Is Cold-Calling Still Effective?

151 replies
It seems as if the era of cold-calling has passed... or am I just doing it wrong?

I've called plenty of businesses over the past week and I'm either just ringing through, or people aren't interested at all.

I understand it's a numbers game.. but is it still viable? Is anyone else having success with cold calls?
#coldcalling #effective
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  • Profile picture of the author jmosticc22
    I think it still can be, depends on what you are selling. If you do your research and come up with a targeted list of customers you can win with it. If your selling things people need they will listen from there it is up to you to close the sale.
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    • Profile picture of the author codyhay
      And that's the point one should remember before selling products & services using the cold calling techniques.
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    Originally Posted by RonGold View Post

    It seems as if the era of cold-calling has passed... or am I just doing it wrong?

    I've called plenty of businesses over the past week and I'm either just ringing through, or people aren't interested at all.

    I understand it's a numbers game.. but is it still viable? Is anyone else having success with cold calls?
    For some reason, about once a year, this identical question gets asked, and the same answers are given.

    Enjoy.
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    • Profile picture of the author GordonJ
      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      For some reason, about once a year, this identical question gets asked, and the same answers are given.

      Enjoy.
      https://www.warriorforum.com/offline...ctiveness.html
      Ah yes. I see it was the OLD ME who responded back then, when I was gjabiz, but know that Infocision is still making millions with cold calling. And many others are banging it out of the park too.

      Originally Posted by RonGold View Post

      It seems as if the era of cold-calling has passed... or am I just doing it wrong?

      I've called plenty of businesses over the past week and I'm either just ringing through, or people aren't interested at all.

      I understand it's a numbers game.. but is it still viable? Is anyone else having success with cold calls?
      The era of cold calling HAS passed, for those who can't do it.

      Maybe they aren't interested in what you are offering because __________ ?

      Don't want, don't need, you haven't given them a good reason?

      Of course, choosing the WHAT to sell goes a long way toward cold calling efficacy.

      With the restaurant Chalk Boards business, there is little sales resistance, because it is FREE. So that takes the fear out of cold calling, which is one of the main reasons why some struggle with it, they stink of desperation for a sale, which turns everyone off.

      If anyone has had success in the past, they will succeed today. It is, after all, just talking to people. Talk in a way that INTERESTS THEM.

      Speak to their needs, wants, what is in it for them...and it will always be a good time to make cold calls, simply because, MOST can't.

      Or don't know how.

      GordonJ
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by GordonJ View Post

        Speak to their needs, wants, what is in it for them...and it will always be a good time to make cold calls, simply because, MOST can't.

        Or don't know how.

        GordonJ
        Cold calling is one of those skills that few people in sales develop.

        By cold calling, I mean phoning people that are not expecting your call, and have not requested information.

        I've heard people say "cold calling" when they meant calling their old customers, or calling people that have requested information.

        My God, a list of old customers is worth its weight in gold. A list of people that requested information from you is worth its weight in gold.

        In fact, to me, any list that has a common factor that you can link to (like past customers of a competitor, or people who regularly buy what you sell, or use your service) is worth at least ten times as much as a cold list of names in your category (like "small business owners").

        For example, if you sold local online marketing services, a list of small business owners that pay for premium online listings in the online Yellow Pages or Yelp, or Homeadvisor listed advertisers would be businesses that have proven that they buy leads and advertise online.
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  • Profile picture of the author palmtreelife
    I think it can be still viable if you can get people to pick up the phone. There's not a lot a cold caller can do to increase their rate of pick ups. Back in the day, everyone answered their phone. Then caller ID came out and most would still answer, but would take a couple rings longer to see who was calling. Then people would block their numbers, but people would still answer for fear of missing an important call.

    Now though? Wow...no one enjoys talking on the phone. Most people don't have a landline anymore. Most cell phones are on silent or vibrate so they won't be disturbed watching Netflix. Even if the person WANTS to talk to the incoming caller, they will still let it ring out and call back a little later when they're completely free.

    The way we communicate now is through text and email because no one wants to talk on the phone. So, if you can someone get someone to pick up the phone, that's half the battle won right there.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by palmtreelife View Post

      I think it can be still viable if you can get people to pick up the phone. There's not a lot a cold caller can do to increase their rate of pick ups. Back in the day, everyone answered their phone. Then caller ID came out and most would still answer, but would take a couple rings longer to see who was calling. Then people would block their numbers, but people would still answer for fear of missing an important call.

      Now though? Wow...no one enjoys talking on the phone. Most people don't have a landline anymore. Most cell phones are on silent or vibrate so they won't be disturbed watching Netflix. Even if the person WANTS to talk to the incoming caller, they will still let it ring out and call back a little later when they're completely free.

      The way we communicate now is through text and email because no one wants to talk on the phone. So, if you can someone get someone to pick up the phone, that's half the battle won right there.
      If you sell to businesses, they still pick up the phone. Old people still pick up the phone.

      And cold calling to residents is going to get you a lot of dials, and only a few phone presentations/appointments.

      Nowadays either the consumer (if you sell to a consumer) either requests information first (easy to do with direct mail, Facebook, or PPC ads), or they have bought from your company before.

      But selling to business owners? They still answer the phone.
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      • Profile picture of the author RonGold
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        If you sell to businesses, they still pick up the phone. Old people still pick up the phone.

        And cold calling to residents is going to get you a lot of dials, and only a few phone presentations/appointments.

        Nowadays either the consumer (if you sell to a consumer) either requests information first (easy to do with direct mail, Facebook, or PPC ads), or they have bought from your company before.

        But selling to business owners? They still answer the phone.

        All I have been targeting are business owners - it just seems like the demographic is getting a little younger. They are more "tech savvy" and it shows; maybe I need to put an artsy website together lol.


        I'm still having some success, just not to the degree I was anticipating. I guess that's why they call it cold-calling!
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      • Profile picture of the author palmtreelife
        If you sell to businesses, they still pick up the phone. Old people still pick up the phone.
        Yes, you're correct. I don't do very much B2B or marketing to old people, and sometimes overlook some of these strategies. That's why I like a forum like this because there's always going to be someone who will say "Yeah, but..." and enlighten us to another angle of the sale.

        ....and I'm grateful that someone is often you who can "argue" or disagree without insulting anyone.
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    • Profile picture of the author Robert Herrie
      Cold Calling is a method of the past. Humans are very intelligemnt these days. If the phone they carry in their pocket and text with and surf the net with every single day begins to ring during their very hectic life. Someone they know better be on the other end. I personally get a minimum of ten calls every single day. If you answer the phone with a single "Hello!" the phone will drop your call. But if you say "Hello,...Hello" then this will connect you directly with a random caller who is sitting in the call center.
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by Robert Herrie View Post

        I personally get a minimum of ten calls every single day. If you answer the phone with a single "Hello!" the phone will drop your call. But if you say "Hello,...Hello" then this will connect you directly with a random caller who is sitting in the call center.
        I get about 20 robo calls a day. I also get several cold calls from people in other countries named "Chip", that ask to speak to the owner...or ask to speak to "Cloud Whiteaker".

        Of course, I just hang up. But a couple of times a month, I get a call from someone with a company name I recognize, speaking clear English, that knows my name.....and I'll talk to them for a minute.

        There are huge companies that use cold calling very effectively. Personally, it's not my thing (although I cold knocked on doors for decades), but it still works well, or major companies would stop doing it.

        Even people in other countries that call me because I bought VIAGRA...once...20 years ago....must be making it work, because I still get calls. And their name is still "Chip".
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  • Profile picture of the author SEOptimization@1
    Cold calling used to work 10 years back but not these days however, the niche you are pitching to and your services might make an impact.

    Good luck.
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  • To say thing like "it still works, only cowards do not like it...blah,blah.."

    It might still work but is it as easy as it was 10,20,30 years ago? No way. It got saturated. It got harder. They tuned out.

    The world is forever changing....old school sales tactics of the 40-50's were not as effective in the 80,90's etc....it evolved and i think the time of the cold call is coming to an end.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by offmarketinvestor View Post


      It might still work but is it as easy as it was 10,20,30 years ago? No way. It got saturated. It got harder. They tuned out.
      What has changed is that now consumers have a Do Not Call List...and caller ID. And businesses get lots of recorded calls.

      But callers also have access to dialing software. Cold callers have access to better qualified lists with names of who to contact. The game changes, but human nature doesn't.

      Cold calling is essentially just talking to strangers, whether it's by phone, e-mail, in person....it works well enough to do...but there are better ways.


      "it still works, only cowards do not like it...blah,blah.."


      Most of the people I hear disparaging it are either people who don't do it, or people that are tired of getting calls.

      On the other hand, the vast majority of people who cold call on the phone are terrible at it, and are trained by others that are terrible at it (or not trained at all). So it usually ends up being a thoroughly unpleasant chore for the caller, and mental torture for the person called.

      And, although these are plenty of examples of companies making cold calls work. There are so many other prospecting methods that are far more pleasant and effective...I wonder why people still cold call strangers.

      Added later; I decided to actually count the number of robo calls I got yesterday. 14. Mostly selling some form of online listing or SEO services. And..about half say nothing, because of the way I answer the phone. (or I hang up before the call is transferred).
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  • Profile picture of the author chuckholmes
    It still works, but isn't anywhere near as effective as it used to be. I still get cold calls, but they are mostly auto dialers and I always hang up on them.

    You should take the time to learn marketing so you can be the welcomed guest, not the uninvited pest.

    Of all the "old school" things I still do, I would say that direct mail is still the most effective.

