Selling Will Writing Over The Phone

by AarenE
26 replies
I've just started working for a legal firm who provide will writing services. It's done in a 3 step process.

1. Cold call target demographic and send out brochure through the mail

2. Call the people again to set up an appointment for a home visit

3. Home visit and close the sale

I'm working the phones on step 2, and I have a script that basically says "hello, did you read the brochure?"

I'm finding it difficult to build desire for this product as the language I use has to be very tactful.

How would you conduct this phone call to generate some desire for a will? What questions can I ask to make the person feel good about a service like this and book a home appointment?
#phone #selling #writing
  • Profile picture of the author Matthew North
    Originally Posted by AarenE View Post

    How would you conduct this phone call to generate some desire for a will? What questions can I ask to make the person feel good about a service like this and book a home appointment?
    First of all, how much junk do you receive in your own mailbox, and what's the easiest way of getting a telemarketer off the phone when they've been asked to receive something?

    DO YOU MIND IF I ASK YOU A FEW QUESTIONS TO SEE IF THIS A FIT FOR YOU OR NOT OKAY THANKS:

    What protection do they have in place at the moment?
    Why did they buy that protection/insurance? Tell me more.
    What's going to happen to their assests if they don't have a will in place?
    What will that mean for their family? Could you give me an example?
    How is the family going to manage, and how much is it going to cost them in terms of dollars and the emotional investment while grieving?
    What would happen to your investments if someone close were to suddenly pass away?
    How do you feel about that?

    Make them experience the negative emotions first and they will have the 'Desire' to move back into their bubble of security and control.
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    • Profile picture of the author AarenE
      Originally Posted by Matthew North View Post

      First of all, how much junk do you receive in your own mailbox, and what's the easiest way of getting a telemarketer off the phone when they've been asked to receive something?

      DO YOU MIND IF I ASK YOU A FEW QUESTIONS TO SEE IF THIS A FIT FOR YOU OR NOT OKAY THANKS:

      What protection do they have in place at the moment?
      Why did they buy that protection/insurance? Tell me more.
      What's going to happen to their assests if they don't have a will in place?
      What will that mean for their family? Could you give me an example?
      How is the family going to manage, and how much is it going to cost them in terms of dollars and the emotional investment while grieving?
      What would happen to your investments if someone close were to suddenly pass away?
      How do you feel about that?

      Make them experience the negative emotions first and they will have the 'Desire' to move back into their bubble of security and control.
      Good questions. Some of them feel very intrusive, as I'm literally talking about what happens when they pass away. I'm in my 20's so death isn't something I think about a lot... I feel that's a roadblock I'll have to overcome very quickly to succeed here. Otherwise I feel I'm reflecting my own fear of talking about death to the clients.

      Thank you.
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  • Profile picture of the author sweetcrabhoney18
    If they go to the home of the buyer do they also notarize the will once it's created? Or is the buyer responsible for that?

    Wills are scary and can be very depressing for some people but they are a need. Explain to the buyers the will laws within their state as well as the county. State facts about how often wills are disregarded. And of course ask questions that display the importance of a good legal will.
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    • Profile picture of the author AarenE
      Originally Posted by sweetcrabhoney18 View Post

      If they go to the home of the buyer do they also notarize the will once it's created? Or is the buyer responsible for that?

      Wills are scary and can be very depressing for some people but they are a need. Explain to the buyers the will laws within their state as well as the county. State facts about how often wills are disregarded. And of course ask questions that display the importance of a good legal will.
      Yes the entire process including the notary signature is handled by the firm from start to finish.
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  • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
    Originally Posted by AarenE View Post


    1. Cold call target demographic and send out brochure through the mail

    2. Call the people again to set up an appointment for a home visit

    3. Home visit and close the sale

    I'm working the phones on step 2, and I have a script that basically says "hello, did you read the brochure?"

    I'm finding it difficult to build desire for this product as the language I use has to be very tactful.

    How would you conduct this phone call to generate some desire for a will? What questions can I ask to make the person feel good about a service like this and book a home appointment?
    There are what appears to be 3 major holes
    in your process...

