, she refused, so I stormed off to the pub straight to the bar where I purchased a packed of my brand, had the wrapper off it before I got to the door of the pub and lit up.

      Now because I had smoked so many cigarettes a day from first thing in the morning till last thing at night I was not affected with dizziness or light headedness until this time. I was half way across the road outside the pub when the horrible taste and dizziness and light headedness hit me. Now is the time I said to myself throw away the cigarette, only idiots smoke and you are not an idiot. That is what I did. I threw away the cigarette and before I got home I gave the cigarettes that were left in the packet to the man who lived next door to me.

      I later regretted giving the cigarettes to him, not because I wanted to have them myself but because I was helping him harm himself. That all took place in 1975 and I have not had a smoke since. I still get the urge but repeat my only idiots smoke mantra and now I am free.

      Here is what you need to pack up smoking... A strong desire to stop and a good enough reason for you to stop. It is "the reason" that gives you the strong desire.
      Hope my experience helps
      best wishes
      vtp
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      Be the best by making others better

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  • Profile picture of the author amoro
    Me too little by little i started quiting because me and my wife planning to have a baby and our doctor's suggestion is to stop smoking. So i'm trying for the good result of my wife's pregnancy.
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    • Profile picture of the author Swine43
      Originally Posted by foxtrot3 View Post

      Quit in March of 2009 after 50 years. Extremely grateful that I was able to do it.
      Just wish I had never started. Allen Carr's The Easy Way to Stop Smoking
      plus a lot of determination did it for me. See my sig.
      I read the same book and it was one of the biggest reason I quit smoking also. Allen Carr helped me to change my MINDSET what comes to waiting the next smoke.

      Originally Posted by Vince-the-prince View Post

      I was smoking 40 cigarettes per weekday and 60 at weekends had tried to pack up but it is just so hard to break a habit. Then one day/evening after coming home after a shift was caught by a documentary where a surgeon had just removed a lung from a dead man. Holding this black chunk of slimy material up he announced that this, referring to the lung, is the direct result of cigarette smoking.

      Well this was the turning point for me, I had the reason to give up. I started to say to myself, over and over again, that only idiots smoke and I am not an idiot. I then stopped smoking cold turkey. I had tried cutting down but that did just not work for me, it was all or nothing.

      Over the following three weeks I was tempted but kept going, I told everyone I knew that I had packed up smoking but despite being my friends they kept offering me cigarettes (some friends hey?). Then I gave in, having told my wife to go and get me some cigarettes from the local pub, she refused, so I stormed off to the pub straight to the bar where I purchased a packed of my brand, had the wrapper off it before I got to the door of the pub and lit up.

      Now because I had smoked so many cigarettes a day from first thing in the morning till last thing at night I was not affected with dizziness or light headedness until this time. I was half way across the road outside the pub when the horrible taste and dizziness and light headedness hit me. Now is the time I said to myself throw away the cigarette, only idiots smoke and you are not an idiot. That is what I did. I threw away the cigarette and before I got home I gave the cigarettes that were left in the packet to the man who lived next door to me.

      I later regretted giving the cigarettes to him, not because I wanted to have them myself but because I was helping him harm himself. That all took place in 1975 and I have not had a smoke since. I still get the urge but repeat my only idiots smoke mantra and now I am free.

      Here is what you need to pack up smoking... A strong desire to stop and a good enough reason for you to stop. It is "the reason" that gives you the strong desire.
      Hope my experience helps
      best wishes
      vtp
      Wonderful Story, Vince! That's VERY true that only idiots smoke! But those idiots must be a little bit of unawared too...

      Originally Posted by amoro View Post

      Me too little by little i started quiting because me and my wife planning to have a baby and our doctor's suggestion is to stop smoking. So i'm trying for the good result of my wife's pregnancy.
      I wish you'll get your baby you deserve and a healthy one! That's one step closer because you're quitting smoking. My best wishes to you!

      I'm very happy this thread have become lively. More stories are welcomed!

      Thanks, Mike.
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      • Profile picture of the author Swine43
        Originally Posted by Patrician View Post

        Just someone who is going to try to quit again - what I have learned -

        I actually switched to additive free cigarettes a few years ago, which are much more expensive and less harmful - as they say it is all the chemicals, not the tobacco that bites. They taste and smell even worse than regular cigs. I chain smoked these (1 pack plus per day)

        Then I got an electronic cigarette and it is one of those that supposes the addiction is nicotine - it delivers nicotine - MORE than the ultra light cigs I smoked - but no carbon monoxide (from the burning).

        It tastes beautiful, does not stink up your house and you do not burn everything and get ashes everywhere. It even has 'smoke' that is not really smoke but harmless vapors. It's really good. (US made puresmokeonline.com) (I get them cheaper at the Wholesale Cigarette Store - Carton is $15 vs $50 for cigs (after 1 time $45 device with USB charger).

        It took away the 'FIEND' (searching the garbage for butts if it is too late to go out) - I can go overnight without cigarettes because I have my electronic buddy.

        Swell. Why am I still craving cigarettes? I will tell you why - since I have eliminated ALL of the chemicals (except nicotine) now, it is that my body is addicted to carbon monoxide. That is the only difference between cig and electronic cig.