    Just my two cents.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by chuckholmes View Post

      It still works, but isn't anywhere near as effective as it used to be. I still get cold calls, but they are mostly auto dialers and I always hang up on them.

      You should take the time to learn marketing so you can be the welcomed guest, not the uninvited pest.

      Of all the "old school" things I still do, I would say that direct mail is still the most effective.

      Just my two cents.
      I agree completely. In fact, the single greatest jump I ever got in sales was when I started applying marketing principles to selling.

      And most people I know that "cold call" today, are actually calling leads that were generated by direct mail, PPC ads, or Facebook ads. To me, not really cold leads at all.

      And the direct mail leads are always more solid than those gathered online.

      Yup, if you can get them to call you first, for any reason, the dynamic is completely changed in your favor. One way to simulate this when cold calling is to call leads that are made up of past customers...or customers of competitors.

      A list of buyers (of just about anything related to your offer) greatly increases your odds of them buying from you.


      And......when I said that the single greatest jump I ever got in sales was when I started applying marketing principles to selling? It also goes that for marketers, the biggest jumps will come when they learn how to sell face to face.

      I was at a Dan Kennedy event when he was talking about copywriters. He said (from the stage) that he would rather have a 53 year old vacuum cleaner salesman write the copy "Because he knows how to sell something". He was talking about me, as we talked about it earlier that day.

      A related insight was (when I was speaking to a group of advertising salespeople), that their most profitable expertise would be if they learned how to create ads that sell something. An almost universal travesty is that ad salespeople never learn how to advertise. If they did, they would never have to cold call, because the demand for their services would never stop.

      My 2 cents.
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  • Profile picture of the author RaZamoZ
    cold calling will always work.

    In my opinion cold calling is better than email marketing.

    Don't expect to make high ticket sales without making phone calls.

    Even if you've tried cold calling and not working for you, you should of course try a new strategy.

    But cold calling isn't dead, it works all the time. it's just a numbers game, you can't close everyone.
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  • Profile picture of the author DWolfe
    If cold calling is dead how come here in NJ at least 3-4 companies are advertising on Craigslist looking to hire people. If these business are dying, they would be laying off instead of hiring. Just my .02
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  • Profile picture of the author LEE BYRON
    Why not?
    Cold Calling belongs to outbound marketing. However, internet marketing belongs to inbound marketing.
    Obviously combine both of them are the best solutions.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dave Allen
    Cold calling can work, of course.

    I've found when you take the time to identify those businesses who need your services, that's clearly half the battle. Then, I make sure my spiel is short, sweet and offers a benefit that causes the person to either listen more and engage in the conversation, or ask if I could call back at a better time.

    Or, they simply aren't interested.

    Move on.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ashley John
    Cold calling is effective but based on the products what you are selling, nowadays people them self search on google and get product instead of waiting for any calls.
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  • Profile picture of the author RobertRay
    I think that it can be effective, but sometimes it's just a waste of time. It's better analyze your target audience and improve your service.
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  • Profile picture of the author myob
    I do cold calling extensively, and it can be very effective for driving new business. For example, after a successful sale in a home or business, my team hits up several homes/businesses in the area with our network marketing products and/or opportunity. We collect phone numbers and referrals for followup calls. There is almost no competition.
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  • Profile picture of the author winagain
    I tried cold calling once, even had a small team to do the calls.
    Totally hated it. The response was very low, and expenses high.

    I do not recommend it to anyone
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by winagain View Post

      I tried cold calling once, even had a small team to do the calls.
      Totally hated it. The response was very low, and expenses high.

      I do not recommend it to anyone

      I used to cold call to set appointments. And i hired people to cold call for me...again, to set appointments. these were true cold calls out of the phone book (remember those?)

      When I made the calls (after several years selling) about one out of four people I talked to made an appointment with me. They weren't interested in my product, but they wanted a gift I was offering them for their time. It was a bribe. And it worked.

      When I hired appointment setters to make the same calls...the same script...to the same people..they would average one appointment an hour..or about a 6% set rate. It was miserable work for them. And it was miserable for me to listen to them on the phone.

      I started getting referrals from my customers. These were names of people that had already agreed to see me, to help their friend (my customer) earn a premium (maybe a $300 value).

      At first, I just dropped by their home to show my product. Usually, they wold let me in right then. And they (if they bought too) would give me names of referrals that they would talk to before I dropped by.

      To save time, I started calling these referrals, to make an appointment. I ended up, after several months, with hundreds of referrals that already agreed to see me...and my schedule was packed all day and every evening.

      So I had the brilliant idea to hire someone to call all of these people who had already agreed to see me....so I would be free to just go on appointments.

      Can anyone guess what happened?

      In less than a week she burned through all of my names. By the next week, I had no appointments with referrals, and lots of customers that were expecting a premium, but didn't have the referral appointments to earn it.

      I had to fire the girl (who had no idea she had killed my business), and start over again.

      Soooo what did Claude learn? Call your own damn referrals. 80% of the referrals I got, agreed to a presentation...and 80% of those people bought. Never trust anyone else to call them.

      There are lots of industries that buy leads . These are people that have expressed at least a mild interest in what's being sold, and are expecting a salesperson to call. These leads cost anywhere from $20-$40 each. Personally, I'd never trust these leads to a caller working for me. At $20 a name, I'd call myself.
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  • Profile picture of the author ferdystrategy
    In my journey, indeed, my call is rejected by all of my contact list. No one want to answer my calling.
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  • Isn't cold calling illegal?

    Isn't it mostly WASTE OF TIME?

    If I ever get a cold call i always think "yeah your service/product is sooo great you have to revert to cold calling to get customers..." Not a great start.

    Does it work? Course it does.....Should you do it?
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    • Profile picture of the author palmtreelife
      Isn't cold calling illegal?
      What law is being broken by calling someone or a business?

      Isn't it mostly WASTE OF TIME?
      It's definitely a waste of time for those who don't know how to do it effectively. There are many in here who are good at it though. The same can be said for most online methods of making money...a LOT of people don't make any money or even lose money online. Some would say that's also a waste of time...but ask the right people and I don't think they'd agree.

      If I ever get a cold call i always think "yeah your service/product is sooo great you have to revert to cold calling to get customers..." Not a great start.
      Maybe you've never been offered a product or service that you actually wanted or needed? I don't think you'd feel that way if it was something unique or the person selling was nice and not aggressive, and you actually wanted or needed it.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by offmarketinvestor View Post

      Isn't cold calling illegal?
      No.



      Originally Posted by offmarketinvestor View Post

      Isn't it mostly WASTE OF TIME?
      Yes, just like all prospecting/marketing. Most direct mail is thrown away unread. Most phone calls don't get through, most e-mails are ignored.



      Originally Posted by offmarketinvestor View Post

      If I ever get a cold call i always think "yeah your service/product is sooo great you have to revert to cold calling to get customers..." Not a great start.
      Almost nobody thinks that. You may think that, but customers don't.


      Originally Posted by offmarketinvestor View Post

      Does it work? Course it does.....Should you do it?
      Should?
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      • Profile picture of the author myob
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post


        Should?
        "92% of all customer interactions happen over the phone."
        - Salesforce.com

        In my experience, the phone still is one of the most powerful systems ever for initiating and closing sales. Although advertising, the internet and automated gizmos are great for mass publicity and lead generation, it always comes down to personal communication. Unless you can connect with people on a personal level, you may find yourself among the pitiful and wretched who whine and complain about not getting sales.

        "The beast makes the cold call while the excuse makers scream and cry."
        - Grant Cardone, "10X Your Business, 10X Your Income, 10X Your Life"
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  • Profile picture of the author myob
    I think the biggest mistakes amateurs make in cold calling is they try to be coy and attempt a sale on the first call.

    Always be upfront and open the call with your full name and company name.

    Avoid asking time-wasting questions (how are you, is this a good time, blah blah blah)

    You've got less than 20 seconds to present your offer, so make a big and bold claim about your product or service.

    Close for an appointment, demonstration, or followup call - never try to directly sell on the first call.

    If there is no answer, always leave an engaging voice mail message, with full contact information, including website.

    Be prepared to be googled. They will check you out.

    In my not so humble opinion, cold calling is perhaps among the top strategies for quick traction and lasting presence especially in the most competitive (ie lucrative) markets.
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  • Profile picture of the author jduck1979
    It may still work a bit, but people are so pissed off with people doing it you're probably better off with leafleting / posters / online ads instead.

    In the UK, this thing has been introduced to crack down on it: https://www.tpsonline.org.uk//tps/index.html
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  • Profile picture of the author Yvon Boulianne
    by personal experience it work like a charm but you have to know your stuff, know your sales tech and speak native language help a lot too... but but but i prefer cold email, very simple text with a call to action like "let me know when is the best part for a short call this week"..

    that got me more clients than i need for my web design and marketing business
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  • Profile picture of the author Monica8297
    Cold calling used to work 10 years back but not these days however, the niche you are pitching to and your services might make an impact.
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  • Cold calling services is an old method of a marketing strategy but it still has some relevance in today's world as it has many advantages.
    1. Freedom of hunting alone
    2. All-time marketing, more opportunity
    3. Go hassle-free and economical
    4. Little to no support structure
    5. The quickest way of making things possible and feasible
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  • Profile picture of the author qtechservers
    I don't think any decision makers would buy from a cold call or give an appointment. We also found this an expensive solution. The calling, the staff payments, etc. Email marketing and Social Selling, Paid Ads is a lot more effective.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by qtechservers View Post

      I don't think any decision makers would buy from a cold call or give an appointment.
      And you say this after several of us tell about our cold calling experience...and talk about the companies that are using cold calls? Did you get a cold call in the last week? If you're in business, you have. And these calls make money for the person calling.
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      • Profile picture of the author animal44
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        And you say this after several of us tell about our cold calling experience...
        Well, he's relating his experience... and the experience of most people who try cold calling... as evidenced by the OP and many others who post on here...

