Objection - "Everything works perfect. I don't believe you can add value to that"

by thet
41 replies
How do we respond to this objection?
#objection
  • Profile picture of the author jimbo13
    Ok, well let's see then. Have you got 60 seconds?

    Dan
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    • Originally Posted by jimbo13 View Post

      Ok, well let's see then. Have you got 60 seconds?

      Dan


      give me 60 seconds, and I can tell you that other companies that have said the same thing, and this is how we helped them.

      then you can tell me if you want to continue the conversation another minute or 2, sound good?
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      • Profile picture of the author thet
        Originally Posted by kirbymarketingconcierge View Post

        give me 60 seconds, and I can tell you that other companies that have said the same thing, and this is how we helped them.

        then you can tell me if you want to continue the conversation another minute or 2, sound good?
        Thank you, how do you like this (I have not tried yet)

        Good to hear, however, I have heard that a lot until they see what we can deliver. You can see it as a fresh look at your solutions. Let me ask you the following..

        ;;;;

        And then I ask him a question about something we solved for our costumers.
        Signature

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        • Originally Posted by thet View Post

          Thank you, how do you like this (I have not tried yet)

          Good to hear, however, I have heard that a lot until they see what we can deliver. You can see it as a fresh look at your solutions. Let me ask you the following..

          ;;;;

          And then I ask him a question about something we solved for our costumers.
          that will work. good job!

          remember, their response is scripted and not real.

          we have to respond, in some way to get past the "barking dog" at the gate.
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          • Profile picture of the author thet
            Originally Posted by kirbymarketingconcierge View Post

            that will work. good job!

            remember, their response is scripted and not real.

            we have to respond, in some way to get past the "barking dog" at the gate.
            Awesome. Thank you.

            I also wonder,

            Would this be better as an opening:

            Hi John, X here, Am I calling you at a bad time?

            "No. What's this about"

            Maybe I should introduce myself........ {and then go in the pitch}


            The reason I wonder if that would work, is because if I start with the pitch right away.. they might miss an essential part of what we do.
            It makes them listen. Perhaps

            Or is it weak sauce?
            Signature

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            — Charlie Munger

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            • Profile picture of the author jamesfreddyc
              Originally Posted by thet View Post

              Awesome. Thank you.

              I also wonder,

              Would this be better as an opening:

              Hi John, X here, Am I calling you at a bad time?

              "No. What's this about"

              Maybe I should introduce myself........ {and then go in the pitch}


              The reason I wonder if that would work, is because if I start with the pitch right away.. they might miss an essential part of what we do.
              It makes them listen. Perhaps

              Or is it weak sauce?
              If you want to start in a stronger position you can attempt to prize yourself by being committed to some other event and only have a minute of your time right now. I haven't done or do this but it's very Oren Klaff esque...

              "Hey John, James here. My 2:00 should be here any minute but think I can talk for a minute to see if we should meet later. I provide <your value statement>."

              I really have no idea how this would work. Never tested but just an idea I guess.
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              • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
                Originally Posted by jamesfreddyc View Post

                If you want to start in a stronger position you can attempt to prize yourself by being committed to some other event and only have a minute of your time right now. I haven't done or do this but it's very Oren Klaff esque...

                "Hey John, James here. My 2:00 should be here any minute but think I can talk for a minute to see if we should meet later. I provide <your value statement>."

                I really have no idea how this would work. Never tested but just an idea I guess.
                When I was knocking on doors, I tried "I only have a minute. (As I started turning to walk away), but I'll give you a case of your favorite pop (we say pop, not soda), if you take a quick look at an environmental product we are test marketing. What kind of pop do you drink?".

                It worked as well as anything else. I stopped using it, because I couldn't qualify them well, until I came back.

                To the OP.

                Why in the world would you hear "Everything works perfect. I don't believe you can add value to that"? How can that be the answer to a question? If you are just setting appointments, I think that would be incredibly unusual to hear.

                Although I used to hear "We already have a vacuum cleaner"....as though some people don't have one. I would say "Then you have no danger of buying one. But I'l give you a gift, just so I can practice. Fair enough?"