    1 Not enough understanding what the prospects wants
    on the first call

    2 Sending written material makes them go cold

    3 On second call it's hard to recover because you didn't get the first call right.

    If you get the first call right, you wouldn't need to send anything in the post
    if you got the first call right because you would of found out what the prospect desired most and you would of recommended some options to get the most desired outcome.

    Best,
    Doctor E. Vile
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    • Profile picture of the author AarenE
      Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

      There are what appears to be 3 major holes
      in your process...

      1 Not enough understanding what the prospects wants
      on the first call

      2 Sending written material makes them go cold

      3 On second call it's hard to recover because you didn't get the first call right.

      If you get the first call right, you wouldn't need to send anything in the post
      if you got the first call right because you would of found out what the prospect desired most and you would of recommended some options to get the most desired outcome.

      Best,
      Doctor E. Vile
      There are three main departments in this company. A group of pure cold callers, dialling to a list of people who are over 40, fit a certain income threshold and have at some point indicated interest in getting a will written up. These diallers send out the brochures to interested people... and their details are saved as "warm leads".



      And it those leads that I'm dialling to start a conversation. Sometimes I will dial a number and it feel's like I'm calling cold again as they've forgotten what they've been sent or say "thanks I had a look but not interested, can you take me off your list?".

      How would you suggest I conduct a call like this?

      My role is to set an appointment on the call. I get paid £25 for every appointment I set. I have so far set 3, which is a good start but I've winged it and the feedback I've been given is that too many leads have been wasted.

      I'm willing to do whatever it takes and learn. This role is a break for me, as I was working a manual labour job 7 days a week from 6am to 8pm hauling fruit and vegetables onto trucks and palettes at the market.
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      • Profile picture of the author jimbo13
        Originally Posted by AarenE View Post

        I have so far set 3, which is a good start but I've winged it and the feedback I've been given is that too many leads have been wasted.
        So what is everyone else doing and why haven't they told you?

        If your boss believes you to be wasting leads then he is comparing you with someone or everyone else.

        That would be your first port of call to improvement.

        Dan
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  • Profile picture of the author DABK
    You didn't define 'target demographic' or said what the brochure said.

    I once coached an attorney who sold wills, estate planning.

    Among other things, I said: don't sell wills, sell 'take control.'

    She got significantly better results...


    And match the pitch to them... different pitch for gay couples (that was a few years ago, gays couldn't marry); different pitch for business owners than for teachers, etc.

    So, what do you know about them before you call them?

    Originally Posted by AarenE View Post

    I've just started working for a legal firm who provide will writing services. It's done in a 3 step process.

    1. Cold call target demographic and send out brochure through the mail

    2. Call the people again to set up an appointment for a home visit

    3. Home visit and close the sale

    I'm working the phones on step 2, and I have a script that basically says "hello, did you read the brochure?"

    I'm finding it difficult to build desire for this product as the language I use has to be very tactful.

    How would you conduct this phone call to generate some desire for a will? What questions can I ask to make the person feel good about a service like this and book a home appointment?
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  • Profile picture of the author Peter Lessard
    First recommendation is buy lunch for the top closer, become friends, site beside him, listen, listen listen... steal his notebook... you get the picture.

    Now a very rough possible approach to get the imagination going:

    "Hey Steve, it's Aeren from ABC company. Listen, just calling to apologize for the delay. We had promised to get someone out to you after sending the brochure but we have been swamped. To keep these delays from happening in the future we are now calling ahead to make sure we are on the same page. If you had to choose what would be your number one reason for doing this? Is it to financially protect loved ones? More about keeping the stress and possible conflicts at a minimum or more about your own piece of mind?"