        Anything your body gets used to - creates an addiction.

        OK - now the plot thickens. I also chain drink coffee - strong home ground beans. I always figured well I will give up coffee because it goes with cigarettes but I will do that after.

        Guess what - the speed in the coffee makes me smoke more. So need to kick them both together - maybe just one cup in the morning - maybe not since I did not drink any since Saturday morning and have barely smoked because:

        Here is what is helping me now and what is working. I got very sick last Saturday and went to the emergency. They gave me this antibiotic that is very strong. It has made me so nauseated that I really can't smoke except between doses. Coffee also tastes really bad (tried some today).

        Now where do we get something that will make us nauseated so we won't smoke? I don't know and it is a horrible feeling but I guess not as horrible as lung cancer.

        I am going to run with this - I have 4 more days of these pills and a few more cigarettes in the house -

        Supporting this is the TERROR of being in the emergency hospital and realizing how health issues are no joke - real disease is PAINFUL and being in that environment with sick and maybe dying people is HORROR.

        I don't want to go there.

        Cigarettes are foul - all the way around - they taste and smell bad - they make your skin discolored and wrinkled on your face - Quit and you will see a difference in your face in days. (proven)

        = this is not to mention the real RISK of Lung Cancer, Emphysema, Heart Attacks, Strokes (in the emergency I talked to a lady whose daughter was in a wheel chair - from a heart attack she became paralyzed - yeh - don't think you necessarily have a heart attack and move on afterward back to normal.)

        It is no joke, Yo. We need to QUIT NOW!

        p.s. Thank you for this useful topic, hope this gives you some data, and I hope you do well with your report, Mike.
        Thank you so much, Patrician, for this long and informative post! I'm sure I'll get some data out ot that!

        We HAVE to quit smoking now and not LATER!

        Thanks, Mike

        Originally Posted by Michael Oksa View Post

        I never quit 16+ years ago, but I haven't smoked since then either.

        Huh?

        I had tried "quitting" several times before that, but it set up the wrong mentality. So, I changed tactics and played a game with myself called "How Long Can I Go Without Smoking?"

        16+ years later, I still haven't lost that game. BUT...if for some reason I would have a cigaretter, I would have a benchmark to beat.

        All the best,
        Michael
        Nice game you've going on there, Michael!

        I'm sure you're winning that!



        Great posts, Warriors! Do not hesitate to share YOUR story also!


        Thanks, Mike.
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  • Profile picture of the author Patrician
    Just someone who is going to try to quit again - what I have learned -

    I actually switched to additive free cigarettes a few years ago, which are much more expensive and less harmful - as they say it is all the chemicals, not the tobacco that bites. They taste and smell even worse than regular cigs. I chain smoked these (1 pack plus per day)

    Then I got an electronic cigarette and it is one of those that supposes the addiction is nicotine - it delivers nicotine - MORE than the ultra light cigs I smoked - but no carbon monoxide (from the burning).

    It tastes beautiful, does not stink up your house and you do not burn everything and get ashes everywhere. It even has 'smoke' that is not really smoke but harmless vapors. It's really good. (US made www.puresmokeonline.com) (I get them cheaper at the Wholesale Cigarette Store - Carton is $15 vs $50 for cigs (after 1 time $45 device with USB charger).

    It took away the 'FIEND' (searching the garbage for butts if it is too late to go out) - I can go overnight without cigarettes because I have my electronic buddy.

    Swell. Why am I still craving cigarettes? I will tell you why - since I have eliminated ALL of the chemicals (except nicotine) now, it is that my body is addicted to carbon monoxide. That is the only difference between cig and electronic cig.

    Anything your body gets used to - creates an addiction.

    OK - now the plot thickens. I also chain drink coffee - strong home ground beans. I always figured well I will give up coffee because it goes with cigarettes but I will do that after.

    Guess what - the speed in the coffee makes me smoke more. So need to kick them both together - maybe just one cup in the morning - maybe not since I did not drink any since Saturday morning and have barely smoked because:

    Here is what is helping me now and what is working. I got very sick last Saturday and went to the emergency. They gave me this antibiotic that is very strong. It has made me so nauseated that I really can't smoke except between doses. Coffee also tastes really bad (tried some today).

    Now where do we get something that will make us nauseated so we won't smoke? I don't know and it is a horrible feeling but I guess not as horrible as lung cancer.

    I am going to run with this - I have 4 more days of these pills and a few more cigarettes in the house -

    Supporting this is the TERROR of being in the emergency hospital and realizing how health issues are no joke - real disease is PAINFUL and being in that environment with sick and maybe dying people is HORROR.

    I don't want to go there.

    Cigarettes are foul - all the way around - they taste and smell bad - they make your skin discolored and wrinkled on your face - Quit and you will see a difference in your face in days. (proven)

    = this is not to mention the real RISK of Lung Cancer, Emphysema, Heart Attacks, Strokes (in the emergency I talked to a lady whose daughter was in a wheel chair - from a heart attack she became paralyzed - yeh - don't think you necessarily have a heart attack and move on afterward back to normal.)

