Problem building desire

by kevd10
22 replies
As discussed in a previous post of mine, I sell kitchens and bathrooms for a large, specialist kitchen firm in the UK.

We genuinely have the best quality kitchens available anywhere in the region. I do direct selling in homes, positioning myself as a designer. I design a new kitchen on a software interface and show it to prospective customers. The leads come from canvassing and aren't heavily qualified, sometimes not at all.

On average, our team of salesmen converts around 1 in 3 leads. I am underperforming at present as I am quite new to the whole thing.

My problem is, when it comes to giving the price, people tend to expect it to be a lot lower than what it is, and I lose the sale.

My manager says it is a desire building issue.

Any help appreciated, as I am starting to become negative about the situation and that is putting more and more pressure on the sale.
#building #desire #problem
  • Profile picture of the author savidge4
    First and foremost you need to get with the top sales guy and ride with him / her for a day or 2. How are they building desire? ( I would use the term "Motivation" - building the motivation to buy )

    *** If I were selling kitchens I would do the above... if that were not possible I would try the method below.. it is actually the process the wife and I go through when creating or renovating a kitchen ***

    Having built a number of kitchens myself... I know where the expense comes into play. Let me know if you agree... its the countertops down. ( Sinks, Countertops, base cabinets, and flooring )

    If you start your presentation with the space itself. "what would your dream space look like?" ( there is expense in "creating" the space, but people will see this as value ) you then start with appliance choices and positioning. then you move into upper cabinet and pantry type cabinets and last you approach the sink the countertop the base cabinets and all of their add-ons and the flooring.

    So when you smack them with the final price.. and they question the price... "We were designing your dream, so now lets get back in and start working the dream into a reality." They are still on the hook, and they are engaged.

    The space itself you will not need to touch. the appliances there may be some financial fudging here. the "Storage" probably will not be touched... its when you get into the sink, the countertop and the lower cabinets that you start pulling out the budget friendly solutions.

    The cabinets themselves... Their dream is finish A, but you can offer finish B that is very similar but 1/2 the price. Countertops... They want Marble.. but they are porous and stain and need to be maintained.. how about Granite at 25% less this finish is very similar to your dream. Flooring A or Flooring B

    Take them all the way to the top of the mountain, and then frame that picture into a package they can afford. Its not about sacrifice its about making prudent and wise choices to get what they want at a price they can afford.
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  • Profile picture of the author Freebiequeen1999
    IMHO....you may have a problem "defining" the desire

    when I sold spa/facial/etc equipment in little towns all over Florida and Alabama, I soon learned to find out the desire of the owner...most times it was add on stuff to existing (hair) salons...

    The general push of the company and others selling was "become a spa, clients want this, you will make more money">> well yeah that was a given
    but
    I learned to listen and find the other reasons...

    oftentimes it came down to - "prestige"...."social standing"....these hair dressers in a little cookie cutter shop wanted to be "more"...they saw a day spa as a step up....classier...more luxury....

    other times it came down to "besting" a rival - wanting to be the first in town to offer microdermabrasion and sauna and etc etc

    You may find some of your potential clients really want a cozy space for the "family to be together"...

    they may want to "best" their neighbor or relative who just got a new kitchen

    and of course some may want more storage/space or ability to cook gourmet...
    others may want efficiency, easy to clean...pop something in the microwave
    others may want to entertain...who knows?

    Listen to them...paint the picture....assume the sale...the basics

    as for your sales manager why doesn't he take you out with him?
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    • Profile picture of the author kevd10
      Originally Posted by Freebiequeen1999 View Post

      IMHO....you may have a problem "defining" the desire

      when I sold spa/facial/etc equipment in little towns all over Florida and Alabama, I soon learned to find out the desire of the owner...most times it was add on stuff to existing (hair) salons...

      The general push of the company and others selling was "become a spa, clients want this, you will make more money">> well yeah that was a given
      but
      I learned to listen and find the other reasons...

      oftentimes it came down to - "prestige"...."social standing"....these hair dressers in a little cookie cutter shop wanted to be "more"...they saw a day spa as a step up....classier...more luxury....

      other times it came down to "besting" a rival - wanting to be the first in town to offer microdermabrasion and sauna and etc etc

      You may find some of your potential clients really want a cozy space for the "family to be together"...

      they may want to "best" their neighbor or relative who just got a new kitchen

      and of course some may want more storage/space or ability to cook gourmet...
      others may want efficiency, easy to clean...pop something in the microwave
      others may want to entertain...who knows?