                It actually worked pretty often, but that's just nostalgia. I don't know how you would adapt it.
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                • Profile picture of the author thet
                  Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

                  When I was knocking on doors, I tried "I only have a minute. (As I started turning to walk away), but I'll give you a case of your favorite pop (we say pop, not soda), if you take a quick look at an environmental product we are test marketing. What kind of pop do you drink?".

                  It worked as well as anything else. I stopped using it, because I couldn't qualify them well, until I came back.

                  To the OP.

                  Why in the world would you hear "Everything works perfect. I don't believe you can add value to that"? How can that be the answer to a question? If you are just setting appointments, I think that would be incredibly unusual to hear.

                  Although I used to hear "We already have a vacuum cleaner"....as though some people don't have one. I would say "Then you have no danger of buying one. But I'l give you a gift, just so I can practice. Fair enough?"

                  It actually worked pretty often, but that's just nostalgia. I don't know how you would adapt it.
                  It's not that unusual. But don't hear it every time I make a call.
                  I think it's because we sell components for infrastructure. So, when they just re-installed all components ..or have the feeling their components work well enough they give that 'objection'.

                  But maybe, just maybe.. I should end it there, because they simply might not be a prospect.

                  However, I believe we can add value by adding our stuff on what they already have, to even improve it further or atleast to see if it can be improved.

                  I also made my beginning pitch a bit longer. 4 sentences. I notice I book most meetings when I have given a good image of what we as a company are and do.

                  So, before my "pitch" would be ..10 sec max. I think Im now at 30 sec max. I need to create a bigger picture for them to actually want to meet.

                  Telling them, shortly what we do in one sentence. Telling them that we work with clients in their sector.. Well, what does that really tell them? (i realised this yesterday on my way home listening to my calls of the day)

                  I book most appointments when I get the question: Yes, what do you actually do?

                  And then I go in a short pitch of 20 - 30 seconds.. And then I get a lot of positive responses.

                  So I thought to myself.. What if I take that 20-30 seconds to the front..

                  Going to test it today. Bit nervous. It's a longer pitch so I might get cut off.
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  • Profile picture of the author socialentry
    It's a variation of "we already have a supplier"
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    • Profile picture of the author thet
      Originally Posted by socialentry View Post

      It's a variation of "we already have a supplier"
      yes, it is. It's simply a "you did not trigger me enough to meet with you".
      So,
      with asking for "pain points" I thought, I might shake things up so I can show how I can add value.
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  • Profile picture of the author Stephanie L
    "The horse buggy worked perfectly too when the automobile came along. My product is the automobile, yours is the stinky horse buggy."
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    • Profile picture of the author OUTFOXED
      Originally Posted by Stephanie L View Post

      "The horse buggy worked perfectly too when the automobile came along. My product is the automobile, yours is the stinky horse buggy."
      That's a good analogy..."you, us, we" could change the words but the core is a strong use of implied comparisons. Good post.
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      • Profile picture of the author TheBigBee
        Best thing to do is nothing. "Sorry sir, have a great day!"

        You wanna run from a guy at this stage because when it comes to close, he will have a dominant close. The more you beg for close, the less you make.

        Send him your newsletter until he gets into a less "dominant" frame.
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        FILL IN THE BLANKS!
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  • Profile picture of the author mjbmedia
    If you did ever hear something like this then ............

    'so when you say "everything works perfect" , can you explain to me what 'perfection' is in your companies case and exactly how todays 'perfection' compares to the perceived 'perfection' your company presumed it was enjoying (5 , 10, 15) (months, years weeks) ago before it realised it needs to progress further to remain or increase its competitiveness'
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    Mike

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    • Profile picture of the author thet
      Originally Posted by mjbmedia View Post

      If you did ever hear something like this then ............

      'so when you say "everything works perfect" , can you explain to me what 'perfection' is in your companies case and exactly how todays 'perfection' compares to the perceived 'perfection' your company presumed it was enjoying (5 , 10, 15) (months, years weeks) ago before it realised it needs to progress further to remain or increase its competitiveness'
      That seems like a super strong response. Tested it?
      Signature

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      • Profile picture of the author jimbo13
        ^^ Kind of but in a different way.

        'Hand on heart can you say that what (be specific eg computer) you have now is what you will have in 5 years time?'

        Or 'the way you do things now' or whatever else is relevant. From education to jobs to everything you can say this.