    It is no joke, Yo. We need to QUIT NOW!

    p.s. Thank you for this useful topic, hope this gives you some data, and I hope you do well with your report, Mike.
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    • Profile picture of the author Leather
      Originally Posted by Patrician View Post

      Just someone who is going to try to quit again - what I have learned -

      I actually switched to additive free cigarettes a few years ago, which are much more expensive and less harmful - as they say it is all the chemicals, not the tobacco that bites. They taste and smell even worse than regular cigs. I chain smoked these (1 pack plus per day)

      Then I got an electronic cigarette and it is one of those that supposes the addiction is nicotine - it delivers nicotine - MORE than the ultra light cigs I smoked - but no carbon monoxide (from the burning).

      It tastes beautiful, does not stink up your house and you do not burn everything and get ashes everywhere. It even has 'smoke' that is not really smoke but harmless vapors. It's really good. (US made www.puresmokeonline.com) (I get them cheaper at the Wholesale Cigarette Store - Carton is $15 vs $50 for cigs (after 1 time $45 device with USB charger).

      It took away the 'FIEND' (searching the garbage for butts if it is too late to go out) - I can go overnight without cigarettes because I have my electronic buddy.

      Swell. Why am I still craving cigarettes? I will tell you why - since I have eliminated ALL of the chemicals (except nicotine) now, it is that my body is addicted to carbon monoxide. That is the only difference between cig and electronic cig.

      Anything your body gets used to - creates an addiction.

      OK - now the plot thickens. I also chain drink coffee - strong home ground beans. I always figured well I will give up coffee because it goes with cigarettes but I will do that after.

      Guess what - the speed in the coffee makes me smoke more. So need to kick them both together - maybe just one cup in the morning - maybe not since I did not drink any since Saturday morning and have barely smoked because:

      Here is what is helping me now and what is working. I got very sick last Saturday and went to the emergency. They gave me this antibiotic that is very strong. It has made me so nauseated that I really can't smoke except between doses. Coffee also tastes really bad (tried some today).

      Now where do we get something that will make us nauseated so we won't smoke? I don't know and it is a horrible feeling but I guess not as horrible as lung cancer.

      I am going to run with this - I have 4 more days of these pills and a few more cigarettes in the house -

      Supporting this is the TERROR of being in the emergency hospital and realizing how health issues are no joke - real disease is PAINFUL and being in that environment with sick and maybe dying people is HORROR.

      I don't want to go there.

      Cigarettes are foul - all the way around - they taste and smell bad - they make your skin discolored and wrinkled on your face - Quit and you will see a difference in your face in days. (proven)

      = this is not to mention the real RISK of Lung Cancer, Emphysema, Heart Attacks, Strokes (in the emergency I talked to a lady whose daughter was in a wheel chair - from a heart attack she became paralyzed - yeh - don't think you necessarily have a heart attack and move on afterward back to normal.)

      It is no joke, Yo. We need to QUIT NOW!

      p.s. Thank you for this useful topic, hope this gives you some data, and I hope you do well with your report, Mike.

      Sucks when you have to get really sick to get the motivation to quit something bad, but i'm guilty of it too :/
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Oksa
    I never quit 16+ years ago, but I haven't smoked since then either.

    Huh?

    I had tried "quitting" several times before that, but it set up the wrong mentality. So, I changed tactics and played a game with myself called "How Long Can I Go Without Smoking?"

    16+ years later, I still haven't lost that game. BUT...if for some reason I would have a cigaretter, I would have a benchmark to beat.

    All the best,
    Michael
    Signature

    "Ich bin en fuego!"
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    • Profile picture of the author Sheryl Polomka
      Originally Posted by Michael Oksa View Post

      I never quit 16+ years ago, but I haven't smoked since then either.

      Huh?

      I had tried "quitting" several times before that, but it set up the wrong mentality. So, I changed tactics and played a game with myself called "How Long Can I Go Without Smoking?"

      16+ years later, I still haven't lost that game. BUT...if for some reason I would have a cigaretter, I would have a benchmark to beat.

      All the best,
      Michael
      Wow! I did the same thing - 10 years ago. I did gradually cut down in strength and the amount I smoked and I wasn't really enjoying them anymore. It wasn't too hard cutting down the number of smokes I had a day when my husband was at work but it was harder on the weekends when he was home and smoking.

      One week I was doing really good and when it came to the weekend I worried that I would smoke too many again. So I got up on the Saturday morning and said to myself 'I'll just see how long I can go without one' and that was 10 years ago.

      My husband still smoked and has just given up in March this year (for the 100th time) but he's doing well this time so I hope this is it for him. I tried many times to give up and failed, my Father-in-law (ex smoker) kept telling me it was because I wasn't really ready to give up and that would make me really angry because I was trying and I really did think I was ready. It wasn't until I gave up that I knew what he meant by me not really being ready - when I finally gave up I was REALLY READY!

      I don't crave cigarettes and haven't done since I stopped. I'm not a reformed smoker that can't stand the smell - in fact I actually like the smell of cigarette smoke and every now and then enjoy when I walk past someone smoking and get that wif of smoke smell
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  • Profile picture of the author Swine43
    Hey AFI,

    Sorry I can't PM you back yet because I my post count is too low at the moment.