        And that's before we even start to talk about the huge increase in telephone scams...

        Cold calling isn't dead, but it ought to be...
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      Originally Posted by qtechservers View Post

      I don't think any decision makers would buy from a cold call or give an appointment.
      Many, if not most of the top decision makers can only be approached effectively through cold call prospecting. Over 90% of the business executives I've sold to were initially contacted by phone, and almost always appointments and/or sales are ultimately made exclusively over the phone. There are lots of marketing tools available, but hardly anything can replace the effectiveness of old-fashion personal communication, such as the phone. Only face-to-face selling is more effective - particularly for high-end products/services.

      Originally Posted by qtechservers View Post

      We also found this an expensive solution. The calling, the staff payments, etc. Email marketing and Social Selling, Paid Ads is a lot more effective.
      Train your staff well in proven selling methods, and pay your sales team commission only. I found the phone to be the least expensive and most effective tool for selling - when done right. Email marketing, Social Selling, Paid Ads, and other online exposure tools, etc are merely adjuncts in the total sales process. Technology may change, but human behavior remains the same.

      Cold calling is quite alive and well. More people have phones than ever before, and usually now have them instantly available. Cold calling, done right, is actually the quickest and most effective method for generating sales. Having a strong online presence is required these days, but so-called "old school" sales, focused on personal communication and building relationships, has never changed.
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    This entire debate over cold calling seems to be between two different arguments.

    1) We do cold calling successfully.

    2) We don't like cold calling, we think there are better ways to get customers, we dislike getting cold calls, and we think cold callers are evil and misguided.

    And the #2 people are arguing a different argument, as though they are arguing with #1.

    Personally, I'll never do another cold call...ever. And I don't enjoy getting them. Just like I don't enjoy any conversation initiated in any way. Not by e-mail, direct mail, telephone, or FAX.

    But the truth is, in any sales exchange...somebody had to start the conversation. And that is usually something similar to a cold call.

    It's intellectually painful when I read here something along the lines "I don't like cold calls, so they don't work for anybody". It's simply not a rational stance to take.

    We have had this conversation several times on this forum. More evidence that learning rarely takes place.
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  • Profile picture of the author myob
    For the record, cold calling is NOT DEAD. Far from it.
    It's easier to claim it doesn't work than figure out how to do it right.

    You need to be able to quickly answer the two most common (unspoken) objections within about 20 seconds ...
    Who are you?
    Why are you calling?

    Include something like these in your opening salvo:
    "I understand the challenges you face, and I believe I can help."
    "I have solved the problems you face for others, and I believe I can do it for you."

    Especially in the more competitive markets, prospects are not going to try to find you. In my experience, cold calling is the most effective way to rise above the competition of marketing heavy weights and the search engines. And in some of the most lucrative markets, your only competition is often just other cold callers.

    For example, I sell high end Amazon products to executives and business owners within very narrow vertical markets. They appreciate this "service" because it saves them a lot of time. Hardly anyone is doing this (because they hate it), so the real competition is nearly negligible. Cold calling, in my not so humble opinion, is not only the least expensive but also the most effective method to quickly find top decision makers.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by myob View Post

      It's easier to claim it doesn't work than figure out how to do it right.
      Yup. Just like any type of marketing, prospecting, or selling....

      Someone tries something once or twice, and it doesn't work.

      This morphs into "It doesn't work"...and that morphs into...

      "It doesn't work in my business"...which eventually becomes...

      "This doesn't work for anybody in any business". And we have a new Gospel. And no amount of evidence will change their mind.

      When I started selling Kirby vacuum cleaners in 1976 (I bought one already) it took me three months before I made a sale.

      My wife (at the time) kept telling me "Nobody is going to buy this"....and I would say "Yes they will. I bought one, others are making sales. I just need to figure out what I am doing wrong".

      And I did.


      I was talking to a store owner in Canton Ohio. I asked him what kind of advertising he did. He said "Advertising doesn't work in Canton Ohio". And he was serious.

      I asked how he knew. He said "I ran a newspaper ad once, and it didn't work".

      So he now made the leap that all advertising will fail for everyone in his city....and that was now his Gospel. And that's what we have on these threads on Cold Calling.
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    • Profile picture of the author animal44
      Originally Posted by myob View Post

      Cold calling, in my not so humble opinion, is not only the least expensive but also the most effective method to quickly find top decision makers.
      Yep, real effective for the OP...

      "Cold calling is God's punishment for failure to get enough referrals."
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by animal44 View Post

        Yep, real effective for the OP...

        "Cold calling is God's punishment for failure to get enough referrals."
        That's actually what I used to tell my reps.

        "Cold calling is punishment for not getting enough referrals".

        In our business of personal consumer sales, getting and calling referrals was far more profitable per hour, than cold calling. Although when I just knocked on doors, an hour usually produced at least one immediate presentation. But not all businesses are the same.

        In some businesses, cold calling is almost as profitable as referral selling. And I imagine in some businesses cold calling is almost a waste of time.

        And in nearly all businesses, cold calling is more profitable than sitting on your ass, waiting for an incoming call.

        And like I've mentioned before, most people say "Cold calling" when they really mean calling either past customers or buyer lists. To me those are very good leads to call. To me, they are so likely to buy that it doesn't matter that they weren't expecting your call.

        But compiled lists of names with no commonality except that they have a phone?
        I've made it work, but that's hard labor. Almost like panning for gold in a swimming pool.
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  • Profile picture of the author pramodtapu
    Yes,it certainly effective .It will always work as long as you have the power to initiate a conversation and convince.Cold calling strategy is really important if you want good results.but it takes putting in some extra work to get the results you are looking for.
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  • Profile picture of the author alordincans1
    It is effective, but way less than the past.

    Studies have shown that millennials hate to get cold called.

    Yet, sometimes I still keep listening when someone cold call me to pitch their services, and I've seen on YouTube many people being successful with it.

    Look at your own skills. Do you have any past experience with inbound or outbound sales calls? If not, I think it wouldn't be efficient for you to start doing them, as cold emails and other kind of lead generation strategies are way more effective cost-result wise.
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    I would be interested to see a study (or survey) that shows that cold calling on the phone is less effective today that it was..say...10 years ago.

    Anyone have a link?
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    • Profile picture of the author animal44
      How about:
      https://www.inc.com/geoffrey-james/i...ad-buried.html

      Cold calling isn't just dead; it's buried and rotted to the bones.


      A number of my clients have shut down their telemarketing. I'll see if I can get permission to post some stats and their reasons for shutting down.
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by animal44 View Post

        How about:
        https://www.inc.com/geoffrey-james/i...ad-buried.html





        A number of my clients have shut down their telemarketing. I'll see if I can get permission to post some stats and their reasons for shutting down.
        After I made my last post, I did a few Google searches for real stats on the effectiveness of cold calls over the phone. Other than several "less people are doing it now" statements, I found nothing. Even stats from a single company over time would be useful information

        There are lots of reasons a single company may stop cold calling. The reason they stopped FAXing cold was because it became illegal.

        It would seem to me (a very unscientific way to start a sentence) that a company would stop cold calling on the phone when they found a better way, or cold calling became unprofitable.

        Right next to my retail store was a 50 booth cold calling center. They closed down after about 3 years. I asked the manager what the problem was, and he told me that it was just too hard to fill the booths and get them to stay long enough to get decent at it.

        That type of job (they paid minimum wage) is more in demand when the economy is terrible, and there is a high jobless rate. Maybe that has something to do with it now.


        I still think many of us here are confusing what cold calling is. We may be arguing about different things entirely.

        To me, cold calling is phoning complete strangers randomly. Maybe out of a directory, or with a compiled list.

        But I keep hearing these things called "Cold Calling";

        1) Calling lists of your own customers.
        2) Calling people who have requested information from you.
        3) Calling customers of a company that you have bought.
        4) Calling people who are used to buying what you sell. For example, I used to call event planners for marketing events and trade shows, offering my speeches and seminars. Nobody ever hung up on me, and about a third of the calls resulted in at least a real request for more information. Almost nobody was ever rude, because Speakers regularly called these people...and they did business. So, although technically it was a cold call, had I just randomly called lists of names of consumers...I would have starved before I made my first sale.

        5) Lists of people who have bought from your company in the past , but stopped.
        For example, businesses that used to be a member of the Chamber Of Commerce but stopped.

        If you are calling lists of people who have donated to a charity or political party like yours in the past, that's a cold call. But it's a highly selective call to a very likely buyers.

        I wouldn't even call these cold calls. But I know many would.

        And.......it's hard to argue with business owners that are currently using cold calls to make real money for their company.
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        • Profile picture of the author animal44
          Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

          To me, cold calling is phoning complete strangers randomly. Maybe out of a directory, or with a compiled list.
          Fits my definition. Phoning someone who has never had any previous contact with you...
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          • Profile picture of the author myob
            Originally Posted by animal44 View Post

            Fits my definition. Phoning someone who has never had any previous contact with you...
            ^^ Exactly. But so what?

            If you've got what they're looking for, and they have your money, make that call.
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            • Profile picture of the author Daniel Evans
              Originally Posted by myob View Post

              ^^ Exactly. But so what?
              'Fear of being a pain in the backside'.

              Well founded if the target market is too loose in the scope.

              You'll pop one in the cheek of someone wrong and many more.