        If you have kids and they are predicted a C can you say hand on heart they cannot get an A? If you didn't score a goal can you say hand on heart you couldn't have? If you didn't make a sale can you say hand on heart no one else could have sold it?

        You get the idea.

        Almost everyone will say no.

        Which goes back to the Newton thing I wrote for you.

        The first glimmer that a movement will or needs to occur. From A to B.

        And you are going to show them how you are going to do it with your product, service.

        Dan
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        • Profile picture of the author thet
          Originally Posted by jimbo13 View Post

          ^^ Kind of but in a different way.

          'Hand on heart can you say that what (be specific eg computer) you have now is what you will have in 5 years time?'

          Or 'the way you do things now' or whatever else is relevant. From education to jobs to everything you can say this.

          If you have kids and they are predicted a C can you say hand on heart they cannot get an A? If you didn't score a goal can you say hand on heart you couldn't have? If you didn't make a sale can you say hand on heart no one else could have sold it?

          You get the idea.

          Almost everyone will say no.

          Which goes back to the Newton thing I wrote for you.

          The first glimmer that a movement will or needs to occur. From A to B.

          And you are going to show them how you are going to do it with your product, service.

          Dan
          Highly appreciated. Thank you!
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          Recognize reality even when you don't like it - especially when you don't like it.
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      • Profile picture of the author mjbmedia
        Originally Posted by thet View Post

        That seems like a super strong response. Tested it?
        not those exact words as I never had your type of response, but I will certainly respond that strongly and confidently, its not rude or challenging, just inviting them and me to totally focus on what they seem to feel is the answer or reason for them not to proceed (for now) .

        In this case Id expect them to talk their way round to realising they are far from perfection and that if they are not aware of what they are missing out on (marketing wise in this instance) then how can they possibly honestly and seriously determine they are experiencing perfection.

        for me once they realise Im not going to sit there buying their BS its up to them, they either come more onboard and respect me a lot or ask me to leave cos theyre too dumb and scared of losing face.
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        Mike

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  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    I don't like saying stinky horse buggy or arguing with them over what they mean by "perfection" - one's an insult and the other's just verbal wrangling.

    Your response "a lot of people say that until..." is pretty good (Stephan Schiffman stuff?) or any variation of that where you can then segue to show the fatal chink in the armor they don't know is there in their belief that what they have is perfect or even if they're saying it as a bs excuse to get you to back down.
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  • Profile picture of the author thet
    I find it interesting to see how many people on this forum say they never get certain responses like "I am not interested" or "Everything we have works just fine".

    Is it because they are so good at qualifying or pitching they simply don't get it?

    I am the phone daily cold calling. I get a "I am not interested" or a "everything works just fine" atleast once a week
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    • Profile picture of the author mjbmedia
      Originally Posted by thet View Post

      I find it interesting to see how many people on this forum say they never get certain responses like "I am not interested" or "Everything we have works just fine".

      Is it because they are so good at qualifying or pitching they simply don't get it?

      I am the phone daily cold calling. I get a "I am not interested" or a "everything works just fine" atleast once a week
      on reading your posts I see you sell components for manufacturing???

      so different from marketing services , so I can understand more that you may get the response you mention whereas we would be far less likely to,

      However its just a challenge to see how confident you are in what you are selling and the difference it can make to your prospects businesses.

      Simply ask them how they currently manage (whatever your components can improve on) , what results they are getting, what issues they have , eg if they have some downtime due to their current components then discuss how that down time affects their costs, their staff morale, their delivery ability etc etc , get them to expand on the issues and that if they reduced those issues what positive effect would it have on other aspects of the business, bottom line profits , manufacturing costs, staff overtime requirements to catch up on backlog, businesses reputation of delivering on time every time etc etc etc .

      you need to believe in your products 1000 times the amount your prospect believes they already have perfection , because believe me, they do NOT have anywhere near perfection
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      Mike

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      • Profile picture of the author thet
        Originally Posted by mjbmedia View Post

        on reading your posts I see you sell components for manufacturing???

        so different from marketing services , so I can understand more that you may get the response you mention whereas we would be far less likely to,

        However its just a challenge to see how confident you are in what you are selling and the difference it can make to your prospects businesses.