    Something like this makes a meeting a foregone conclusion and lets THEM raise there hand about concerns and reasons why. They now pitch themselves, At this point you do NOT need to have any answers. You just say ok perfect, this really helps and set the appointment.
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    • Profile picture of the author AarenE
      Originally Posted by Peter Lessard View Post

      "Hey Steve, it's Aeren from ABC company. Listen, just calling to apologize for the delay. We had promised to get someone out to you after sending the brochure but we have been swamped. To keep these delays from happening in the future we are now calling ahead to make sure we are on the same page. If you had to choose what would be your number one reason for doing this? Is it to financially protect loved ones? More about keeping the stress and possible conflicts at a minimum or more about your own piece of mind?"

      Something like this makes a meeting a foregone conclusion and lets THEM raise there hand about concerns and reasons why. They now pitch themselves, At this point you do NOT need to have any answers. You just say ok perfect, this really helps and set the appointment.
      I owe you and Ewen a drink at least. I've used a variation of your wording in my own script and also the question "So that I can help you best is it ok to ask you a few questions so that I can understand your future plans and what exactly your
      future wishes are and then I can recommend some options?"...

      That's leading to a lot more open conversations and appointments. Now and again I'm getting the objection "No thanks, I'll read your brochure and call you once I'm ready" - I think this is to do with the lead having accepted the mailing of a brochure to them just to get the cold callers off the phone.
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  • Profile picture of the author AlphaWarrior
    Not trying to be cute, but if you are not a lawyer, how can you answer any questions?

    Do you know what Wills cover and do not cover? Wills do not cover everything.

    Do you know how your state laws may override any provision in a Will? A person may want one thing, but state law may not allow it.

    AarenE, I assume that whoever you are working for is a lawyer or has at least hired a lawyer to talk with people and prepare the Wills. If not, you may be guilty of practicing law without a license.

    I believe that the best thing to do is to find out what a person's main concern is, and then set up a time for the lawyer to talk to him/her.
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    • Profile picture of the author jimbo13
      Originally Posted by AlphaWarrior View Post

      Not trying to be cute, but if you are not a lawyer, how can you answer any questions?

      Do you know how your state laws may override any provision in a Will? A person may want one thing, but state law may not allow it.
      Originally Posted by AarenE View Post

      I've just started working for a legal firm who provide will writing services. It's done in a 3 step process.
      Originally Posted by AarenE View Post

      I get paid £25 for every appointment I set.
      Does that answer your questions?

      Dan
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    • Profile picture of the author DABK
      The first sentence in this thread: "I've just started working for a legal firm who provide will writing services."



      Originally Posted by AlphaWarrior View Post

      Not trying to be cute, but if you are not a lawyer, how can you answer any questions?

      Do you know what Wills cover and do not cover? Wills do not cover everything.

      Do you know how your state laws may override any provision in a Will? A person may want one thing, but state law may not allow it.

      AarenE, I assume that whoever you are working for is a lawyer or has at least hired a lawyer to talk with people and prepare the Wills. If not, you may be guilty of practicing law without a license.

      I believe that the best thing to do is to find out what a person's main concern is, and then set up a time for the lawyer to talk to him/her.
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  • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
    Apparently the laws for lawyer marketing are different in the US than they are in the UK.

    I bet they could improve their brochure with a good call to action so
    they get more incoming calls. I did appointment setting for a company
    where I called people who filled out and sent in a little form. That was still
    difficult - a lot of people forgot they sent the form in and/or did not like getting a call.
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  • Profile picture of the author DavidZin
    That's good question.This is something that has affected every person who has made an outbound call at some point in their career – and it affects some people every day! If you’re the sort of person that has to make a large number of outbound calls in which you’re saying the same or similar things on each call, this is probably affecting you right now!

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  • Profile picture of the author AlphaWarrior
    jimbo13 and DABK, you both miss the point. The point is not does he work for a lawyer.

    The point is that unless the OP is a lawyer, how can he answer any questions?

    For example, the OP calls someone and the person asks "I am in such and such situation, do I need a Will?" How can the OP really answer the question unless he is a lawyer. Law is not simple. It is complex. Lawyers go to law school for 3 years and then have to pass an exam in order to practice law. There is local law, state law, federal law, law made by legislatures, law made by courts, law made by government agencies, rules for evidence, rules for court procedures, etc. The list is almost endless. And facts make a difference. What is correct in one case may not be correct in another case.