      Listen to them...paint the picture....assume the sale...the basics

      as for your sales manager why doesn't he take you out with him?

      I have been out with the sales manager and the top sales guy. It kind of comes naturally to them, so as far as I can see, I'm copying what they do. Obviously not with the same results.


      To be honest, Iv never really had any basic sales training. Such as 'assume the sale' as you put it. Maybe this is the problem.
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by kevd10 View Post

        I have been out with the sales manager and the top sales guy. It kind of comes naturally to them, so as far as I can see, I'm copying what they do. Obviously not with the same results.
        .
        You are not copying what they do. You are copying what you think they are doing.

        It doesn't come naturally to them. They put in the effort to learn how to sell. Now, it's your turn.

        Has your manager been out with you, when you put on a presentation? He needs to, and you need to listen to what he says. I promise you, you aren't doing what you think you're doing.

        Originally Posted by kevd10 View Post

        Any help appreciated, as I am starting to become negative about the situation and that is putting more and more pressure on the sale.
        Don't be negative about the situation. Be negative about your lack of skills. Read a few great books on selling. I have a few.

        Ask your manager to practice with you. Ask him to go with you on an appointment. Do they have DVDs of a great presentation? If they do, study it. Memorize how to present features. Memorize the best way to ask questions.

        If they don't have a DVD, ask if you can record a presentation your manager gives.
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        • Profile picture of the author kevd10
          Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

          You are not copying what they do. You are copying what you think they are doing.

          It doesn't come naturally to them. They put in the effort to learn how to sell. Now, it's your turn.

          Has your manager been out with you, when you put on a presentation? He needs to, and you need to listen to what he says. I promise you, you aren't doing what you think you're doing.



          Don't be negative about the situation. Be negative about your lack of skills. Read a few great books on selling. I have a few.


          Ask your manager to practice with you. Ask him to go with you on an appointment. Do they have DVDs of a great presentation? If they do, study it. Memorize how to present features. Memorize the best way to ask questions.

          If they don't have a DVD, ask if you can record a presentation your manager gives.


          I know what a great presentation looks like, we all do the same one and I have seen the top guy do it time and time again, so I do copy him to the best of my ability. You are right, I am missing something. I can't put my finger on it. Which sales books would you recommend for this particular style of selling? I've read your 'One call closing' and also QBS, which I wasn't too impressed with.


          I need to be able to put down on a piece of paper my exact routine with each lead.


          EDIT: I didn't mean I wasn't impressed with your book, I meant with QBS.
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          • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
            Originally Posted by kevd10 View Post

            I know what a great presentation looks like, we all do the same one and I have seen the top guy do it time and time again, so I do copy him to the best of my ability. You are right, I am missing something. I can't put my finger on it. Which sales books would you recommend for this particular style of selling? I've read your 'One call closing' and also QBS, which I wasn't too impressed with.


            I need to be able to put down on a piece of paper my exact routine with each lead.


            EDIT: I didn't mean I wasn't impressed with your book, I meant with QBS.
            Sometimes the trainer or partner your matched up with is to far advanced
            for you to learn properly.

            Only the true greats will know it and be able to adjust. Most will crash
            and burn if they attempt to change their rhythm for you.

            Also - depending on how far ahead on the curve they are compared to you
            you might never be able to see it.

            I bet - ( and this is a complete guess ) what you are missing are all
            the subtle conversation maneuvering - When a pro is watching another
            pro do it - even they miss it. IF it was done properly.

            That's a pro - your not a pro, so how are you supposed to see it?

            Before you pull your hair out - see if you can just change who you
            go on calls with.

            Blindly copying stuff does you no good. You have to know why.
            Why it works and why it doesn't work.
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        • Profile picture of the author jimbo13
          ***** Ok I am a slow typist and you have answered and clarified some of what I have written *****


          What Claude said sums it up.

          They are going through sequential steps.

          Do you know what those steps are?

          Have you rehearsed them?

          Do you understand the psychology of them?

          Most likely you do not which is your managers fault to some degree.

          I would not go on any more sits if I was you.

          I would go into the office and get him to 'walk' you through a mock presentation from start to finish explaining each step so you understand the jigsaw.

          Then go and watch him or another rep again and now you will be seeing the presentation in a different light.

          Then go to pub and talk about it.

          Then you do a mock demonstration in the office to him in the morning and with a spring in your step you go and do 3 or 4 sits implementing what you have learned and then get him to go and observe you to polish it up and give you feedback.