    But what comes to your question I need any kind of info you'd like to share about quit smoking.

    What have been more difficult than you thought or maybe easier?

    Everything what you have in your mind is VERY useful! It might be the THING someone else needs in order to quit smoking!

    Thanks, Mike.
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  • Profile picture of the author Swine43
    Hey all,

    Really quick bump here.

    Please share your thoughts about quitting smoking!

    I'm sure there are few bad habiters still here...

    Thanks, Mike.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dennis Gaskill
    I started smoking when I was twelve. I was up to two packs of Camels a day 15 years later and one day I decided I'd had enough of the coughing. I crumpled almost a full pack, tossed 'em in the garbage and never looked back. The first few days were hard but after that I knew I'd won.

    Mind over matter.
    Signature

    Just when you think you've got it all figured out, someone changes the rules.

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  • Profile picture of the author cindybidar
    I've quit (successfully) twice. Once for three years, the second time for five and counting. Or maybe that's just one success.

    I'm a firm believer in cold turkey, and in playing little mind games like Michael did. I would imagine myself walking into a restaurant and asking for a NON-smoking table (back when you could still smoke in restaurants) and telling people not that I quit, but that I DON'T SMOKE. That subtle difference worked for me. I also took great pride in the number of days/weeks/months it had been since I last had a cigarette.

    I have smoked on a couple of occasions since I formally quit, and it honestly made me sick. I could taste it for hours later, and found it truly disgusting.

    I think it also helps to live and work in a place where smoking is really looked down upon. Here in the States, it's more and more difficult to find anyplace you're even allowed to smoke. Many businesses even require that you leave the premises - not just the building - before lighting up.
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    • Profile picture of the author Ride_the_lightning
      Banned
      [DELETED]
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      • Profile picture of the author Swine43
        Originally Posted by Dennis Gaskill View Post

        I started smoking when I was twelve. I was up to two packs of Camels a day 15 years later and one day I decided I'd had enough of the coughing. I crumpled almost a full pack, tossed 'em in the garbage and never looked back. The first few days were hard but after that I knew I'd won.

        Mind over matter.
        Why people do it more complicated than it actually is? Great stuff!

        Originally Posted by cindybidar View Post

        I've quit (successfully) twice. Once for three years, the second time for five and counting. Or maybe that's just one success.

        I'm a firm believer in cold turkey, and in playing little mind games like Michael did. I would imagine myself walking into a restaurant and asking for a NON-smoking table (back when you could still smoke in restaurants) and telling people not that I quit, but that I DON'T SMOKE. That subtle difference worked for me. I also took great pride in the number of days/weeks/months it had been since I last had a cigarette.

        I have smoked on a couple of occasions since I formally quit, and it honestly made me sick. I could taste it for hours later, and found it truly disgusting.

        I think it also helps to live and work in a place where smoking is really looked down upon. Here in the States, it's more and more difficult to find anyplace you're even allowed to smoke. Many businesses even require that you leave the premises - not just the building - before lighting up.
        I think that's a one big successful quit! Congrats!

        Originally Posted by Ride_the_lightning View Post

        Mark Twain was telling about to quit smocking is very simple - thousands times was quiting
        Haha, very clever!

        Thanks to everybody for posting these stories!

        Keep posting!

        Thanks, Mike.
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  • Profile picture of the author Amsterdam
    I'm approaching my fifth year of not smoking after a 20 a day habit lasting over 23 years. When I quit I kept a blog detailing my thoughts and actions from day to day. You can read it at Help Me Quit Smoking

    T
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    • Profile picture of the author Swine43
      Originally Posted by QuickSurf View Post

      I know people that were heavy smokers, both cigs and cigars... and they actually started using those electric cigs (a friend sells them) and they quit cold turkey.
      Hey there! Nice to hear that e cigarettes have some success! Even though I personally don't like the idea of switching bad thing to another (smoke->nicotine). But at least electronic cigarette is best of a bad lot!

      Originally Posted by Amsterdam View Post

      I'm approaching my fifth year of not smoking after a 20 a day habit lasting over 23 years. When I quit I kept a blog detailing my thoughts and actions from day to day. You can read it at Help Me Quit Smoking

      T
      Wonderful blog you have there! Congrats to your five smoke-free years!

      Thanks to everybody for writing your comments and feel free to post more stories!

      Sincerely, Mike.
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  • Profile picture of the author Swine43
    Hey everyone,

    little bump here! IF someone still have quit smoking story to share, please do!

    Some people could need that advice like there's no tomorrow...

    Thanks in advance, Mike
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  • Profile picture of the author Patrician
    With the new announcement that cigarette companies are considering putting pictures of diseased lungs and corpses on cigarette packs, I was like 'eh'.

    But it was good 'aversion therapy' to go and look at them when I found a link to the video. Pretty scary and sickening.

    Felt guilty smoking all day but I guess they need to be more graphic to really hit it though as far as a hard-core addict like me.

    I have had no problem cutting down on coffee to 1 cup a day - just replacing other cups with herbal teas, hot water and lemon juice, etc.

    However it hasn't yet hit me in the cut down on smoking department as per my theory above that coffee speed makes me smoke more.