              The fundamental point then is to not hesitate to put effort into market research before pulling the trigger.
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            • Profile picture of the author animal44
              Originally Posted by myob View Post

              If you've got what they're looking for, and they have your money, make that call.
              1. I'm not desperate, like you guys...
              2. I don't want to be as poor as you cold callers...
              3, I have too much respect for my prospects.
              4. I have a new McClaren to pay for...




              Found a study from 2011. Baylor University's Keller Center for Research did and experiment to "quantify the importance and effectiveness of cold calling as a prospecting tool".

              They found it took 330 calls to get an appointment. 7.5 hours of calling, just to get an appointment. Not a sale, just an appointment.

              Here's a link to the PDF.

              In that time, taken from a recent campaign, I could make 2281 sales, all the while spending a pleasant day out with the wife.

              In four days I made 9124 sales. No cold calling involved. Indeed, I can't recall what I actually did in the four days, but I assure you I wasn't attached to my phone or stuck in my office all day...

              The commissions on that campaign would pay for several McClarens

              And a cold caller wouldn't be able to come close to just calling 9124 people in four days, little own sell them something.

              Is cold calling effective? Not on your nelly buster...

              Oh, and another example. 18 year old girl with no sales and marketing expedience makes approx 160 stone cold sales in 30 days. Average sale approx $100. No need for her to cold call either...
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              • Profile picture of the author Daniel Evans
                Originally Posted by animal44 View Post

                1. I'm not desperate, like you guys...

                Oh, and another example. 18 year old girl with no sales and marketing expedience makes approx 160 stone cold sales in 30 days. Average sale approx $100. No need for her to cold call either...
                We can only trust that you aren't flaunting, via inbound calls, women of the nocturne...
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                • Profile picture of the author animal44
                  Originally Posted by Daniel Evans View Post

                  We can only trust that you aren't flaunting, via inbound calls, women of the nocturne...
                  I'm shocked at the minds of some people...

                  She's too nice for such a thing. Plus her grandma would, at the very least, castrate me...
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                  • Profile picture of the author Daniel Evans
                    Originally Posted by animal44 View Post

                    I'm shocked at the minds of some people...
                    It's now set on wondering what Claude would look like in that car....
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              • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
                Originally Posted by animal44 View Post

                1. I'm not desperate, like you guys...
                2. I don't want to be as poor as you cold callers...
                3, I have too much respect for my prospects.
                4. I have a new McClaren to pay for...




                Found a study from 2011. Baylor University's Keller Center for Research did and experiment to "quantify the importance and effectiveness of cold calling as a prospecting tool".

                They found it took 330 calls to get an appointment. 7.5 hours of calling, just to get an appointment. Not a sale, just an appointment.

                In that time, taken from a recent campaign, I could make 2281 sales, all the while spending a pleasant day out with the wife.

                In four days I made 9124 sales. No cold calling involved. Indeed, I can't recall what I actually did in the four days, but I assure you I wasn't attached to my phone or stuck in my office all day...

                The commissions on that campaign would pay for several McClarens

                And a cold caller wouldn't be able to come close to just calling 9124 people in four days, little own sell them something.

                Is cold calling effective? Not on your nelly buster...

                Oh, and another example. 18 year old girl with no sales and marketing expedience makes approx 160 stone cold sales in 30 days. Average sale approx $100. No need for her to cold call either...
                I believe your study is real. (Meaning I don't think you made it up) But I've never heard, from any salesperson I've ever known, such terrible numbers. So, although it may be real life, it's an anomaly. The numbers indicate no interest in actually making an appointment. This was not done by a company that wants to make an appointment.


                In the industry I was in, the average was one appointment in 6 cold calls to complete strangers. My personal average was one in 3. That was my average whether I knocked on a door or made a call. When I called business owners, I think my average, to get an appointment, was one in three. And then there was a 30% chance that I'd actually give them a presentation. So it was about 1 presentation per 9 calls (where contact was made). And I stopped just 3 years ago. So it isn't ancient history.

                But I'm exceptional. Cold calling is heavily dependent on tone of voice, personality, and quick thinking. A great script will help quite a lot.

                And I have to agree with you.....

                Creating joint ventures with companies , if done intelligently, will make almost anyone more money than a single person making cold calls, one on one. If you wrote a book on joint ventures, I'd buy it. Maybe even attend a high end training on the subject. If you started a thread about joint ventures, I'd be very interested in reading it, as would many of us.

                But I think your "You guys are stupid because you aren't in the business I am in" posts are a little counter productive.
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                • Profile picture of the author animal44
                  Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

                  But I think your "You guys are stupid because you aren't in the business I am in" posts are a little counter productive.
                  I'd love to see the post where you've taken this interpretation...

                  I think it's stupid to reply to someone who is struggling with "you're not doing it right" or "it works for me".

                  OP hasn't been back in a while, so rather pointless offering further advice of any sort.

                  Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

                  I believe your study is real. (Meaning I don't think you made it up) But I've never heard, from any salesperson I've ever known, such terrible numbers. So, although it may be real life, it's an anomaly. The numbers indicate no interest in actually making an appointment. This was not done by a company that wants to make an appointment.
                  I've added this link to my post. It's a PDF download.
                  Don't know the reputation of Baylor Uni, though I'd be suspicious of anything out of Waco, Texas...
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        • Profile picture of the author myob
          What I teach my sales people is that sales is a process, not an event. And cold calling is nothing more than determining if there is a need for our products or services. But, they are euphemistically called "technical consultants", not sales people.

          Selling is giving people the opportunity to buy something that they didn't know they needed, wanted, or even had in their budget.

          I prefer cold calling because it has proven to be the fastest method for generating sales, especially in arenas where the competition is dominated by heavy hitters. The competition does the heavy lifting in their expensive ad campaigns and mass publicity. I just capitalize (with much appreciation) on their efforts.

          Cold calling almost always bypasses the competition because most of them really don't know how to effectively sell directly. The secret sauce is to project and have an authoritative presence such as widely distributed content and a strong social media following. Online/offline credibility and social proof are powerful tools when cold calling.

          Certainly, some sales can and are being made without cold calling. Most people, however, seem to focus on spending way too much time on providing prospects with warm fuzzies and freebies, become their "friends", get "subscribers", become "liked", "engage" audiences, and other time-wasting gimmicks.

          In my experience, cold calling is a shortcut to finding and qualifying prospects. The "relationship" building occurs after the sale is made, not before. The ill-advised notion that people only buy from those whom they know, like and trust is complete nonsense and a waste of time. Quite often I notice we take sales away from the competition while they are just "warming up" their prospects.
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          • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
            Originally Posted by myob View Post

            In my experience, cold calling is a shortcut to finding and qualifying prospects. The "relationship" building occurs after the sale is made, not before. .
            My thought exactly. The relationship begins after they bought from me. That way, I'm concentrating on people that are highly likely to buy from me again.

            It's very difficult for newbies to see this.

            In my sales business, when selling in home, when I hired a new group of reps, there were three myths that they had to lose. Incredible time wasters;

            1) The "Imaginary huge commercial sale delusion". ..A new rep would (usually on their first day) tell me about this guy they know who owns a business...or works for the Army...who will buy a thousand of our vacuum cleaners at one time. And they may waste months, trying to get this sale moving. I've never seen one of these fantasy volume sales actually happen.

            2) They would believe people that said "I'll buy later". The rep would think he had 5 sales a week "in the bag" because these people were certainly going to buy next week..or next Tuesday. In my entire life, 12,000 personal sales presentations...thousands of presentations by reps that worked for me...it's never happened. And no matter what I say, the new guy can't be convinced. It has to be experienced to be believed.

            3) They believe that if the husband isn't home, the wife will buy without him there. The wife will swear "No, I make all my own decisions. If I want it, I can buy it on my own". Of course, they are saying that because they don't yet want it. And they aren't close to buying.
            No matter what is promised, at the end, the wife says "Well, of course I'll have to talk it over with my husband". Of course.

            Have I ever sold a wife or husband without the spouse? Yes. Maybe three times. I used to keep records, and found that I'd sell a "wife only" about 2% of the time. So I just stopped,and stopped letting my reps do it too. Sales increased.

            Added later; I should repeat that this was in home sales. Retail is different, online is different.
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        • Profile picture of the author myob
          Advertising Secrets I Learned From The Kirby Vacuum Cleaner Man

          This 100+ year old company has a marketing model that is centered around direct marketing including cold calling. Yet they also have an impressive online presence in the major social media platforms, extensive online knowledge base, and a technology-centric global infrastructure.

          This example shows that cold calling still is an effective and extremely powerful tool. Especially in this competitive market, you don't get many sales by sitting behind a computer trying to get backlinks, "subscribers", "friends", "likes", or "views".
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          • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
            I read the article...How could I not?

            Kirby still trains its people the same way as they did 50 years ago.

            The salesman in this example made two huge mistakes.

            1) He let the woman go back to work on her computer as he demonstrated. It's impossible to keep the person focused on what you are doing, unless they are undistracted. It's the one newbie mistake that will almost guarantee they won't buy.

            2) He did the "I'll shampoo a room of carpet for free' offer. i did that for a few months, and my closing percentage plummeted to about 15%. It gives the prospect permission to do anything else they want, while the desire to buy slowly evaporates from the room.

            On the plus side, the guy asked intelligent questions, and showed a need for what he sold. It's true that a physical product demonstration can do half the selling for you.

            I would have asked all the qualifying questions before I went to the car for the vacuum.

            Kirby trains their people to show their product to anyone that will let you in the door. Sure, they close sales. But they do a lot of presentations between sales.