        Simply ask them how they currently manage (whatever your components can improve on) , what results they are getting, what issues they have , eg if they have some downtime due to their current components then discuss how that down time affects their costs, their staff morale, their delivery ability etc etc , get them to expand on the issues and that if they reduced those issues what positive effect would it have on other aspects of the business, bottom line profits , manufacturing costs, staff overtime requirements to catch up on backlog, businesses reputation of delivering on time every time etc etc etc .

        you need to believe in your products 1000 times the amount your prospect believes they already have perfection , because believe me, they do NOT have anywhere near perfection
        I agree.

        I am overthinking this, I know. But I am very new to this and I don't have a collegue that does the same job as me. I am the only one lol

        I took the job as kind of a risk. Because I was not sure if I could do it haha I am pretty happy with the results so far, but since they also took a risk with me, it's only fair that I do my utter best to get as good as I can get. For them, but also for my own career.

        It's a sunk cost thing. I am not going to have had 6 months of pain cold calling to give up on it. It's a great foundation for my career.

        I believe very much in our products. However, there are more companies who sell them.

        I am not sure where we bring our "unique value" because we are not the only company who can do what we do.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rearden
    Depending on where you are in the sales process dictates how you would answer that objection (if that is what it really is).

    If you are prospecting for an appointment, that is just a knee-jerk reaction.

    I'd get that frequently when selling uniform services.

    Understand, depending on the person you're talking to, it's quite probable that the person you're talking has no idea if the vendor is perfect.

    Many confuse "No news" as being "Good news," when that is hardly the case in Corporate America, as people usually go along to get along.

    Plus there are always multiple players and varying levels of influence in businesses, from the end user who actually uses the product, to the check writer who's responsible for approving a buying decision, to the technical buyer who is responsible for vetting the purchase. They all have a role in buying a new product and have different motivating factors.

    With that understanding, simply acknowledge the statement, and explain how most of our best clients said that at first, then close for the appointment.

    For example, in the uniform business, the rebuttal would be:

    "I completely understand Dale and what's funny is most of my clients said the same thing before agreeing to meet me; I need 10 minutes just to show you how ABC Uniform Company has helped your competitors like ABC Chemical and XYZ Chemical with their uniform program, how's Tuesday at 2?"

    For life insurance, the best prospect for us to meet is the one who is ALREADY paying the premium -- because they "get" life insurance, and already have it budgeted.

    Many of my prospects have inferior life insurance and they just don't know it. They need to see me in person and have me show them their policy to explain it, so I have to sell them on the appointment, it's quickness, etc.

    If I'm told there is no reason to meet because I have enough insurance already, I'll say:

    "That's totally fine, Mr. Prospect and people like you with enough insurance meet with me anyway is because prices have gone down over the years but prices for funerals have gone up -- I need 10 minutes to show you how our new programs work -- what you do with it is up to you how's Tuesday at 2?"

    Now, if you are in the appointment and they say that at the beginning, acknowledge it and continue your presentation or fact-finding.

    If you are near the end of your presentation and that comes up again, ask "How do you mean?" and allow the prospect time to fully define what in his mind would constitute "perfect service from a vendor."

    This is important, because it shows what he values most. However, if you have the opportunity to show him otherwise, by finding other parties involved in the process (End Users, Technical Buyers, Check Writers) you may be able to chip away at the perception if it is truly faulty.

    If you are selling life insurance, then gaining access to the policy is the way to SHOW the client how inferior the policy REALLY is.
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    David Duford -- Providing On-Going, Personalized Mentorship And Training From A Real Final Expense Producer To Agents New To The Final Expense Life Insurance Business.
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    • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
      There's no helping a buyer making a better informed choice
      when they are ready to buy.

      When something sounds as important to a buyer,
      like you have, then offering things they don't know
      which has a impact,on whatever it does, gives them
      confidence in themselves and your company.

      I know this may be beyond your control,
      however if this could be put together in
      a media format that can easily consumed by a buyer,
      then all the pre-selling gets done by automation.

      This misses out on all the up and downs
      from prospectors and sales people cause.

      The company's job is to get the buyers guide into
      the buyers hands so it creates the ready to buy person.

      It will become one of the most valuable assets your employer has.

      It would be a great way for you to add greatly to your
      employer to talk to him about it.

      Best,
      Doctor E. Vile
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        I was wracking my brain to remember when a prospect brought this objection up. I finally found this in my notes from years ago.

