Do List Owners Have A Clue About Some Of The Garbage They Promote?

21 replies
  • OFF TOPIC
  • |
I do not have a list so I'd really appreciate the prespective of those who do have one. I belong to about nine lists and am generally quite selective as to who I sign up to follow.

I've been on one list for about five weeks now and for the most part the newsletter and free information he sends out is of good quality. However the past few weeks he's pitched three products and after doing some research on this forum as well as a few others have realized that the products are total crap. I've emailed him about this but no response.

My question is I wonder how many list owners do the leg work and research needed to properly decide if a product is worth promoting or not? I also wonder if they realize that their IM branding image/ trustworthiness can be affected by sending out these types of products?
#clue #garbage #im branding #image #list #list owners #owners #products #promote
  • Profile picture of the author ronywilliam
    i think the list owners just see what the size of the other guys list is before promoting there product so that they can exchange emails later with them about there own product. Its best to research about a product before buying in like in any other thing!
    Signature

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3312149].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Caleb Spilchen
    hey freemen,

    That`s one of those things that really bothers me, is when people don't even research the products they promote. Before I ever promote anything, I either read it and purchase it myself, or I talk to one of my marketing friends who has purchased it. Needless to say, if nobody I know can give it a recommendation, that I trust.. Then I'll buy it, and make sure its good before I think of promoting.

    It's sad that people don't realize what you do now, your customers will always remember.

    Caleb
    Signature

    Canadian Expat Living in Medellin, Colombia

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3312164].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author freemen14
      Originally Posted by Caleb Spilchen View Post

      hey freemen,

      That`s one of those things that really bothers me, is when people don't even research the products they promote. Before I ever promote anything, I either read it and purchase it myself, or I talk to one of my marketing friends who has purchased it. Needless to say, if nobody I know can give it a recommendation, that I trust.. Then I'll buy it, and make sure its good before I think of promoting.

      It's sad that people don't realize what you do now, your customers will always remember.

      Caleb

      hey Caleb. Your method is a good way to go about things.

      I think list owners should value the quality of the products they promote as much as they value the free informtion/ content they provide.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3312223].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Brian Mullis
        Quite frankly, many list owners do know they are promoting, let's just say 'less than worthwhile' products but it makes them money so they keep doing it. Also, one of the problems is the way they go about doing ad swaps. They promote their "friend's" products as a favor for them promoting their own products. They don't necessarily believe in the "friend's" products but they are simply repaying a favor.

        Not a very good way to build trust with your list.

        Brian
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3312242].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author freemen14
          Follow Up. To the list owners credit I did get a good email response back this afternoon.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3312413].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author Zeus66
            Originally Posted by freemen14 View Post

            Follow Up. To the list owners credit I did get a good email response back this afternoon.
            ATTN LIST OWNERS! Take this to heart and put it into practice. Even if you screw up and send a dud to your list, you can salvage some of the relationships by simply responding when someone on your list calls you out. Mea culpa = damage control. Don't ignore them... or do, and watch them drop off and think even less of you.
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3312440].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Fazal Mayar
    You really need to know what you are promoting. People are so lazy, I mean, researching if a product or good or not isnt rocket science. You can search on WF forums in the product reviews section.
    Signature

    Blogger at RicherOrNot.com (Make Money online blog but also promoting ethical internet marketing)

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3312175].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author PhoebeSmellyCat
    I'm sure there are. I am on a handful of lists that send me quality info.

    Once in a while they will send a product they're promoting, but they actually used the product. They write about how the product helped them and give examples.

    I have also been on lists where the owner sends 5 to 8 emails daily just to promote the 'next shiny new thing'. No review, no examples. Just, "Hey, take a look at this super duper money maker!"

    It usually goes to a video squeeze page that has the '58734 exit pop ups virus'.

    I unsubscribe immediately.
    Signature
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3312179].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Jake Gray
    If they get paid, they seem to not care what they are promoting. Downside of someone renting out their list. I'd much rather be on someones list who would connect with their users instead of spam them with worthless emails.