    Despite most lawyers claim that everyone needs a Will (those lawyers just want to get your money), not everyone needs a Will.

    Also, some laws do, in fact, override what a person says in his/her Will. And not everything is covered by a Will.

    The best thing for the OP to do is to find out a person's concerns and then set up a time for the lawyer to meet with them.
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    • Profile picture of the author DABK
      I am not missing the point. The OP can be taught to answer enough questions to get prospects to meet with a lawyer.

      The lawyer, then, decides if they do, indeed, need a will and how to set it up.

      The lawyer makes more per hour when he/she does the wills, not when he/she qualifies leads. Therefore, he/she has hired the OP to do the qualifying.

      It's a smart way to go about things.

      Originally Posted by AlphaWarrior View Post

      jimbo13 and DABK, you both miss the point. The point is not does he work for a lawyer.

      The point is that unless the OP is a lawyer, how can he answer any questions?

      For example, the OP calls someone and the person asks "I am in such and such situation, do I need a Will?" How can the OP really answer the question unless he is a lawyer. Law is not simple. It is complex. Lawyers go to law school for 3 years and then have to pass an exam in order to practice law. There is local law, state law, federal law, law made by legislatures, law made by courts, law made by government agencies, rules for evidence, rules for court procedures, etc. The list is almost endless. And facts make a difference. What is correct in one case may not be correct in another case.

      Despite most lawyers claim that everyone needs a Will (those lawyers just want to get your money), not everyone needs a Will.

      Also, some laws do, in fact, override what a person says in his/her Will. And not everything is covered by a Will.

      The best thing for the OP to do is to find out a person's concerns and then set up a time for the lawyer to meet with them.
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    • Profile picture of the author rseigel
      Originally Posted by AlphaWarrior View Post

      jimbo13 and DABK, you both miss the point. The point is not does he work for a lawyer.

      The point is that unless the OP is a lawyer, how can he answer any questions?
      Clearly some people can't stand being wrong.

      2. Call the people again to set up an appointment for a home visit

      3. Home visit and close the sale (no doubt by a real lawyer)

      I'm working the phones on step 2, and I have a script that basically says "hello, did you read the brochure?"
      You don't seriously expect a lawyer to do their own telemarketing/appointment setting do you?
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      Cheers,

      Ron

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      • Profile picture of the author AarenE
        Thanks for the interest, help and replies.

        My role is to book appointments for the legal consultants who perform the home visits - depending on the type of documents and services requested, that would also include a lawyer as required by UK law.

        The top producer works the numbers. It's human nature to only think about getting a will written up when you have friends or family get diagnosed with illnesses or pass away. Those triggers will encourage people to seek the services of a will writing company. What I wanted to discuss is how I could engineer a conversation to build desire for a will without such an "event" in that persons life.
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        • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
          Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post

          Estate planning details and "protecting" property is not really "common knowledge" in the UK.

          Those that are aware - are much more likely to already have a will.

          7 out of 10 people in the UK don't.

          I didn't suggest "walking on eggshells", and it would make no sense being "afraid or unconfident" - as you said there is absolutely no need to be.

          My point was.

          The "prospect" is getting a cold or maybe a warm call from somebody they don't know.

          Who is talking about very personal details and vividly pointing out what could be a catastrophic financial loss.

          So, I said be "diplomatic" because it's really not good to be seen rightly or wrongly as a stranger trying a hard sell scaremongering pitch.

          Your suggestion - "tactful" would also be a good tactic.


          Steve

          Sorry, Steve. I was gearing my post to the OP's concerns addressed in his posts
          below, while using the info you provided.

          I may have extrapolated too much about making the house "safe" and thought
          most laypeople would be aware of needing to make the house "safe" and other
          estate issues. Advising friends to get a will and so on.