        I was selling Life Insurance and the guy said "I have exactly the right amount of life insurance right now. Thank you" (This was in person, not over the phone)

        I said "You may well be right. But rates change, options run out....in a few minutes I could tell if you're getting the most for your money. And in the process, I could learn what a great program looks like. We both win. Can I have ten minutes?"

        I can't believe he said "OK'. Of course he had almost no insurance, and I sold a huge policy.

        People are like eggs. The hardest shell protects the softest yoke.

        I wrote it down, because I couldn't believe it worked. After that, I'm not sure I ever heard that objection again. And Reardon's post reminded me of it.
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        • Profile picture of the author thet
          Interesting. So to get this objection a lot is doing something wrong?

          I mean, you sell vacuum cleaners right? There are many vacuum cleaner.. who can.. vacuum clean?

          So I can't get my head around that you never get that objection.
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          • Profile picture of the author Rearden
            Originally Posted by thet View Post

            Interesting. So to get this objection a lot is doing something wrong?

            I mean, you sell vacuum cleaners right? There are many vacuum cleaner.. who can.. vacuum clean?

            So I can't get my head around that you never get that objection.
            It really depends on the industry you work in.

            Are you prospecting residential? Small Business? Medium/Large/Corporate Entities?

            My best uniform prospects were the ones already paying the weekly fee. IE - they already HAD a uniform program, understood the advantages, etc.

            I didn't have to sell them on WHY to have a uniform program; no -- all I needed to do was sell them on why OUR uniform program was SUPERIOR to the one they currently had.

            Mixed in with contractual obligations customers had with their current vendor, along with multiple influencers to the sale, you would quite commonly hear "everything works perfect," simply because you did not have someone who really UNDERSTOOD what was happening at the ground level.

            The only important thing was for the rep to GET THE APPOINTMENT. From there, he could go in as the "consultant," talk to the end users to get their opinions of the program, etc., and reveal the TRUTH of the program to the influencer.

            I had a prospect a few years ago where the lady was new to her position. She thought everything was fine, and suggested the meeting wouldn't be worth my time. I persisted anyway and asked to tour the facility to talk to the end-users.

            The actual users of the uniform program were royally pissed with the incumbent vendor -- blown-out pants, missing buttons, shoddy materials. Very unprofessional and potentially a hazard to the employees and employer (chemical manufacturing).

            That experience solidified that some key players in a buying role (a) think no news is good news, and (b) solidified the importance of SIMPLY GETTING THE APPOINTMENT, as much of what is said on the phone is PURE B.S., intentional or not.

            Thus applies to all sales roles. There are great life insurance sales to be made in my line of work on people who never would have thought of replacing their old program for my new one. Namely because they didn't know the true extent of how bad their existing coverage was.

            That's why you should ALWAYS sell the appointment, NOT the product, when setting the appointment. There is SO MUCH opportunity out there if the rep will get off his lazy ass and just FIGHT TO SEE THE PEOPLE.
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          • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
            Originally Posted by thet View Post

            Interesting. So to get this objection a lot is doing something wrong?

            I mean, you sell vacuum cleaners right? There are many vacuum cleaner.. who can.. vacuum clean?

            So I can't get my head around that you never get that objection.
            We trigger almost every objection we get from prospects. I just never give them a reason to.

            Everyone has a vacuum cleaner.

            Decades ago, I would hear "We already have a vacuum cleaner"

            At first, it stumped me. Eventually, I would just say "I know. We only talk to people that already have a vacuum cleaner"

            But I haven't heard "We already have a vacuum cleaner" for maybe 30 years.

            I ask questions where "We already own a vacuum cleaner" simply isn't an answer.

            And after I talk with them for a few minutes, it never crosses their mind.

            If you are getting that objection at the very beginning, more than 5% of the time, you are saying something that triggers that response. Or, you are using a speech pattern that triggers that response.
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  • Profile picture of the author thet
    I target enterprises.