          There you go. British Army way of training. We call it EDIP

          Explain - Demonstrate - Imitate - Practice

          Dan
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  • Profile picture of the author Freebiequeen1999
    Well most of us here do say...talk to your sales manager.

    Sometimes it can be in your attitude....you may not realize that you are coming on as nervous, or unsure....it may be that you are NOT picking up on 'hints" or desires ....you may be using rote "objection replies" before the prospect even states an objection - a lot of new salespeople do that and then they have no ammunition left to give

    I don't know how much reading really does....a lot of this is hands on - right there..in their face stuff

    Paint the picture means - you don't say "our kitchens are designed so that the work counters are very spacious and more than one person can cook there"..."you will have areas for cooking and eating"


    and so forth...you personlize it to them to what they said they wanted..\

    "oh this is gonna be so great..finally you two will be able to enjoy cooking together - what will your first dinner be? Bob are gonna show off your best steak on that new built in grill? "

    "Now here the WHOLE FAMILY can hang out and enjoy when we open up this area for the dining.! "

    See I just assumed that "we" are going to "open up" the dining area when "we install" the new kitchen...done deal
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  • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
    Is this one of those jobs where you have to stick to the script?

    If its not - let me know, often times you can build desire with
    nothing more then questions. The right questions at the right
    time can be more effective then any clever "rote" rebuttals.

    and I have read the way you ask questions here ... I think you
    would take to the "questions" technique like a duck to water.
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    • Profile picture of the author kevd10
      Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

      Is this one of those jobs where you have to stick to the script?

      If its not - let me know, often times you can build desire with
      nothing more then questions. The right questions at the right
      time can be more effective then any clever "rote" rebuttals.

      and I have read the way you ask questions here ... I think you
      would take to the "questions" technique like a duck to water.


      There is certain information that we must tell the prospect about the company background etc and a demonstration of the alternatives in the market, but apart from that, we can say pretty much whatever we want to get the sale. Could you tell me more?
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      • Profile picture of the author Scott Stevens
        Op, did the firm have a training programme when you joined? The best firms will spend money on getting their sales staff trained up fully.

        If they havent offered any kind of sales training, maybe look for a firm that does, and if you really want to sell kitchens, well to them instead.

        Whatever happens, dont give up. Being able to sell has got to be one of the most valuable skills as a human being. And learning the art of it will open many doors for you, believe me.
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  • Profile picture of the author yukon
    Banned
    Setup free estimates/appointments with competition & let them try & sell you a new kitchen (act like a noob), record everything on hidden video.

    You could do the same with other sales reps in your own business, have a friend make a call for a free estimate, record it on hidden video. Just make sure you're on vacation for the scheduled appointment.

    When you're done, you'll have a small library of targeted sales pitches to use for your own job.

    The problem while tagging along with other sales reps./managers is they'll never be 100% when they feel like someone is looking over their shoulder.
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  • Profile picture of the author missmiss
    I like running through different alternatives to my product and throwing out little jabs during our sales conversation. As well as benefits over the alternatives.

    Alternative to custom kitchens and bathroom furniture
    - Ikea put it together yourself con breaks after 2 years
    - Home Depot - cons
    etc.

    Good luck.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    Originally Posted by kevd10 View Post

    As discussed in a previous post of mine, I sell kitchens and bathrooms for a large, specialist kitchen firm in the UK.

    We genuinely have the best quality kitchens available anywhere in the region. I do direct selling in homes, positioning myself as a designer. I design a new kitchen on a software interface and show it to prospective customers. The leads come from canvassing and aren't heavily qualified, sometimes not at all.

    On average, our team of salesmen converts around 1 in 3 leads. I am underperforming at present as I am quite new to the whole thing.

    My problem is, when it comes to giving the price, people tend to expect it to be a lot lower than what it is, and I lose the sale.

    My manager says it is a desire building issue.

    Any help appreciated, as I am starting to become negative about the situation and that is putting more and more pressure on the sale.
    Qualify first, sell later.

    Pressure goes on the prospect, not you. They're the one with the problem!

    Are you setting the scene by asking what research they've done? Who they've talked to before you showed up?

    Wouldn't it be useful to you to know what pricing they've seen before yours?

    Do you find out their "preset mental budget" first? Yes, you can change this by showing them value improvements over the discussion, but wouldn't it be useful to know your starting point?

    How much involvement are they having in the design with the software?