          In the US, at least amongst most of the people I know, people seem to be familiar
          in a general way with estate planning issues, inheritances, and taxes. Conversations
          among friends like "You know Joe's Uncle Don died about a year ago and he did not
          have a will. He had told Joe that he was his favorite nephew and he would leave him
          a good chunk if he ever passes on. Joe's just tired of the whole thing because it's all
          still tied up in probate and Uncle Don's ex-wife is......"

          So, to OP, most people in their 30's on up, and some in their 20's, have probably dealt
          with a death in the family, or at least a friend's death in the family, and at least a little bit
          of estate issues. So just talk about it. Diplomatically/tactfully, of course, but just talk.
          Given that you think about it, I'm sure you'll be considerate.

          Originally Posted by AarenE View Post

          Good questions. Some of them feel very intrusive, as I'm literally talking about what happens when they pass away. I'm in my 20's so death isn't something I think about a lot... I feel that's a roadblock I'll have to overcome very quickly to succeed here. Otherwise I feel I'm reflecting my own fear of talking about death to the clients.

          Thank you.
          Originally Posted by AarenE View Post

          Thanks for the interest, help and replies.

          My role is to book appointments for the legal consultants who perform the home visits - depending on the type of documents and services requested, that would also include a lawyer as required by UK law.

          The top producer works the numbers. It's human nature to only think about getting a will written up when you have friends or family get diagnosed with illnesses or pass away. Those triggers will encourage people to seek the services of a will writing company. What I wanted to discuss is how I could engineer a conversation to build desire for a will without such an "event" in that persons life.
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          "If you think you're the smartest person in the room, then you're probably in the wrong room."

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  • Apologies for jumping in here.

    But I know a fair bit about UK wills.


    And one big secret is not to call it a "will" instead say "estate planning" (it's less intrusive and tends not to kick in unwanted thoughts, feelings and comments).

    In the UK there are three big emotional triggers.

    The first one is - "Have I made all the necessary arrangements for my demise" (can I pop off knowing that everything is organised to minimise the worry and stress for everyone)

    Next is "I need to make sure my money and wordly goods go to the people I want them to go to and not to the people I don't"

    (it's often the case, even more so when they are asked - that people want specific amounts of money and items to go to particular relations and friends. And they don't want "that bleeping so and so grabbing my gold watch, I want that to go to ____").

    The last and most important and many are completely unaware and how critical this is - protect the family home.

    If the property is "unprotected" a sale could be "forced" in order to pay for future care home costs for the surviving beloved one.

    I won't go into all the legalise in how this can be prevented.

    But if all the affairs are put in the right order the house can be "safe"


    You can imagine how relieved people are when they know this can be done.

    A good telephone script can diplomatically indicate why it MUST be done (with the dire and dismal consequences if it isn't).

    And the initial brochure should also highlight just how vital it is.


    You may well find people start calling rather than having to be called (be good if you take these call so you can emphasise all the details and set up "red hot, raring to go" appointments and not lose any commissions).

    Or start booking the appointments very quickly - again so you get your commission.


    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
      Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post

      Apologies for jumping in here.

      But I know a fair bit about UK wills.


      And one big secret is not to call it a "will" instead say "estate planning" (it's less intrusive and tends not to kick in unwanted thoughts, feelings and comments).

      In the UK there are three big emotional triggers.

      The first one is - "Have I made all the necessary arrangements for my demise" (can I pop off knowing that everything is organised to minimise the worry and stress for everyone)

      Next is "I need to make sure my money and wordly goods go to the people I want them to go to and not to the people I don't"

      (it's often the case, even more so when they are asked - that people want specific amounts of money and items to go to particular relations and friends. And they don't want "that bleeping so and so grabbing my gold watch, I want that to go to ____").

      The last and most important and many are completely unaware and how critical this is - protect the family home.

      If the property is "unprotected" a sale could be "forced" in order to pay for future care home costs for the surviving beloved one.

      I won't go into all the legalise in how this can be prevented.

      But if all the affairs are put in the right order the house can be "safe"


      You can imagine how relieved people are when they know this can be done.

      A good telephone script can diplomatically indicate why it MUST be done (with the dire and dismal consequences if it isn't).