    We are a reseller. So, we are not unique in the products we sell. There are more companies who sell them + the differences between all products on the market arent really that different if you view it on a technical level.
    Most products last 3-5 years we sell (that's standard in our industry, so this counts for all resellers). So, I feel like I am hitting them right at the point of that 3-5 years where I have the best results. Then it's worth checking out the market for most costumers. Before that, well, there might be some improvement possible, ofcourse (it's a cluster of hardware solution that we sell. If they just replaced Y, then Z might be a option to make it even more effective. OR C, or X). So then I pitch on that to meet us (the fact that there is always room for improvement)
    So maybe my qualifying question in my intro has to do with that


    I do focus on getting knowledge about our products to a level I can dream about it.

    Thats what I find most difficult in my job. I pitch for appointments. But when it comes to uniqueness, well, it's a hard find.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rearden
    What is your unique selling proposition?

    Why would a customer want to do business with you?

    It's obvious you need to identify that.

    That was my problem in the uniform business.

    I worked for a Fortune 500 business that sold uniforms in one of its ancillary divisions.

    The uniform business is a mature business model with almost total product saturation (beyond selling new businesses opening).

    The problem I ran into is that my company (Aramark Uniform Services) was a "Me-Too" company.

    All the fluff and BS we propagated on our prospects was without merit; effectively nothing different from what CINTAS or UniFirst could do.

    When corporate decides the best way to raise revenue is through enacting off-cycle price increases, then you know the company is having problems winning business the RIGHT way.

    I left after a year because I did not believe in the company, nor in my products. I didn't have a leg to stand on that reinforced some sort of belief in what I sold.

    Basically, ARAMARK did not have a USP, except "Try us when your current vendor goes to crap."
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    David Duford -- Providing On-Going, Personalized Mentorship And Training From A Real Final Expense Producer To Agents New To The Final Expense Life Insurance Business.
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  • Profile picture of the author thet
    Interesting you mention that.
    As a reseller, we have the same hardware as others.
    We do have engineers, which means we can also implement the hardware, when needed.

    I am not sure why a costumer would want to business with us, to be fair. I know that's a problem.
    I believe we have great solutions, they score high in their segments.
    So,
    I would say.. it's because by also looking at us, the costumer simply has more choice and options for their projects.

    The unique selling prop. is probably that we aren't just a reseller, but that we are also able to implement.

    But, also that is something other companies can do.

    I noticed this problem while reading the book "zero to one" from Peter Thiel. Its not that unique what we do????????
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    • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
      Originally Posted by thet View Post

      Interesting you mention that.
      As a reseller, we have the same hardware as others.
      We do have engineers, which means we can also implement the hardware, when needed.

      I am not sure why a costumer would want to business with us, to be fair. I know that's a problem.
      I believe we have great solutions, they score high in their segments.
      So,
      I would say.. it's because by also looking at us, the costumer simply has more choice and options for their projects.

      The unique selling prop. is probably that we aren't just a reseller, but that we are also able to implement.

      But, also that is something other companies can do.

      I noticed this problem while reading the book "zero to one" from Peter Thiel. Its not that unique what we do????????
      So you are a value added reseller. Perhaps get some points from your engineers about what makes
      you better. Staff competencies, implementation and installation, and what is in the contract make a huge difference. Dig a little deeper into your company and competition.
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      • Profile picture of the author thet
        Originally Posted by bizgrower View Post

        So you are a value added reseller. Perhaps get some points from your engineers about what makes
        you better. Staff competencies, implementation and installation, and what is in the contract make a huge difference. Dig a little deeper into your company and competition.
        Good point.
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  • Profile picture of the author thet
    I think my best days are when I simply call with a relaxed voice, not caring about the outcome at all.
    Pitch them, but a bit with a "I dont care what happens" mindset

    Days like this, I also get objections but I simply don't care about them.. while I still acknowledge them.

    Other days, I can be stressed. Want to get to the next call.. while I am still on THIS call.

    Is that what you mean with speech pattern?
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  • Profile picture of the author DaniMc
    Some good responses above, and I feel that most of them have some form of disagreement with the prospect. I will bend my mind into pretzels in order to avoid disagreeing with them. IMO, we need to use our language to reinforce what they already believe, and then tack ourselves onto that belief.

    In this situation I would say "I agree you probably have the very best solution for your situation because it is obviously working for you AND if there were a [product, service, device] that could increase your X and lower Y - you would definitely want to know about it, wouldn't you?"