    Jake
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3312187].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Mike Nikolz
    Great point! It amazes me how many junk people promote. They would be ashamed if they only read their own stuff )))
    Signature

    .

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3312190].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author mikemcmillan
    Hey Freemen,
    I do understand exactly with what you are saying. But there is another side to the issue as well. The big guys, the big super-affiliates, especially in the IM niche have a substantially different business model than the meat-and-potato type affiliate marketer out there.

    Sure, I would much rather get emails in which information of value is given and products of value are promoted. And at a certain level that business model can work. But to play ball with the big boys that model has limitations.

    The fastest way to get into the "inner circle" is to create a product of your own and orchestrate a major product launch that brings in a fair number of super-affiliates to promote for you. This can not only bring in substantial sales, but it can grow your list by opting in 10,000 names or more--maybe many more from the opt-in form on your sales page.

    Once you have a substantial list you can then make the leader boards for the big product launches yourself. Now you're a player.

    If you watch the JV announcements on the major JV forums you will frequently see people launching their first product. A common thing they mention is, "If you promote for me, I will definitely be their for your next launch."

    If you go into a product launch of your own and announce on one of the major JV forums, "I really want you guys to promote for me. However, most of you guys sell nothing but sh*t, so even though you make me a ton of money and grow me a huge list by promoting for me on my launch day--I won't be promoting for any of you when you launch again" you just doomed yourself.

    How far will that get you? You see, the business model for the real players is simply different than it is for the average affiliate marketer. It's not that their business model is right or wrong, it's just different.

    Look at it this way. Suppose you are struggling to make ends meet. Bills are past due, kids need money for college, an aging parent needs care and financial attention and you come to these people saying, "I understand I am not able to help and I'm sorry about our financial situation, but the thing I have going for me is that I have a list of 5,000 very loyal subscribers who think the world of me--they love my mailings to them."

    Or, alternatively, you have the option of engineering major product launches of your own, playing ball with the big boys using the business model required to play in their ball park, and being able to hit the button every day and bring in $1,000 a day or more mailing what some call "junk offers" to your list promoting products of the "inner circle" guys.

    Would you be willing to sacrifice the "buy a dozen products, research them, and promote only the best to my list" business model, in order to generate a high six figure income and be a better provider for those who depend on you? Are you sure?

    Imagine you had stockholders, investors in your affiliate marketing business. Some of the big guys do. At the annual stockholders meeting you get up and say, "The bad news is that I was only able to provide you with an annual 2.4% return on your investment, but the good news is that I have a great relationship with my list."

    Or, would you rather be able to stand up and say, "While the unsubscribe rate from my list is a tad bit higher than I would like, I am happy to report that your annual rate of return on your investment is right at 34% which I believe you will be happy with."

    Capitalism has, at its foundation, the ability to raise capital, either private or institutional. Incumbent in the ability to raise capital is the ability to provide investors with a decent rate of return on their investment. For the most part, investors don't care how that return was generated, only on the fact it was there.

    What I am suggesting is that people reverse engineer their business model beginning with the lifestyle they hope to achieve and working back to finding the model that can allocate that lifestyle to them.

    So again, I agree with what you are saying Freemen14, in a perfect world it would be great to get only emails providing in-depth, honest analyses of high quality products, but it is not a perfect Utopian world. There are different business models, each with the capacity to generate different returns on investment.

    The model you choose depends, to a large extent on the level of earnings you want to generate. Neither model is better than the other; They are just different.

    My Best--Mike
    Signature

    I'll help you create a reputation-building evergreen product in any niche and launch it successfully!
    Check it out here.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3312579].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author freemen14
      Originally Posted by mikemcmillan View Post

      Hey Freemen,
      I do understand exactly with what you are saying. But there is another side to the issue as well. The big guys, the big super-affiliates, especially in the IM niche have a substantially different business model than the meat-and-potato type affiliate marketer out there.