      And the initial brochure should also highlight just how vital it is.


      You may well find people start calling rather than having to be called (be good if you take these call so you can emphasise all the details and set up "red hot, raring to go" appointments and not lose any commissions).

      Or start booking the appointments very quickly - again so you get your commission.


      Steve
      Since things like making the house "safe", and the other estate planning issues, are really common knowledge, I think you should be able to talk about things in a matter of fact way. Tactful, of course,
      but you don't have to walk on egg shells and come across as afraid or unconfident.

      As the others have said, take a top producer to lunch. Maybe tag along as they work and listen to the tones of their voice and body language and the way they phrase things...
      Signature

      "If you think you're the smartest person in the room, then you're probably in the wrong room."

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  • Estate planning details and "protecting" property is not really "common knowledge" in the UK.

    Those that are aware - are much more likely to already have a will.

    7 out of 10 people in the UK don't.

    I didn't suggest "walking on eggshells", and it would make no sense being "afraid or unconfident" - as you said there is absolutely no need to be.

    My point was.

    The "prospect" is getting a cold or maybe a warm call from somebody they don't know.

    Who is talking about very personal details and vividly pointing out what could be a catastrophic financial loss.

    So, I said be "diplomatic" because it's really not good to be seen rightly or wrongly as a stranger trying a hard sell scaremongering pitch.

    Your suggestion - "tactful" would also be a good tactic.


    Steve
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  • Two more tips on the noble art of marketing will writing/getting appointments.

    The prospect is in their 20's, 30's or 40's and death is not their foremost thought ("we're living much longer - so for goodness sake no great need to worry about keeling over just yet")

    You agree and point out the most likeliest cause of death would be an accident. They are stacks of figures and possibilities that can add credibility to this ("dammit, that could happen, better get my affairs organised")


    Another major objection to writing a will is -

    "Not necessary, because it all automatically goes to my spouse which is my dying wish, anyway they would kill me if it didn't"

    You agree, and then say -"when you both look back over your lives, is their anyone who was very "special" and you would like to thank them (with a gift, or a bit of money) when it's time to say the big good bye?"

    The key words to use are "special" and "thank" because it stirs up the emotions. And it really can have a visceral effect (yes I know just reading this has brought people into your thoughts).

    And usually the prospects have a "list" of people who meant a great deal to them (who wouldn't normally be beneficiaries).

    And voila - suddenly and surprisingly urgently they want them included in their last will and testament.

    Which was something they never thought they needed.

    But now they really do want it expertly prepared and completed.

    Because life wouldn't have quite the same satisfaction, gratitude and fulfilment without one.


    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author AarenE
      Steve your insights are very profound. They've given me a new paradigm. Up until now I was seeing the task of getting a will written as a chore and something "one has to do" at some point.

      The idea that people can take pleasure in saying thank you to their loved ones through a will is very obvious but completely ignored by me (and by the training given to me at the firm)

      I'm quite excited about making calls come Monday. Stories and emotions are attached to heirlooms or trinkets... and getting people to reminisce about them will help me to build trust.
      I can even answer the objection "I don't need a will" with something like "I understand, most people don't... most of our clients don't until they remember a story or piece of jewellery that they'd absolutely want to pass down...

      I'll take some time this weekend to expand. In my interview I said I'd be an asset that would pay for my desk 10 times over and would aim to be their top guy within 6 months. I'm sticking to that goal.
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  • I think you are going to have a rather good week (make that months, even years) starting on Monday! ***

    If not, I'll take a break from writing epic masterpieces - and you can take over.

    I'll do a quick rewrite of the will writing/estate planning brochure - putting in all the logical and real emotional benefits - and send it out.

    And have great fun phoning the prospects and getting the appointments.

    Better still just wait for them to call - then book them in.


    Steve


    *** There is of course a caveat or for will writers a codicil - selling is and alway will be a numbers game.

    But if you enjoy making the calls, have a perfect presentation (keep improving it) and of course an outstanding product - the odds of consistently high success go dramatically in your favour.
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