    A comment on the having a carton in the closet theory - there is something to that feeling when you run out - this is where the 'desperation' (fiend) plays in. Definitely will think about that. Thanks.

    However conversely when I buy a carton, I smoke more. The only thing that forces me to limit myself to 1 pack is to buy 1 pack at a time. This makes it very inconvenient to go to the store every day -

    So it does limit me at least to no more than 1 pack (20) per day which is something at least.

    (before I had the e-cig I would go out at any hour just to have cigs in the house even to go to sleep).

    I am not doing very well quitting AGAIN and I am afraid I need to be physically restrained but can't afford Betty Ford LOL.

    oh. yeh - p.sss - my friend quit years ago by using something callied the Schick Clinic - it worked permanently and uses two kinds of Aversion Therapy.

    Aversion #1 you go to a room full of dirty ash trays and just reeking of stale smoke. You are forced to smoke one whole pack of cigarettes one after the other for however long this takes you.

    Aversion #2 you have paid $700 to go there - so theory is you won't want to waste your money.

    As I said it did work for him - but again whatever you do you just have to MAKE UP YOUR MIND TO DO IT - I guess that is my problem - I must have two minds. (one smokes and can't stop, the other hates it)
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  • Profile picture of the author KimW
    I quit when I saw the very real correlation between smoking and my high blood pressure.
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    • Profile picture of the author Swine43
      Originally Posted by Patrician View Post

      With the new announcement that cigarette companies are considering putting pictures of diseased lungs and corpses on cigarette packs, I was like 'eh'.

      But it was good 'aversion therapy' to go and look at them when I found a link to the video. Pretty scary and sickening.

      Felt guilty smoking all day but I guess they need to be more graphic to really hit it though as far as a hard-core addict like me.

      I have had no problem cutting down on coffee to 1 cup a day - just replacing other cups with herbal teas, hot water and lemon juice, etc.

      However it hasn't yet hit me in the cut down on smoking department as per my theory above that coffee speed makes me smoke more.

      A comment on the having a carton in the closet theory - there is something to that feeling when you run out - this is where the 'desperation' (fiend) plays in. Definitely will think about that. Thanks.

      However conversely when I buy a carton, I smoke more. The only thing that forces me to limit myself to 1 pack is to buy 1 pack at a time. This makes it very inconvenient to go to the store every day -

      So it does limit me at least to no more than 1 pack (20) per day which is something at least.

      (before I had the e-cig I would go out at any hour just to have cigs in the house even to go to sleep).

      I am not doing very well quitting AGAIN and I am afraid I need to be physically restrained but can't afford Betty Ford LOL.

      oh. yeh - p.sss - my friend quit years ago by using something callied the Schick Clinic - it worked permanently and uses two kinds of Aversion Therapy.

      Aversion #1 you go to a room full of dirty ash trays and just reeking of stale smoke. You are forced to smoke one whole pack of cigarettes one after the other for however long this takes you.

      Aversion #2 you have paid $700 to go there - so theory is you won't want to waste your money.

      As I said it did work for him - but again whatever you do you just have to MAKE UP YOUR MIND TO DO IT - I guess that is my problem - I must have two minds. (one smokes and can't stop, the other hates it)
      Thanks for sharing your story, Patricia! The Schick Clinic method is new to me and to be honest it doesn't feel so good method - but at least your friend quit smoking because of it...

      Originally Posted by KimW View Post

      I quit when I saw the very real correlation between smoking and my high blood pressure.
      You got the fact and made the conclusion about it. So simple! Hopefully you've gotten your blood pressure under control.

      Thanks everybody for sharing these posts with all of us!

      Thanks, Mike.
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      • Profile picture of the author sans
        I was talking to my friend about how I am struggling to stay off the smokes, and she told me she gave up by disassociation she explained that she noted when she craved a smoke most that was when she woke up had a coffee and a smoke and after a meal also with a coffee

        So she changed her morning coffee for juice and had a coffee later then after her meal she got up and did the dishes and waited for as long as she could before lighting up.

        Coffee seems to be a trigger for many people so maybe it would be good to change the times of your coffee breaks.
        Check what your triggers are and try to avoid them or change the times of when you usually have them.

        Try a drink of water when the craving comes on or do something that takes your mind off it or makes it too hard to smoke like a swim a soak in the bath or take up a hobby.

        I am trying to give up the coffee but its hard as I hate tea and like to have a hot drink now and then and hot chocolate is a bit too filling for me.

        I hope these ideas help.

        Sandra non smoker for nearly four months
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        • Profile picture of the author Swine43
          Originally Posted by sans View Post

          I was talking to my friend about how I am struggling to stay off the smokes, and she told me she gave up by disassociation she explained that she noted when she craved a smoke most that was when she woke up had a coffee and a smoke and after a meal also with a coffee

          So she changed her morning coffee for juice and had a coffee later then after her meal she got up and did the dishes and waited for as long as she could before lighting up.

          Coffee seems to be a trigger for many people so maybe it would be good to change the times of your coffee breaks.
          Check what your triggers are and try to avoid them or change the times of when you usually have them.