      Sure, I would much rather get emails in which information of value is given and products of value are promoted. And at a certain level that business model can work. But to play ball with the big boys that model has limitations.

      The fastest way to get into the "inner circle" is to create a product of your own and orchestrate a major product launch that brings in a fair number of super-affiliates to promote for you. This can not only bring in substantial sales, but it can grow your list by opting in 10,000 names or more--maybe many more from the opt-in form on your sales page.

      Once you have a substantial list you can then make the leader boards for the big product launches yourself. Now you're a player.

      If you watch the JV announcements on the major JV forums you will frequently see people launching their first product. A common thing they mention is, "If you promote for me, I will definitely be their for your next launch."

      If you go into a product launch of your own and announce on one of the major JV forums, "I really want you guys to promote for me. However, most of you guys sell nothing but sh*t, so even though you make me a ton of money and grow me a huge list by promoting for me on my launch day--I won't be promoting for any of you when you launch again" you just doomed yourself.

      How far will that get you? You see, the business model for the real players is simply different than it is for the average affiliate marketer. It's not that their business model is right or wrong, it's just different.

      Look at it this way. Suppose you are struggling to make ends meet. Bills are past due, kids need money for college, an aging parent needs care and financial attention and you come to these people saying, "I understand I am not able to help and I'm sorry about our financial situation, but the thing I have going for me is that I have a list of 5,000 very loyal subscribers who think the world of me--they love my mailings to them."

      Or, alternatively, you have the option of engineering major product launches of your own, playing ball with the big boys using the business model required to play in their ball park, and being able to hit the button every day and bring in $1,000 a day or more mailing what some call "junk offers" to your list promoting products of the "inner circle" guys.

      Would you be willing to sacrifice the "buy a dozen products, research them, and promote only the best to my list" business model, in order to generate a high six figure income and be a better provider for those who depend on you? Are you sure?

      Imagine you had stockholders, investors in your affiliate marketing business. Some of the big guys do. At the annual stockholders meeting you get up and say, "The bad news is that I was only able to provide you with an annual 2.4% return on your investment, but the good news is that I have a great relationship with my list."

      Or, would you rather be able to stand up and say, "While the unsubscribe rate from my list is a tad bit higher than I would like, I am happy to report that your annual rate of return on your investment is right at 34% which I believe you will be happy with."

      Capitalism has, at its foundation, the ability to raise capital, either private or institutional. Incumbent in the ability to raise capital is the ability to provide investors with a decent rate of return on their investment. For the most part, investors don't care how that return was generated, only on the fact it was there.

      What I am suggesting is that people reverse engineer their business model beginning with the lifestyle they hope to achieve and working back to finding the model that can allocate that lifestyle to them.

      So again, I agree with what you are saying Freemen14, in a perfect world it would be great to get only emails providing in-depth, honest analyses of high quality products, but it is not a perfect Utopian world. There are different business models, each with the capacity to generate different returns on investment.

      The model you choose depends, to a large extent on the level of earnings you want to generate. Neither model is better than the other; They are just different.

      My Best--Mike
      Mike.

      Thank you for your take. As I mentioned in my first post I was looking for perspective and I totally understand your take and found it to be very insightful as to how the "big boys" roll. I guess for some it comes down to a numbers game. Never even thought about that.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3312641].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author J Bold
    Perhaps these are product launches they are promoting and so they have no real idea about the product, yet, just promoting a product launch as they went to one of the JV sites and saw what big products were coming up in the future and just wanted to get in on the action. Or, there's a product that has sold well so they join up but don't care if it's a good product or not, just that it sells well.