            When I was knocking on doors, I just wanted to talk to that one nice guy that was likely to buy from me. So about half of the people that let me in the door, I'd ask a few questions...and politely leave, looking for that better qualified prospect.
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      • Profile picture of the author myob
        Is cold calling really worth it? I don't pay attention to "studies", except for my own.

        For me, cold calling is extremely powerful. My sales people average 2% conversions from dead cold leads.

        It takes an average of 8 calls to get a prospect on the phone, then 3-7 calls to close the deal.

        Some of my best customers were either the direct or indirect result of cold calling.

        We get 1-4 referrals from every sale, and often even from rejections.

        An unexpected side benefit is a surge of traffic as prospects check us out. (Adding to Google love and ranking)

        In my experience, cold calling is very often the only tactic for quickly finding and qualifying otherwise elusive prospects.

        But, that's just me.
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by myob View Post

          Is cold calling really worth it? I don't pay attention to "studies", except for my own.

          For me, cold calling is extremely powerful. My sales people average 2% conversions from dead cold leads.

          It takes an average of 8 calls to get a prospect on the phone, then 3-7 calls to close the deal.

          Some of my best customers were either the direct or indirect result of cold calling.

          We get 1-4 referrals from every sale, and often even from rejections.

          An unexpected side benefit is a surge of traffic as prospects check us out. (Adding to Google love and ranking)

          In my experience, cold calling is very often the only tactic for quickly finding and qualifying otherwise elusive prospects.

          But, that's just me.

          Your business set up, scripts, hiring practices, and supplier lists ...sound like a phenomenal information product in the making. As does Animal 44's.

          When I first started getting referrals, meaning I put together a solid referral prospecting system, my first step was to go back to customers I had originally cold called, to show the referral process. I can't count the number of pre-sold referrals I got this way.


          Added later; The original question was about cold calling effectiveness. The answer is...Yes, it's as efective as it has always been. The changes in technology make it harder to get people with Caller ID to pick up the phone...but we have access to better lists and faster dialers. So it may (depending on industry) be a wash.

          Is it as effective as calling referrals that were recommended by customers? No.?

          Is a cold name better than a name of someone who requested information? Not even close.

          Would I personally rather talk to inbound leads? Absolutely.

          But does cold calling still produce results for a student of selling? Yes.
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        • Profile picture of the author eccj
          Originally Posted by myob View Post


          An unexpected side benefit is a surge of traffic as prospects check us out. (Adding to Google love and ranking)

          In my experience, cold calling is very often the only tactic for quickly finding and qualifying otherwise elusive prospects.

          But, that's just me.
          I've never thought about the web part of calling before. How do you capitalize on that?

          I completely agree on your second point. At this point in my career I decide on who I want to do business with and go get them. Some of these people are so hard to find the only reasonable way to get a hold of them or even find out who the right person to talk to is getting on the phone and making it happen.

          I'm all for getting sales the easy way and in my situation the easy way is picking someone out that I want to do business with and presenting my idea to make lots of sales for us both. These are not so much "sales calls" as they are "start a conversation" calls but most of the same principles applies.
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          • Profile picture of the author myob
            Originally Posted by eccj View Post

            I've never thought about the web part of calling before. How do you capitalize on that?
            With every cold call (including "not interested", voicemail, etc) I will inject one of my niche-relevant websites, or an invitation to do a google search with a suggested search term which I know will rank in the top for my articles, blogs, forum posts, social media, ebooks, webinars, etc.

            People are curious, and they almost always do a search even if they say "not interested". And they will do a search on you (often extensively) before placing a big order. I quite frequently do get multiple inquiries and sometimes even sales from initial cold call rejections and hang ups as a result of this "leveraged curiosity".

            Cold calling is not my primary marketing strategy. (My forte is article syndication and content marketing) But all my sales reps are expected to do at least five hours per week cold calling on selected prominent leading industries, professionals, and influencers.

            Generally, there is no other way (that is, of which I am aware) for quickly finding, qualifying and closing otherwise elusive prospects in the most hotly competitive markets which are mostly dominated by deep-pocketed marketing professionals.

            Cold calling is like prospecting for gold. Not much comes your way by "attracting" it, getting "liked", or just because Google loves you.
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            • Profile picture of the author animal44
              Originally Posted by myob View Post

              Cold calling is like prospecting for gold.
              I can go with that analogy. Most prospectors ended up broke...
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              • Profile picture of the author myob
                Originally Posted by myob View Post

                Cold calling is like prospecting for gold. Not much comes your way by "attracting" it, getting "liked", or just because Google loves you.


                Originally Posted by animal44 View Post

                I can go with that analogy. Most prospectors ended up broke...
                True. Most of them were perhaps starry-eyed, irrational foolhardy hopefuls, and thousands even died. Nearly all were unprepared and most did not even come with the right tools or equipment.

                Fortunes and great wealth was produced not only by the few well-equiped prospectors, but also by niche marketing prospectors who called on these highly "pre-qualified" prospects to sell food, equipment, tools, supplies, etc.

                Cold calling is really not much different today from the gold prospecting days of yore. You need the right equipment, tools, and preparation. Those who don't know how to prospect end up buying from those that do.

                For example, books, courses, tools, equipment, etc produced for the IM industry are targeted towards marketers who don't want to sell. The "Gold Rush" of cold calling prospects and prospecting to the prospectors has been running for decades.

                "Samson killed a thousand men with the jaw bone of an ass. The same number of sales are killed every day with the same weapon."

                - Arthur L. Williams (Primerica), "On Cold Calling: Go for the Gold"
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                • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
                  Originally Posted by myob View Post

                  For example, books, courses, tools, equipment, etc produced for the IM industry are targeted towards marketers who don't want to sell.
                  It's the same in marketing conferences. Every speaker is selling a Marketing System whose main claim is "No more cold calling" or "No more selling".

                  And yet, how is the "system" being sold? The guy is up there on stage, sweating...selling.

                  And how did he get the gig? Probably by calling event promoters and pitching himself.

                  Of maybe 200 speaking gigs I've done where I was being paid, I think only five were referrals, the rest were made by me cold calling trade show event planners, or cold contacting company presidents about their next annual meeting. Cold Calling. Maybe intelligently done...but cold calling.

                  A few were from people calling me because they saw one of my videos online, or read a book of mine, or saw me speak. But if you want to stay busy? you make the calls.

                  And in every business transaction where money changed hands...somebody had to start the conversation. But whatever you do...don't call it cold calling. Because as we have seen here...that never works.

                  Added later; I was talking to Dan Kennedy at one of his conferences, while a guru was on stage selling a Social Media Marketing course. And I said "Isn't it strange that nobody notices that the person that is saying that selling on social media is the only way to get business...is not using social media to sell her course? She's up there pitching with all the rest of us."

                  Kennedy laughed and said that he thought about that, with guys selling online marketing as how to make sales...while the guru is selling their own materials on stage...and they used direct mail and phone calls to sell seats to the event..
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                  • Profile picture of the author myob
                    Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

                    But whatever you do...don't call it cold calling. Because as we have seen here...that never works.
                    Use euphemisms if that helps ... canvassing, appointment-making, lead research, pipeline building, prospect outreach ...

                    A rose by any other name is still a rose.
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                    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
                      Originally Posted by myob View Post

                      Use euphemisms if that helps ... canvassing, appointment-making, lead research, pipeline building, prospect outreach ...

                      A rose by any other name is still a rose.
                      Because it's obviously illegal to use the word "Selling" or "Prospecting" when teaching people how to sell...

                      In MLM they insist on calling it Sharing. In retail, it's called Suggesting.

                      When I hired reps to sell vacuum cleaners for a different distributor, I had to call it Recommending. You were making a recommendation.

                      And cold calling was called lead selection.

                      One vacuum cleaner company insisted on making it sound like you were an actor. They called an appointment a Gig....and a presentation a Show. And the appointment setter (cold caller) was "Booking a show". And the cold caller was called a Director Of Marketing. I'm not kidding.

                      Because no matter what we were doing...it wasn't selling. Nope.

                      Essentially, you are trying to teach non-salespeople (which is better than 99% of us) how to sell.

                      Thank God, I'll never have to do that again.
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      • Profile picture of the author Daniel Evans
        Back in 2001, I cold called for the first time in accordance with a mandatory business plan.

        Nervous at the idea, expecting to be given grief from some of the people I called, everyone one of those 700 people were pleasant.

        In hindsight, this was obviously due to the fact I was phoning businesses.

        If on the other hand, I had of called residential addresses, it would have perhaps changed the dynamic substantially, since that's when you're entering in on privacy. That for me, and others is the obvious clincher.

        I've had to take measures regardless and purchase a telephone for my home with the 'Call Guardian' feature as mentioned above. This is chiefly due to the fact that my telephone home number is one of the most simple series of numbers you can imagine. It would be absolutely ideal to market the number in the interest of business.

        Unfortunately however, other people assume the number is related to an array of different businesses (or people), so I get at least 6 calls a day (blocked), which I assume from past experience, relate to people who assume I'm a doctors surgery, garage, Peter, Andy....and Alison.

        Cold calls, now, due to my Fort Knox of a telephone line, just happen to be blocked together with all of those...
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        • Profile picture of the author animal44
          Originally Posted by Daniel Evans View Post

          Nervous at the idea, expecting to be given grief from some of the people I called, everyone one of those 700 people were pleasant.
          Usually the worst that will happen is they hang up on you.