          Try a drink of water when the craving comes on or do something that takes your mind off it or makes it too hard to smoke like a swim a soak in the bath or take up a hobby.

          I am trying to give up the coffee but its hard as I hate tea and like to have a hot drink now and then and hot chocolate is a bit too filling for me.

          I hope these ideas help.

          Sandra non smoker for nearly four months
          Congratulations, Sandra, to your four smokefree months! Thank you also for sharing your tips! I'm sure people will benefit from those.

          Please continue giving your thoughts!

          Thanks, Mike.
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  • Profile picture of the author mistermint
    I started smoking when I was twelve. I was up to two packs of Camels a day 15 years later and one day I decided I'd had enough of the coughing. I crumpled almost a full pack, tossed 'em in the garbage and never looked back. The first few days were hard but after that I knew I'd won.

    Mind over matter.
    Thats amazing..

    Some days I really feel I want to quit but, the addiction stays with me and I find myself looking for the packet...

    Admire anyone who bites the bullet and quits but folks...cut us smokers some slack and don't be so intollerant to us hopeless cases...

    I enjoy smoking really...though here in UK they are about 10 bucks a pack..guess that's reason enough to quit..

    Plus, if I don't smoke I eat everything in site...oops sight lol

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  • Profile picture of the author raradra
    I smoked for 17 years and quit 6 years ago this past August 19th. I used a patch to quit as my willpower back then left a lot to be desired. My husband quit with me so our house was unlivable for a few days

    For me it was health reasons. I'm an asthmatic who was dumb enough to smoke anyway. My grandpa died from emphysema and a year later my mom was diagnosed with emphysema and COPD and I realized that if I didn't quit, I wouldn't have a prayer of escaping their fate.

    I watched my grandpa die. Every single breath was excruciating for him. He said it felt like he was drowning slowly, and he could barely speak 2 or 3 words before coughing from over exertion. It was awful.

    My mom grows worse every day, but I have so far at least escaped her fate. My pulmonary doctor tells me that in another 3 or 4 years of not smoking, my lungs will return to almost what they where before I began.

    I got lucky. My husband loved me enough to quit with me. He could have just chosen to smoke outside but it would have made it much harder for me smelling the stench of smoke on him. It's disgusting to me now, that stench. Every time I get near a smoker I can smell it in their clothes, their hair. It's gross, like a dirty ashtray. I'm glad it's no longer me.

    Took me 4 days to get past the cravings when I quit but I stayed on the patch for 10 days. My husband quit cold turkey and hasn't been at all tempted after the first day. I almost relapsed twice in 6 years from major stress/money issues but stayed the course and am happy for it. Haven't even thought of relapse in a few years now.

    Best thing I ever did was quit.
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    • Profile picture of the author Sheryl Polomka
      Originally Posted by raradra View Post

      I smoked for 17 years and quit 6 years ago this past August 19th. I used a patch to quit as my willpower back then left a lot to be desired. My husband quit with me so our house was unlivable for a few days
      Oh wow - I quite on August 19th too but 10 years ago. August 19th 2000
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  • Profile picture of the author kidsshadow
    i 'm not smoking dude, but i want to support other people to quit smoking.
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  • Profile picture of the author Swine43
    Hey everybody,

    Great posts shared here! I want to thank everybody once again because you people have participated in this conversation which might be the one single most important issue to someone who try to quit smoking!

    And now, let's all laugh together to this famous quote ...

    Oscar Wilde: 'Do you mind if I smoke?' Sarah Bernhardt: 'I don't care if you burn'

    (yeah, this quote has inspired me a lot )

    Thanks, Mike.
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  • Profile picture of the author Shane Dolby
    Me and My wife both decided 3 years ago to quit smoking as we was moving to a new place and knew there would be no smoke smell. we dried cleaned all our cloths to get the smell out.

    We than started using chantix and 3 months later was done with cigs. Saved alot of money over 200 a month


    Shane
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  • Profile picture of the author Swine43
    Hey everybody,

    a little bump here.

    If you find this thread helpful, just please here your thoughts and stories!

    Thanks in advance, Mike.
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  • Profile picture of the author pgesystems
    Hey.

    I quit after 20 years of smoking.. finally. Had tried a few times before, but never for very long. Guess this time I really wanted to quit.. cause it's been over 2 years .. and still no cravings
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  • Profile picture of the author dagaul101
    Having something to work the gums with always helps, be it a bubble gum, or just candy
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    • Profile picture of the author Apollo77
      I'm actually in the process of quiting right now, but find it very hard. I think it's because I spend so much time at my computer, I just need that break from typing or whatever, so I stop and light up.

      Trying a new tactic now, every time I feel the urge, I stick a piece of gum or a mint in my mouth, sometimes even have a veggie tray with dip on my desk to munch on.

      For most people I think it's the actual motion of putting something in your mouth and having something in your hand, so I am trying to substitute that for anything else, even tooth picks, or chewing on a straw (my uncle did that and he was successful at quitting).

      So far so good, I have managed to stop smoking all together except when I first wake and after SOME meals.
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      • Profile picture of the author Swine43
        Originally Posted by pgesystems View Post

        Hey.