    If it's not much, then you can understand why their buy-in might not be that high.

    Are you giving them options all the way along, "Here's the best finish you can get for that model...and if you're concerned about budget, here's the next level down that's almost as good..." They perceive you're on their side, not trying to gouge them with premium solutions.

    You have all the fixin's for a totally collaborative close here.

    If you can see where you're starting from--the Price/budget level initially in the prospect's mind...

    ...get them fully involved in the design process (have they looked at Houzz.com? Set up an account to assemble a gallery of photos of renos they like? renos they don't like? Could you get them to do this BEFORE you showed up for the appointment? Yeah?)

    ...demonstrate you're on their side by giving them multiple finish levels resulting in two or more Prices for the job

    ...and a clear understanding before you begin for both of you what the next step will look like...

    ...do you think that would work? Would that get you a better, more controllable result?
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

      Qualify first, sell later.

      Pressure goes on the prospect, not you. They're the one with the problem!

      Are you setting the scene by asking what research they've done? Who they've talked to before you showed up?

      Wouldn't it be useful to you to know what pricing they've seen before yours?

      Do you find out their "preset mental budget" first? Yes, you can change this by showing them value improvements over the discussion, but wouldn't it be useful to know your starting point?

      How much involvement are they having in the design with the software?

      If it's not much, then you can understand why their buy-in might not be that high.

      Are you giving them options all the way along, "Here's the best finish you can get for that model...and if you're concerned about budget, here's the next level down that's almost as good..." They perceive you're on their side, not trying to gouge them with premium solutions.

      You have all the fixin's for a totally collaborative close here.
      Some very solid advice here.

      To the OP; Much of the sale is made before you start the actual presentation. The qualifying process uncovers price expectations, and established your position in their mind. Your problem isn't in closing, it's in establishing a value for your solution. And that's in the qualifying phase. Study what your manager is doing, before the presentation starts. You may find your answers there,.



      Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

      Sometimes the trainer or partner your matched up with is to far advanced
      for you to learn properly.


      Only the true greats will know it and be able to adjust. Most will crash
      and burn if they attempt to change their rhythm for you.

      Also - depending on how far ahead on the curve they are compared to you
      you might never be able to see it.


      I bet - ( and this is a complete guess ) what you are missing are all
      the subtle conversation maneuvering - When a pro is watching another
      pro do it - even they miss it. IF it was done properly.

      That's a pro - your not a pro, so how are you supposed to see it?

      Before you pull your hair out - see if you can just change who you
      go on calls with.


      Blindly copying stuff does you no good. You have to know why.
      Why it works and why it doesn't work.
      Sometimes I forget how good you are.

      You need to convince your manager to go with you. Every newer rep thinks they are doing everything right. Then I would go with them, and see a dozen gaping wholes in their presentation. Then I would tell them (back at the office) what they were doing wrong, and they would invariably say, "I normally do that". But they don't.

      The advice about going with a few different reps is solid. And having a few different reps go with you, would certainly get most of the bugs out of the presentation.
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      • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post





        Sometimes I forget how good you are.
        The squeaky wheel always gets the grease...
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  • Profile picture of the author gjabiz
    With no background...you've jumped in the deep end of the pool, that is high ticket item.

    The reality is: not everyone is cut out to do this and NOT everyone can learn...or be trained. You can record and listen and memorize the top guy's pitch from start to close, say the exact same thing and get a different result BECAUSE you lack the foundation, as others have pointed out.

    You've been given some good technique and methodology...but,

    I may be wrong, but it sounds like you need to get a good reason why

    you are doing what you are doing, and MORE training or technique isn't going to help until you have a complete change of attitude.

    Have you considered the possibility you've made a mistake with this venture?

    gjabiz


    Originally Posted by kevd10 View Post

    As discussed in a previous post of mine, I sell kitchens and bathrooms for a large, specialist kitchen firm in the UK.

    We genuinely have the best quality kitchens available anywhere in the region. I do direct selling in homes, positioning myself as a designer. I design a new kitchen on a software interface and show it to prospective customers. The leads come from canvassing and aren't heavily qualified, sometimes not at all.

    On average, our team of salesmen converts around 1 in 3 leads. I am underperforming at present as I am quite new to the whole thing.

    My problem is, when it comes to giving the price, people tend to expect it to be a lot lower than what it is, and I lose the sale.

    My manager says it is a desire building issue.