          However, if you call a plumber trying to sell them SEO when they're up to they're armpits in sewage, you might not get the best response...!
          Originally Posted by Daniel Evans View Post

          Cold calls, now, due to my Fort Knox of a telephone line, just happen to be blocked together with all of those...
          There is a business DNC list in UK (and, I believe, Texas and one of the eastern states, Vermont?), however, in the UK you were required to re-register very year. Don't know if that's changed, but a stupid requirement in my opinion.
          I've got call blocking software and now I rarely get cold calls - or rather I never notice them...

          With all the telephone scams today, I'm surprised that otherwise sensible business owners would buy anything from a cold caller...
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          • Profile picture of the author Daniel Evans
            Originally Posted by animal44 View Post

            With all the telephone scams today, I'm surprised that otherwise sensible business owners would buy anything from a cold caller...
            Targeting locally, especially with an accent, perhaps yields a bit of trust and with a few words, detailing the topic too, the company will align themselves with the caller and realize they have called and targeted the business because it has similar interests.

            Residential cold calling, with some exceptions granted, might be considered a a shot in a dark, scraping for a sale by whatever means.

            I suppose in the first B2B case, the business is already 'warmed' and is essentially nudging a the neighbour, in a circle of similar interests.
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      • Profile picture of the author animal44
        Found an answer to the cold callers....


        Says a lot about cold calling when a company like this can thrive...
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      I would be interested to see a study (or survey) that shows that cold calling on the phone is less effective today that it was..say...10 years ago.

      Anyone have a link?
      [Grant Cardone holds his phone up in the air above his head during one of his webinars] "This is not a phone, it is a weapon. ... Keep in mind, every call results in a sale. You either make the sale, or you are sold. Sell ... or be sold." Amateurs are sold on the belief that cold calling doesn't work.

      I've been doing cold calling for over 20 years, and there is no letup in sight. Of course, it's not a major direct source of revenue, but we have consistently tapped into extremely lucrative markets which the competition has overwhelming precluded through virtually any other commercially viable method. Cold calling levels the playing field when you're up against stiff competition.

      Marketing heavyweights have dominated most of the "easy" channels - content marketing, attraction marketing, social media, search engines, PPC, emails, and even some of the primary offline strategies such as advertising, publishing and multimedia.

      For some, cold calling is dead as a doornail and has never been effective. For others, it is booming as the most effective and powerful method for preempting the competition.

      Just sayin'
      https://hockeystickprinciples.com/co...im-just-sayin/
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by myob View Post

        Marketing heavyweights have dominated most of the "easy" channels - content marketing, attraction marketing, social media, search engines, PPC, emails, and even some of the primary offline strategies such as advertising, publishing and multimedia.
        Yup. The difference between marketing and selling.

        Marketers use every means to get a customer besides just calling them up and selling them.

        Salespeople just make the calls.

        Although I have to say that I made my biggest jump in sales when I studied marketing for a few years. How to find Highly Likely Buyers....is really more about marketing.

        And...while not exactly cold calling, the fastest way to make sales (for me at least) is to just phone up past customers. To me, not cold calling, but I know others think of it that way.

        Grant Cardone has his reps get him training gigs by just cold calling car dealers. Cardone has name recognition in the industry, but it's real cold calling.

        And Bill Glazer (Of Glazer Kennedy) told me, at one of their $1,500 per person 3 day marketing events...with about !,200 people in attendance....that they used 22 direct mail pieces to fill the room. And the 23rd contact was a phone call by a teleshark. He said half the room was sold in that one call. These calls were to people that had bought something in the past, but still almost cold. I still get calls, and I haven't bought anything from Kennedy in years.

        We still get daily calls from utilities resellers, credit card processors, and insurance people. It must still work, or they would stop.

        added later; Some life insurance agents just sell over the phone from actual cold calls. They use a phone room calling lists of people who have just turned 65 (or a similar commonality). I know an agency that averages a few sales a day per agent. That works out to over $1,000 a day commission for the tele-agent.

        He told me that the hardest part is the beginning of the call. It's all about rapport, and building trust. He said that the average presentation takes about 2 hours..in one call. It may not be for me, but others make it work well.
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        • Profile picture of the author myob
          Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

          The difference between marketing and selling.

          Marketers use every means to get a customer besides just calling them up and selling them.

          Salespeople just make the calls.
          That's why most salespeople suck. They don't understand that both marketing and selling. are essential.

          It's a business where people nowadays have resources to checkout and search everything. If you don't have a strong online and/or offline presence, you're most likely to be regarded as just another annoying little pest.

          Cold calling still works like gangbusters, but certainly not like it was before the internet, social media, and mass online/offline search resources.

          [Squash, hangup]
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          • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
            Originally Posted by myob View Post

            That's why most salespeople suck. They don't understand that both marketing and selling. are essential.

            It's a business where people nowadays have resources to checkout and search everything. If you don't have a strong online and/or offline presence, you're most likely to be regarded as just another annoying little pest.

            Cold calling still works like gangbusters, but certainly not like it was before the internet, social media, and mass online/offline search resources.

            [Squash, hangup]
            I know.

            One reason there are almost no door to door vacuum cleaner salespeople today is that as soon as the person buys, they go online to get a better price. And they always find one. You can also go online and usually find horror stories about the company (no matter what company it is).

            It's why every salesperson should have a strong online presence.

            I tell salespeople that there are three times that prospects will go online;
            1) After you call, but before they buy.
            2) While you are on the phone (or while you are in front of them)
            3) As soon as they bought, or as soon as they decided not to buy from you.

            Most life insurance phone sales are made to retired people because the chances of them going online to get price comparisons is less than selling a younger person.

            When I started selling my local online marketing service, I had three websites, a blog, and hundreds of articles and videos produced...because I knew that these online searches would be done. And I needed my content to be the first thing they see...and the second, third, and fourth. Same with my retail sales. Lots of online content telling the customer how wonderful we are.
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  • Profile picture of the author frantasticindia
    Cold calling can be both effective and useless but it is not an easy task. Its result depends on people who use this marketing channel. Cold calling can be very effective, but it takes putting in some extra work to get the returns you're looking for.
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  • Profile picture of the author Arv Saraf
    i think cold calling is effective but it is not essay to convert it because the conversion rate is approx 6.3-6.5% approximately.
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  • Profile picture of the author Pratikitpro
    If people are not taking your call then may be the list you have, is not that much verified.

    Make sure the List should be well Targeted, Authenticated & Verified. If possible do your primary research yourself.

    If people say, they are not interest, then be relexed and say, OK and ask then, any reason for not buying...

    If they keep ignoring then avoid or if they are answering. Means there is a chance.

    Not down all your conversation, no matter it is closed or not, at least till then you get results.

    It helps.

    And yes, Cold Calling is something that can't be down. It will be there... Format & medium may change but not the concept.
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  • Profile picture of the author rkahn
    Cold-calling still exists. Call centers in India and Pakistan will vouch for that. In terms of effectiveness, I'd say that it's usefulness may have been reduced over the past year or 2 in the wake of more sophisticated digital marketing solutions, but businesses do incorporate cold-calling as part of their strategy, and it is still effective.
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    • Profile picture of the author Daniel Evans
      Originally Posted by rkahn View Post

      Cold-calling still exists. Call centers in India and Pakistan will vouch for that.
      In the form of many calls no less.

      The irony is, because of these operations, in this day and age, simple technology such 'Call Guardian' is being rolled out by means of equipment manufacturers and service providers.
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  • Profile picture of the author sailingdom
    Cold calling was always a mugs game. I made a lot of money from those mugs. My point is that cold calling is hard, there are now easier ways of discovering how hard it is to sell anything. So, you say, what do I do? Well, thanks for asking! What you do is work harder than your competition, be better than your competition and give better service than your competition. The good news is is that the world is your oyster.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by sailingdom View Post

      Cold calling was always a mugs game. I made a lot of money from those mugs. My point is that cold calling is hard, there are now easier ways of discovering how hard it is to sell anything. So, you say, what do I do? Well, thanks for asking! What you do is work harder than your competition, be better than your competition and give better service than your competition. The good news is is that the world is your oyster.
      Similar to doing joint ventures......
      Waiting for your competition to go out of business is highly profitable.
      Of course, you're selling in the mean time.

      But when a business is ready to close, its inventory and customer lists are available for next to nothing.

      And you would be the only person making an offer anyway. How many companies are trying to buy a failing business' customer lists? Damn few.

      In my business (retail store vacuum cleaners) my fellow store keepers are dropping like flies. And when they are within 50 miles of me, I make sure I buy what's left, and get the customer list. Highly profitable.
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  • Profile picture of the author 479
    Originally Posted by RonGold View Post

    It seems as if the era of cold-calling has passed... or am I just doing it wrong?

    I've called plenty of businesses over the past week and I'm either just ringing through, or people aren't interested at all.

    I understand it's a numbers game.. but is it still viable? Is anyone else having success with cold calls?

    I think alot of it has to do with what you're offering, who you're calling, who you're talking to specifically (and broadly), and demographics. If you're calling the owner of a plumbing company about copywriting services, he has no idea what you're talking about and has is most likely to see no value in it. Keep in mind that the people who need digital marketing the most are small business owners. Statistically, they are also the ones who are least likely to use digital marketing or see any value in it. Copy writing is a necessary component of digital marketing and marketing in general. Very few, if any, small business owners are going to hire copy writers - even if their company website suck rotten eggs and have zero SEO and no blog content at all.



    I was a Certified Business Mentor for SCORE (a division of the US Small Business Administration) for about ten years where I talked to hundreds of small business owners. Even though each business or idea was unique in some ways, they all had the same problems: they wanted more leads, but refused to pay anything to get them and were all trying to do everything themselves with little to no experience.