        I quit after 20 years of smoking.. finally. Had tried a few times before, but never for very long. Guess this time I really wanted to quit.. cause it's been over 2 years .. and still no cravings
        Congrats to your smoke free two years!

        Originally Posted by dagaul101 View Post

        Having something to work the gums with always helps, be it a bubble gum, or just candy
        Some people find it easy to substitute a bad habit with a better habit!

        Originally Posted by Apollo77 View Post

        I'm actually in the process of quiting right now, but find it very hard. I think it's because I spend so much time at my computer, I just need that break from typing or whatever, so I stop and light up.

        Trying a new tactic now, every time I feel the urge, I stick a piece of gum or a mint in my mouth, sometimes even have a veggie tray with dip on my desk to munch on.

        For most people I think it's the actual motion of putting something in your mouth and having something in your hand, so I am trying to substitute that for anything else, even tooth picks, or chewing on a straw (my uncle did that and he was successful at quitting).

        So far so good, I have managed to stop smoking all together except when I first wake and after SOME meals.
        Nice, easy tactics you shared there! Thanks a lot!

        Cheers to everybody who have shared their thoughts and tips! Please continue posting!

        Thanks, Mike.
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        • Profile picture of the author sans
          For those heavy smokers that smoke full strength
          I advise not to go to a lighter strength as it will feel like you are sucking on a straw
          it makes you 1) suck harder 2) smoke more as you are not satisfied.

          The best thing to do is just try smoke less of the ones you normally smoke
          As suggested by others make a game of how long you can go without.

          I found cutting down did not work for me it had to be all or nothing as I mentioned
          I used ziban from my Doctor I got two week supply then another two weeks of lower dose
          The first week I smoked normal the next week I realized I was not smoking so much
          third week not at all and did not even notice I had quit.

          But once I had stopped the ziban I did start getting cravings again but was able to get my mind off it a lot easier.

          Four months and a few days now and I am still doing well.

          Here is a funny story, the other day I was a bit stressed and I opened the cupboard and started yelling "YOU ARE NOT GOING TO CONTROL ME I WILL NOT GIVE IN"
          My husband said who's in there? I yelled back "THE CARTON OF SMOKES"
          He quickly made his escape into the yard.

          Yes having the carton in there really helps.
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          • Profile picture of the author Swine43
            Originally Posted by sans View Post

            For those heavy smokers that smoke full strength
            I advise not to go to a lighter strength as it will feel like you are sucking on a straw
            it makes you 1) suck harder 2) smoke more as you are not satisfied.

            The best thing to do is just try smoke less of the ones you normally smoke
            As suggested by others make a game of how long you can go without.

            I found cutting down did not work for me it had to be all or nothing as I mentioned
            I used ziban from my Doctor I got two week supply then another two weeks of lower dose
            The first week I smoked normal the next week I realized I was not smoking so much
            third week not at all and did not even notice I had quit.

            But once I had stopped the ziban I did start getting cravings again but was able to get my mind off it a lot easier.

            Four months and a few days now and I am still doing well.

            Here is a funny story, the other day I was a bit stressed and I opened the cupboard and started yelling "YOU ARE NOT GOING TO CONTROL ME I WILL NOT GIVE IN"
            My husband said who's in there? I yelled back "THE CARTON OF SMOKES"
            He quickly made his escape into the yard.

            Yes having the carton in there really helps.
            Haha, hopefully your husband has recovered from the shock already!

            Nice to hear that ziban worked for you! I've read different things about it, though.

            Thanks, Mike.
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            • Profile picture of the author Swine43
              Hey everybody,

              a little bump here.

              If you found anything in this thread helpful, please share here your thoughts and stories!

              Thanks in advance, Mike.
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              • Profile picture of the author Adam1981
                I quit smoking about a year ago, the only problem I had was that my appetite went crazy, I was hungry all the time, must have put on about 3st. Took a while to slim down again. Eventually solved that problem by sucking low sugar lollipops whenever I felt the need.

                The actual quitting I found quite easy, my method was...

                1. Switch to the cheapest, nastiest brand of menthol cigarettes I could find, simply because I hate the things and didn't want to smoke them as much.

                2. Started with my daily limit of 20 cigs, each week I would decrease my daily limit by 1. By weening myself off over a long time period, I didn't get serious cravings or a short temper.

                Pretty much all there was to it. I can't say I don't smoke at all, I tend to have a few when out drinking (a lot of my friends smoke so it's hard not to) but other than that I don't touch them.
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  • Profile picture of the author success4all
    I want to share something not as a smoker or quitter. But as a person who helped a few of my friends and students quit, even after trying to quit many times and many methods and failed.

    Two big lies that keep most smokers from quitting are:

    1. Quitting is hard

    2. You need strong willpower to quit.

    you will not be able to quit until you get rid of those two lies.

    The tobacco industry and quit smoking gurus would love you to belief the first one, so you remain a smoker. If you are not really committed to quiting, that is a great excuse.

    Willpower is the last thing you can expect from a smoker.