    The thing is, if they had a problem they knew about, they would not give this objection. If they give this objection, then they have something that is working. It probably IS the best solution for them right at this moment. In the past, it got them to where they are. You are selling the future, not the past.

    Never insult their past buying choices or disagree with their belief that what they have is perfect. Woe to the salesman who makes people feel like they made the wrong choice.

    Notice the word "AND" up above - banish the word "but" from your vocabulary - it is always a disagreement with the statement that precedes it! The only time we should use "but" is when we WANT someone to forget the first thing we said. I have almost completely stricken the word but from my language. It works.

    It's not just the actual word "but" that we need to drop - it is the intention to disagree. We should all work hard to stop communicating "but" in our words, phrases, and body language. It takes practice.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Dan McCoy View Post

      IMO, we need to use our language to reinforce what they already believe, and then tack ourselves onto that belief.

      Never insult their past buying choices or disagree with their belief that what they have is perfect. Woe to the salesman who makes people feel like they made the wrong choice.

      .
      Yup. Whatever they have done, up until now, is the first half of what they should be doing. Our offer is simply the second half.

      Never argue, and never say that they made a mistake. Buying decisions are always right...because that's what you are going to ask them to do again..with you.
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  • Profile picture of the author thet
    Why are they always right?

    When they where the wrong decision, they where the wrong decision, right?

    Please explain this to somebody who simply loves to argue and I dare to say it's in my nature to argue?

    (see, even here I am argueing about "telling them wrong", how ironic lol)
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    • Profile picture of the author DaniMc
      Originally Posted by thet View Post

      Why are they always right?

      When they where the wrong decision, they where the wrong decision, right?

      Please explain this to somebody who simply loves to argue and I dare to say it's in my nature to argue?

      (see, even here I am argueing about "telling them wrong", how ironic lol)
      You are correct - sometimes people are wrong. If you could go back in time to help them make the right choice in the past, you would, wouldn't you?

      Of course you would.

      Even if they really are wrong - do you believe telling them so just makes them dig in? Or, do people listen when they are told they are wrong?

      You have every right to love to argue - who doesn't like a good debate sometimes? You can still do it, it's just a lot cheaper to save it for your buddies who like to argue also.

      All the forces of hell will not be able to push someone to your way of thinking. If you cross over to their side, stand there shoulder to shoulder with them, and really understand what they are saying, you will be able to lead them to a better place.

      Isn't that all selling is? Leadership?
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by thet View Post

      Why are they always right?

      When they where the wrong decision, they where the wrong decision, right?
      Their previous decisions to buy are always right. This is never going to be anything else. If the thing they bought is crap, you can still compliment their decision.

      Making a decision is what CEOs do...what leaders do.

      Never say that they did something stupid, because the only way they can get back at you, is to not buy.

      You should carve this in your forehead, and then look in the mirror every morning... to remind you.
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      • Profile picture of the author thet
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        Their previous decisions to buy are always right. This is never going to be anything else. If the thing they bought is crap, you can still compliment their decision.

        Making a decision is what CEOs do...what leaders do.

        Never say that they did something stupid, because the only way they can get back at you, is to not buy.

        You should carve this in your forehead, and then look in the mirror every morning... to remind you.
        What you are saying is... CEO wanted to have a solution for their business to improve X. It's a great decision that he wanted to improve X. So, we focus on that part, because the damage is done and he will use one of his cogntive biases (probably cognitive dissonance) to justify his decision. So, in that cold call.. you can argue to death about how your solution (or even your company for that matter) is better, or you can compliment him with the decision and show him how my solution can make his even better?

        That's why it probably works best when they have you the "we already have a supplier" to tell them we ain't getting inbetween them, and that we compliment what they do. And that having an extra supplier gives them the best prices and options for their future projects.

        Lots of salesmen probably focus on why they should work with them and not with the competition.
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  • Profile picture of the author Matthew North
    Originally Posted by thet View Post

    How do we respond to this objection?
    "I appreciate that, and it probably doesn't make any sense at all to change something, but if your current system could do one thing better....what would that be?"

    If they say. the magic words: 'Nothing'..'

    You: So what you're telling me is that if we could (reduce cost, increase revenue, improve security, etc.), it wouldn't matter to you.. And you'll stay where you are?

    Hole = sale, no hole = no sale for these kinds of leads ime.
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