    So personally, I would be contacting publishers, newspaper offices looking for stringers and freelancers, local newspapers and publications, tourist publications, local celebrity websites (if any), local TV stations, local resume services, and so on. I'd get on Indeed and look up remote work, as well and apply for twenty per day. After a few weeks, someone will respond.





    But I think telling you to simply "guard your game" or provide better services doesn't address anything specific. You could be the best there is in your region. If you don't market well, your well dries up.
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  • Profile picture of the author DirkMarden
    You still can catch some people...but I think, it's better to stop. You can use other tactics to attract clients who are really interested in yoursproduct.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ruth Taylor
    Originally Posted by RonGold View Post

    It seems as if the era of cold-calling has passed... or am I just doing it wrong?

    I've called plenty of businesses over the past week and I'm either just ringing through, or people aren't interested at all.

    I understand it's a numbers game.. but is it still viable? Is anyone else having success with cold calls?
    Yes, It still works, but most of the cold callers aren't aware of the relevant data where they can get more conversion.
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  • Profile picture of the author Nathan Isaac
    Cold calling is very effective, but you have to be good. Do your research in who you are calling, show them that you are different than everyone else who has called them.
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  • Profile picture of the author cearionmarie
    It can still produce some results but it would never be as effective as it was before. In the age of technology, people don't seem to have the time for that just as how it was before.
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  • Profile picture of the author bigbinhire
    They are still relevant if you use the proper way and reach to potential consumers.
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  • Profile picture of the author Pratik Ranjan
    Yep to depends upon the customer to customer and the caller who have the potential to attract the people and can influence people to buy their products.
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  • Profile picture of the author Reiters N
    Over the past little while I have seen a battle brewing between those who say cold calling is dead and those who claim it is alive and well .Of course each side has an agenda - one promoting social selling and the other promoting cold calling improvement coaching. Some people are defining cold calling differently than others, and this causes confusion. For the purpose of this post, cold calling means cold! Not merely the first call but an unexpected call out of the blue. In the old days, we used to call from lists pulled out of the yellow pages . The distinction is important because the social selling mantra calls for more evolved tactics to "warm up" a cold call and thus increase the efficiency and conversion of those calls.So, getting someone out of their busy zone is a skill- by picking up the phone and calling your clients or prospects, you are able to pull someone out of their daily schedule and get their full attention, even if only for a moment and that works.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Reiters N View Post

      Over the past little while I have seen a battle brewing between those who say cold calling is dead and those who claim it is alive and well .Of course each side has an agenda - one promoting social selling and the other promoting cold calling improvement coaching..

      Not so much here. On this Forum it's mostly a few that sell a different way than cold calling, VS the few that actively cold call.

      Maybe there is an agenda, but I don't see it.

      But yes, if I were listening to a speaker talk about cold calling...either way, they would either be a Social Media guru or a Cold Calling guru. Most Sales gurus stay away from promoting cold calling, because it's more acceptable to promote marketing systems that "do the work for you". And almost nobody wants to know how to cold call more effectively...because even effective cold calling is work.
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      Originally Posted by Reiters N View Post

      For the purpose of this post, cold calling means cold!
      ^^ This exactly.

      But that doesn't mean random calling. I cold call quite extensively to reach selected prospects of specifically targeted demographics, professions, and industries.

      All this nonsense about "warming up" prospects through social media, ranking in the search engines, giving away freebies, doing product "reviews", building lists, etc is generally way too much work and a waste of time just to get a few scraps - if anything at all.


      But strategic cold calling bulldozes through all that BS.
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      • Profile picture of the author animal44
        Originally Posted by myob View Post

        All this nonsense about "warming up" prospects through social media, ranking in the search engines, giving away freebies, doing product "reviews", building lists, etc is generally way too much work and a waste of time just to get a few scraps - if anything at all.
        Quick scan through thread, I can't find anyone - other than you - mentioning Social Media/SEO/Reviews as an alternative to cold calling.

        Indeed, I am almost as anti social media as a means of acquiring clients as I am cold calling... I'm sure an Ad will pull people away from their cat videos...

        And remember, the OP is not getting the results he expected from cold calling... Just like the majority of people...
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        • Profile picture of the author animal44
          Originally Posted by savidge4 View Post

          Better question is how long would it take you to make 9000 sales cold e-mailing?
          Why would you want to...?

          As far as the product owner is concerned, it was a cold email. They had never had any contact with the list before.

          Originally Posted by savidge4 View Post

          OR 9000 sales without a lifetime work of a network to rely on?
          I started this business about 6 years ago, everything from scratch. Hardly a "lifetime work of network"...

          Number one protege started from scratch and earned 4.4 million in commissions in her first year - she was 22, no sales/copywriting/marketing experience - she did better than my 2.6 million in my first year.

          I don't recall the actual number of sales, but I'm certain that it'd be physically impossible for a cold caller to make enough calls to come close to the number of sales we both made in our respective first year.
          Especially when you consider my number one protege was holding down a demanding full time job for most of that first year - she wouldn't have had the time to make the calls.

          And when starting out, back in the 1970's, a youthful Jay Abraham made some 3.5 million at his first attempt - equivalent to some 35 million in today's money?
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        • Profile picture of the author myob
          Originally Posted by savidge4 View Post

          Better question is how long would it take you to make 9000 sales cold e-mailing?
          An even better question is what is the most efficient method for maximizing sales?

          Cold e-mailing can be the most effective method for otherwise elusive demographics.

          Cold calling can be the most effective method for otherwise elusive demographics.

          Perhaps I wasn't clear about my marketing strategies. Cold calling is only one tool in my marketing arsenal. It is extremely powerful when leveraged with other marketing tools, as I have explained previously.

          I use every applicable marketing method - online and offline.

          For example, I get about 4-6 sales a day directly from cold calling. In addition, sales trickle in for months from each day's production. Curious prospects check me out online (I always leave contact info including website on voice mail and with gate keepers).

          Even an initial "no" sometimes results in a sale after the prospect does a google search. (Hint: suggest a search term for the prospect to use that you know will result at the top for your offer. "Check it out: underwater basket weaving".

          I only cold call about two hours max everyday. But once I find who the decision makers are, that's when the big guns come blasting out: email, post cards, sales letters, more phone calls, more email, more post cards, more sales letters, more phone calls, face-to-face meetings ...

          Based on my numbers, it takes about three years to make 9000 sales directly from cold calling approximately 450,000 cold leads (2% average conversion rate).

          But these sales and even many non-sales are leveraged into as much as 10 times that many or more in direct/indirect referrals, reorders, backend sales, new market exposure, my MLM business opportunity, etc.

          Some people just work way too hard.
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          • Profile picture of the author jv1999
            Originally Posted by myob View Post

            An even better question is what is the most efficient method for maximizing sales?

            Cold e-mailing can be the most effective method for otherwise elusive demographics.

            Cold calling can be the most effective method for otherwise elusive demographics.

            Perhaps I wasn't clear about my marketing strategies. Cold calling is only one tool in my marketing arsenal. It is extremely powerful when leveraged with other marketing tools, as I have explained previously.

            I use every applicable marketing method - online and offline.

            For example, I get about 4-6 sales a day directly from cold calling. In addition, sales trickle in for months from each day's production. Curious prospects check me out online (I always leave contact info including website on voice mail and with gate keepers).

            Even an initial "no" sometimes results in a sale after the prospect does a google search. (Hint: suggest a search term for the prospect to use that you know will result at the top for your offer. "Check it out: underwater basket weaving".

            I only cold call about two hours max everyday. But once I find who the decision makers are, that's when the big guns come blasting out: email, post cards, sales letters, more phone calls, more email, more post cards, more sales letters, more phone calls, face-to-face meetings ...

            Based on my numbers, it takes about three years to make 9000 sales directly from cold calling approximately 450,000 cold leads (2% average conversion rate).

            But these sales and even many non-sales are leveraged into as much as 10 times that many or more in direct/indirect referrals, reorders, backend sales, new market exposure, my MLM business opportunity, etc.

            Some people just work way too hard.

            What you say interests me, but what's easier to find -- a CEO's email or a CEO's phone #? Because if phone numbers are like candy and not buried treasure like emails seem to be, then I'm full ready to switch to phone-voicemail-leaving rather than emailing.. whatever gets me to spend less than 2 hrs finding info.
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            • Profile picture of the author myob
              Originally Posted by jv1999 View Post

              What you say interests me, but what's easier to find -- a CEO's email or a CEO's phone #? Because if phone numbers are like candy and not buried treasure like emails seem to be, then I'm full ready to switch to phone-voicemail-leaving rather than emailing.. whatever gets me to spend less than 2 hrs finding info.
              Unless you're selling something like large media advertising or equipment requiring major capital investments, you're wasting your time contacting CEO's by either email or phone.

              The reason I like cold-calling so much is because it's the fastest way I know to find, target, and connect with influencers, decision makers and buyers. Purchases are almost always made at various hierarchies or management levels far below the CEO.

              For example, I will often call a company's shipping department or customer service number to find out the specific and current names of those who can influence or do the buying for my products.

              Especially within large companies, there are usually quasi-independent department managers who are authorized to buy within pre-set budgets without having to go through a maze of nodding heads,

              What I do with cold calling is use a wide of array of Amazon and other affiliate products to prowl through levels of major corporate department heads.

              With each purchase, I can generally get at least 2-3 lateral referrals for department managers for other product lines, and eventually into upper management for incrementally higher end sales.

              But in my experience, the CEO seldom does any direct buying at all. There is usually a "purchasing department", which also should be completely avoided. At best, the CEO (or purchasing dept) may authorize purchases made by request or recommendation from lower management.
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by myob View Post


        But that doesn't mean random calling. I cold call quite extensively to reach selected prospects of specifically targeted demographics, professions, and industries.