    As long as a person belief in these two lies he will not be able to quit. The moment he is able to change his belief system, quitting will be effortless and automatic.
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    • Profile picture of the author Swine43
      Originally Posted by Adam1981 View Post

      I quit smoking about a year ago, the only problem I had was that my appetite went crazy, I was hungry all the time, must have put on about 3st. Took a while to slim down again. Eventually solved that problem by sucking low sugar lollipops whenever I felt the need.

      The actual quitting I found quite easy, my method was...

      1. Switch to the cheapest, nastiest brand of menthol cigarettes I could find, simply because I hate the things and didn't want to smoke them as much.

      2. Started with my daily limit of 20 cigs, each week I would decrease my daily limit by 1. By weening myself off over a long time period, I didn't get serious cravings or a short temper.

      Pretty much all there was to it. I can't say I don't smoke at all, I tend to have a few when out drinking (a lot of my friends smoke so it's hard not to) but other than that I don't touch them.
      You've done a long path where you are now. You can easily become entirely non-smoker if you just want to!

      Originally Posted by success4all View Post

      I want to share something not as a smoker or quitter. But as a person who helped a few of my friends and students quit, even after trying to quit many times and many methods and failed.

      Two big lies that keep most smokers from quitting are:

      1. Quitting is hard

      2. You need strong willpower to quit.

      you will not be able to quit until you get rid of those two lies.

      The tobacco industry and quit smoking gurus would love you to belief the first one, so you remain a smoker. If you are not really committed to quiting, that is a great excuse.

      Willpower is the last thing you can expect from a smoker.

      As long as a person belief in these two lies he will not be able to quit. The moment he is able to change his belief system, quitting will be effortless and automatic.
      That's so true! People are afraid of quit smoking and don't know how change that mindset. But it's easy, you just have to know how to do it!
      Great post!

      Big thanks to everyone who have written their thoughts here! Please keep this thread alive because someone can use this information like there's no tomorrow!

      Thanks, Mike.
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  • Profile picture of the author BP72
    For me... currently trying to quit smoking again.. it is addiction as well as routine.

    I have for years woke up, made coffee, brushed teeth, put on a robe and sat on the porch for a smoke and coffee to start the day. Before presentations i would take my notes, go outside and review them while having a smoke. It has been consistent behavior for years.

    I have now resorted to going to a doctor to help because i have failed so many times before. The first thing he is having me do is work on not smoking first thing in the morning. So far so good. The more i get used to not starting off the day like the way i have for years the easier it is to cut down through the day.

    I am now down to about 6 cigarettes a day (from 2 packs) and taking Bupropion for mood swings. I havent snapped on anyone and although drawn out, I really feel like this time i will be done. I still do catch myself reaching in my pocket for smokes first thing in the morning but it is more of just being used to doing it not really the desire to have a smoke.
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    • Profile picture of the author Swine43
      Originally Posted by BP72 View Post

      For me... currently trying to quit smoking again.. it is addiction as well as routine.

      I have for years woke up, made coffee, brushed teeth, put on a robe and sat on the porch for a smoke and coffee to start the day. Before presentations i would take my notes, go outside and review them while having a smoke. It has been consistent behavior for years.

      I have now resorted to going to a doctor to help because i have failed so many times before. The first thing he is having me do is work on not smoking first thing in the morning. So far so good. The more i get used to not starting off the day like the way i have for years the easier it is to cut down through the day.

      I am now down to about 6 cigarettes a day (from 2 packs) and taking Bupropion for mood swings. I havent snapped on anyone and although drawn out, I really feel like this time i will be done. I still do catch myself reaching in my pocket for smokes first thing in the morning but it is more of just being used to doing it not really the desire to have a smoke.
      I wish you luck in your battle! You're going to win it, I'm sure.

      Thanks everybody for posting this thread. Please continue doing it!

      I'm in the middle of writing this ebook I mentioned in OP.

      Thanks, Mike.
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  • I've tried many times over the years to stop, but could never get it to stick, so I decided to try one of the electronic cigarettes, instead. I've been smoking it exclusively since February of last year, and haven't had a 'real' cigarette since. It still provides the nicotine, but at least the 1500 other carcinogens from the smoke are taken out.

    So technically I guess I still haven't 'quit' smoking, but at least I found a healthier alternative.

    A quick explanation of how they work:

    http://ecigs-today.com/?p=11
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  • Profile picture of the author Pauline60
    I gave up smoking 27 years ago. I had numerous attempts which failed because I was trying to make myself want to give up. Then I got to a point where i really did want to give up because I found something more important to me and it was amazingly easy. I didn't crave at all, I just didn't want to smoke any more and I never did.

    Really wanting to is the key.
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  • Profile picture of the author lavfely12
    Thanks for proactive invitation. I'm with you too.
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  • Profile picture of the author focused
    A friend smoked 2 - 3 packs of cigarettes a day for decades.

    But when the price per pack hit a certain point he felt was not acceptable, he simply stopped smoking from then on.

    And it was no problem at all to do so.
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  • Profile picture of the author Vince-the-prince
    Just an update ...

    I have not smoked for at least 36 years. I no longer crave for a cigarette and feel repulsed by the fumes of cigarettes. It has also become apparent at how unsocial it is to smoke in the company of others as demonstrated by the smell going past "smoking posts" provided by employers for smoking staff to have their smoke breaks.
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