    Not saying its excusable but you asked, so there's some possible reasons.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3312687].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author johninmn
    Great post Mike, thanks for the insight. Along those lines, a couple of weeks ago I got an email from Adam Horowitz (Mr. Mobile Monopoly) saying he was doing a webinar with Eben Pagan. Now I won't make any public comments about what I think of Adam's product but it's very similar to what most people say on WF. I have not purchased any of Eben's products, but I have seen some of his videos on Youtube and I understand why many people here think highly of him. So Adam was promoting Eben's new product, which is fine because I believe it must be a good product. But does this mean that Eben is going to have to promote Adam's next product? Do you think that by partnering with Adam that some might view Eben in a lesser light? I'm a newbie so I'm curious for your input. Thanks.
    Signature

    mobile mobile mobile mobile etc....

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3312690].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author mikemcmillan
      No, it's not a contractual kind of thing. No one has to promote every new launch coming out. But you will find Adam's name on the leaderboard for a lot of launches. He's very good at what he does.

      One thing to keep in mind is that all of the very big players come out with new products several times a year. It's not at all about sales. The big thing is the list building aspect of it. Almost without exception, the big Clickbank guys hit their list every single day, sometimes more than once a day.

      If anyone has Tellman Knudson's free report titled, The Great Extinction, you will know how firmly he believes in hitting his list every day and how once he started doing that his earnings skyrocketed. By the way, he obviously knows his stuff because if you Google up "list building" Tellman's page comes up in the #1 spot--and that is some pretty valuable real estate he owns there.
      Signature

      I'll help you create a reputation-building evergreen product in any niche and launch it successfully!
      Check it out here.

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3312775].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author mikemcmillan
    Just as a postscript, I've been on the WF here for about two years now. Without naming names, I've seen 3-4 Warriors here come out with very successful WSOs which they immediately churned into front page Clickbank launches in the eMarketing category. I am on their lists and guess what, their model of email marketing has changed significantly after becoming players.

    To their credit, if you look at the number of super-affiliates who got their start here on this Forum, it is truly a testament to how much one can learn from interacting with others and building relationships here. It's like a college education with no tuition.
    Signature

    I'll help you create a reputation-building evergreen product in any niche and launch it successfully!
    Check it out here.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3312705].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Fazal Mayar
    Thats not an excuse. You decide of your partners, it doesnt mean its a product launch that is a launch of a quality product. You can say no to your parner, you can decline his proposition.
    Signature

    Blogger at RicherOrNot.com (Make Money online blog but also promoting ethical internet marketing)

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3312733].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author jamie67
    I would never promote a product that I had not used myself - It's your repetation that is at stake after all.
    Signature
    ***************************
    No affiliate links in sigs.
    *****************************
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3312791].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by freemen14 View Post

      Mike.

      Thank you for your take. As I mentioned in my first post I was looking for perspective and I totally understand your take and found it to be very insightful as to how the "big boys" roll. I guess for some it comes down to a numbers game. Never even thought about that.
      Extending what Mike said...

      Some of the quid pro quo promotions are less about making money or growing a list, and more about honoring promises to your partners.

      I'm starting to think that the big guys that send canned promos are less lazy and more about CYA. They owe a mailing, but they don't really want to be tied to the other product by putting too much into promoting. So they send the canned email, knowing that the response is likely to suck and that the folks who don't opt out will likely forget the canned email next time they send something good.

      Originally Posted by Fazal Mayar View Post

      Thats not an excuse. You decide of your partners, it doesnt mean its a product launch that is a launch of a quality product. You can say no to your parner, you can decline his proposition.
      Saying no to your partner without a darn good reason is a good way to not have partners. And 'your product sucks' isn't considered a good reason.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3312914].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author russells
    You'll be surprised how many list owners send out garbage on a daily basis. I'm currently subscribed to around 5 lists and love the content I'm provided with.

    Though recently, I purchased a report and have had nothing but promotions sent to me...no turst building, no free content. Just pure selling. Have I purchased through his links? Hell no.

    Have I purchased stuff from the other lists that I do trust? Of course.

    I am a list owner myself and the products I promote are endorsed by myself and they benefit the business model that my subscribers are interested in.

    I don't promote the next biggest launch if it has zero to do with what my subscribers are currently doing.

    I think that's important.

    ~Russ
    Signature





    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3312942].message }}

Trending Topics