    Any help appreciated, as I am starting to become negative about the situation and that is putting more and more pressure on the sale.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by gjabiz View Post

      With no background...you've jumped in the deep end of the pool, that is high ticket item.

      The reality is: not everyone is cut out to do this and NOT everyone can learn...or be trained. You can record and listen and memorize the top guy's pitch from start to close, say the exact same thing and get a different result BECAUSE you lack the foundation, as others have pointed out.

      You've been given some good technique and methodology...but,

      I may be wrong, but it sounds like you need to get a good reason why

      you are doing what you are doing, and MORE training or technique isn't going to help until you have a complete change of attitude.

      Have you considered the possibility you've made a mistake with this venture?

      gjabiz
      Excellent point. But I have to remember my own history.

      I sold fire alarms for 3 months.....not a single sale (that I remember)
      Then I sold Kirby vacuum cleaners. It took almost 3 months before I made my first sale. Why? I had no idea how to sell, or how sales worked...and I had terrible trainers.

      I made mistakes that would make me throw up, if I saw them today. What a rube I was.

      But I read sales books every day...I took notes every day.....I never stopped learning....from the beginning.
      The only things I had going for me, was intelligence, and desire. I knew I would figure it out eventually.

      But...sales isn't for everyone.
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      • Profile picture of the author gjabiz
        Trumps ignorance 24/7.

        If the desire is there, he'll figure it out. With us, or without us.

        Let's wish him well.

        gjabiz


        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        Excellent point. But I have to remember my own history.

        I sold fire alarms for 3 months.....not a single sale (that I remember)
        Then I sold Kirby vacuum cleaners. It took almost 3 months before I made my first sale. Why? I had no idea how to sell, or how sales worked...and I had terrible trainers.

        I made mistakes that would make me throw up, if I saw them today. What a rube I was.

        But I read sales books every day...I took notes every day.....I never stopped learning....from the beginning.
        The only things I had going for me, was intelligence, and desire. I knew I would figure it out eventually.

        But...sales isn't for everyone.
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        • Profile picture of the author kevd10
          Originally Posted by gjabiz View Post

          Trumps ignorance 24/7.

          If the desire is there, he'll figure it out. With us, or without us.

          Let's wish him well.

          gjabiz


          I love this job. I love the idea of making a living selling and I am fully committed to it.


          I read in a different thread about a certain book called 'How I went from failure to success in selling' or something along those lines.


          I bought that this morning, read the first few chapters and went out and sold a pretty difficult lead this afternoon lol. So hopefully this is the turning point for me.


          The advice in this thread is amazing.
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  • Profile picture of the author Freebiequeen1999
    Yes...at some point one does have to question if this is the right field to be in....

    going for high end, high ticket when you do not have a sales background is not easy

    I have been in (and managed) phone rooms where the newbie went out for a 'break' and never came back

    At one point my (long ago former) company had me take out new sales reps on the road occasionally....
    I had a gal with me in Tampa - I drove us there....we got back to our hotel that night and when I was in the shower she packed and left and left a note - she was on her way to the greyhound bus to get out of selling

    another one snuck out on me while we were eating dinner after a day of appointments LOL...
    she took a cab to the hotel and got her boyfriend to drive over to Naples to pick her up...she finally answered her phone and told me that LOL>> I was getting worried thought she was kidnapped

    This is not for everyone. You have to let rejection go right off you..you have to be able to think on your feet...."read" people...find their key points - pain points...and go for it...when I was a little girl I forced my family and neighbors to buy "ads" and "announcements" in my own little (copy shop) newsletter...I then sold subscriptions for the newsletter

    "Kathy Sweeny's First Holy Communion - Read all about it"

    "The Giglotti Family goes on Vacation to Myrtle Beach - see their photos"

    "Riley Family Tailgates at the Steelers Game - check out their new black and gold sweatshirts"

    Everyone had to buy into this...I would not take no for an answer....sometimes I think they would hide when I hit their doorstep but I returned....LOL

    You gotta like doing this. I even had some little friends try to help me....but they hated it.

    Oh yes...I was also top dog on cookie sales, carnival ticket sales...you name it
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  • Profile picture of the author SalesGod
    step one- stop being negative.
    step two- ride along with top producer, record his presentation, learn all his rebuttles and duplicate. If you say the same things and still arnt closing its probably because he has confidence and you don't.
    step three- record your presentation and I can tell you exactly what your doing wrong and get you closing. I train sales people everyday mainly selling over the phone but have produced in the high 6 figure range back in the day doing outside sales.
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