        All this nonsense about "warming up" prospects through social media, ranking in the search engines, giving away freebies, doing product "reviews", building lists, etc is generally way too much work and a waste of time just to get a few scraps - if anything at all.


        But strategic cold calling bulldozes through all that BS.
        To me, all that social media business is suited to add Google results that say something nice about you, when someone does an online search about your industry or to check out your company.

        But as a way to support cold calls? No.Almost no person getting a cold call has seen you online before you called.

        On the other hand, I've seen direct mail used profitably to support calling a list of customers.

        I was talking to Bill Glazer at a large event he put on (maybe 5 years ago). I asked how he filled 1,000 seats with $1,500 each attendees. He said it was 22 separate direct mail offers to a list of buyers (previous attendees, product buyers, and joint ventures with other marketers). And then he told me that over half the seats were sold on the 23rd contact, with a teleshark making a last ditch effort.

        The benefit of direct mail is that the prospect actually sees it. Online social media marketing is almost never seen by a cold calling prospect, before you call.

        I had a customer a few days ago that sold life insurance. He knew I wrote books on selling (it happens sometimes), and asked me about prospecting. I asked how many clients he had now. He said "About 500".

        I told him that the single best result he could hope for is just calling his client list, to make an appointment for a "Courtesy checkup" of their coverage. Most people would say "OK" to that, and probably half would buy something else. A fast way to a ton of sales.

        Then I asked if he knew any agents that recently quit (or were about to). He did. I told him to offer them $1 for every client name (with applicable information) they had. I told him to call those names and tell them that he recently "bought the agency" and was their agent now.

        These agents that quit have mostly clients that were sold once and then forgotten (that's why they failed). This is low hanging fruit. Similar to joint ventures in that the credibility and connection is already made, but you don't share the profits...and it's done by phone (and then in person) instead of by mail (or online)....

        Added later; I forgot to mention that I also told this insurance guy that his clients have nearly all talked to a few people about their insurance plans. I told him to ask his clients who they may have talked to, and what was said. I told him that his clients were either complaining or bragging about him. The ones that were bragging? He should ask who they talked to...and call them. I said "80% will see you, and 90% of those will buy". Another income stream.

        My last few years selling in the field were contacting my old customers and running these lists of other dealers's customers.

        About Social Media Marketing. I've never known a "Social Media Marketing" guru..that sold their courses by social media. It was always through speaking (a form of joint venture with the event host) or through joint venture Webinars.

        I was speaking to a group of 300 mattress store owners about local online marketing. The previous speaker talked about social media (it's almost obligatory that someone talks about it at a marketing event). He made no sales, so I included the part (which, had he made sales, I would have removed) where I asked the audience...
        "Let's say you are going to buy a leather sofa, and you go online to find out about leather sofas.....How many will go on Facebook to get their information?"
        Of course, nobody raises their hand.
        "How many will go to Google and search for leather sofas?" Everyone raises their hand."And where will people go when looking for information on mattresses?"

        Why do I do that? Because the question about social media always gets asked, and I needed to eliminate it as an option.
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      • Profile picture of the author myob
        Originally Posted by animal44 View Post

        Quick scan through thread, I can't find anyone - other than you - mentioning Social Media/SEO/Reviews as an alternative to cold calling.

        Indeed, I am almost as anti social media as a means of acquiring clients as I am cold calling... I'm sure an Ad will pull people away from their cat videos...

        And remember, the OP is not getting the results he expected from cold calling... Just like the majority of people...
        Those alternatives to cold calling seems to me to have been implied, since the OP suggested that "the era of cold calling has passed". Those "alternatives" to cold calling I mentioned are actually quite widely discussed here on the forum.

        Actually, a closer look will show that people have been whining and complaining of failure at every one of these methods, saying they don't work or they're dead. But others are crushing it with all of them.

        So just because you are anti social media and anti cold calling, it does not mean these methods don't work. For me, ads don't work, nor does SEO, reviews, social media, email, blogging, webinars, etc as stand-alone marketing channels. But just because these don't work for me does not mean they are not effective for others.

        And I do agree that cold calling does not work ... for perhaps the majority of people. But this method is profoundly effective for many when it is done right, just as with every other marketing method. The power of synergy - using as many marketing tools as possible together - is a formidable force with a potential for beating out the competition in virtually any market.

        For example, the real magic of cold calling is that prospects will check you out online. I highly leverage this curiosity reaction whenever possible.

        And as I mentioned earlier in this thread, cold calling is not my primary marketing method. My primary marketing method has always been article syndication, (another method whose "era" has passed according to loud self-proclaimed pundits) which I have taught extensively here on this forum for years.

        Search "article syndication" by myob.

        Over the past 20 years, my articles have been widely distributed in online and offline publications, under dozens of niches and pseudonyms. This marketing model continues to drive massive quantities of highly convertible traffic.

        However, there are segments of my prospective demographics which are largely elusive even with this extensive exposure. For example, none of my websites have ever ranked above the murky depths of search engines. I decided years ago (mainly through early mentors) to never go head to head against stiff competition using the same marketing methods as the competition.

        Some of the most lucrative niches are mostly dominated by deep-pocketed marketing professionals using mass media and the search engines. For me, getting marketing traction in these arenas is impossible within any reasonable time frame using such "traditional" marketing practices. The marketing strategies I use bypass these heavily competitive marketing channels.

        This is why I do cold calling as a supplemental marketing strategy. This enables me to quickly identify key decision makers and/or influencers within my targeted markets.

        With every cold call (including "yes", "no", "indecisive", or voicemail) I leave them an invitation to check me out on the internet. For example, a quick (Check out "article {topic}" by {pseudonym}) leaves a highly favorable authoritative impression.

        Then these prospects are dripped with light seasoning through telephone followups, email, blogs, social media, product reviews/recommendations, webinars, and even face-to-face contact.

        Cold calling, done right, is still very much alive and well.
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        • Profile picture of the author animal44
          Originally Posted by myob View Post

          Cold calling, done right, is still very much alive and well.
          So tell me, because I think I missed your answer, how long would it take you to make over 9000 sales cold calling...?
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          What I do for a living

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          • Profile picture of the author myob
            Originally Posted by animal44 View Post

            So tell me, because I think I missed your answer, how long would it take you to make over 9000 sales cold calling...?
            Sorry you missed it. Read all my posts again. More carefully this time.
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            "If you're a true warrior, competition doesn't scare you. It makes you better." - Andrew Whitworth
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          • Profile picture of the author savidge4
            Originally Posted by animal44 View Post

            So tell me, because I think I missed your answer, how long would it take you to make over 9000 sales cold calling...?
            Better question is how long would it take you to make 9000 sales cold e-mailing? OR 9000 sales without a lifetime work of a network to rely on? - AND you can't use the phone or use social media.. I sure hope that fancy car of yours I want to crush with that JCB I find on social media can move real fast... 9000 sales is a lot of ground!
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            Success is an ACT not an idea
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      • Profile picture of the author myob
        Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post

        It's been many a year since I hammered away on the dog and bone (telephone).

        And it took a while before I realised that "cold calling" wasn't the best word.

        In essence you're mining for warm to good to hot prospects.

        Most found it an excruciating endurance.

        Because

        They "tried" to handle all the objections and expletives - (which took ages, rarely got anywhere and just made you emotionally frazelled).

        Much faster and a heck of a lot easier to get results by...

        Having a really good 10 second pitch and if you got a "No" (or worse) just say -

        "That's Ok, sorry for troubling you, let me leave you in peace - click "

        And without the agonising pressure keep dialling until you hear, "Ah, glad you called, cos I might be interested..."


        Steve
        This attitude when making cold calls will get you nowhere. When you get a "no" or any objection, that's actually when the selling process begins. True selling is a process, not an event. In my experience, the first objections are always a dismissive reflex or smokescreen. Cold callers are always considered a nuisance at first. Get over it.

        Every cold call starts off with a "no". But as long as the prospect stays on the phone, the chance for a positive outcome increases, although hardly ever results in a sale on the first contact. It generally takes about 4-6 "no's" to weed out true objections. This is really when real engagement and conversation begins.

        Here are some interesting industry stats on cold calling;

        60% of cold prospects will say no four times before saying yes
        44% sales people quit after first no
        22% more quit after the second no
        12% more quit after the third no
        14% more quit after the fourth no
        (Salesforce.com)

        In my own company, sales reps show an average 80% of sales are made on the 5th-12th contact.

        Is cold calling worth the aggravation and high rejection rate? When put in the perspective that every new customer has not only a high lifetime revenue potential, but also an even greater ROI in terms of market exposure and referrals - this is HUGE.

        The real power of cold calling is the exposure it can bring to your online assets - even after a "rejection". With every call, no matter what the outcome is (even voicemail), they are invited to either download a free product whitepaper or do a search on Google for my offer. By strategically suggesting key words, the exposure takes on an aura of authoritative status.

        I have found that leveraging "old school" cold calling with social and "Google" proof is an unbeatable marketing strategy. Google can be your friend even if your sites never show up in the SERPs.


        "Don't find customers for your products, find products for your customers." - Seth Godin
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by myob View Post

          "Don't find customers for your products, find products for your customers." - Seth Godin
          Yes. A huge secret to marketing success. Far easier to find a new product, than a new customer base.

          In my decades of selling vacuum cleaners in people's homes, I sold 7,200 vacuums. My guess is that the first 4,000-5,000 were almost all cold calls or cold door knocks.

          Lots of work (especially in the early years)...unnecessary work. Had I known what you just quoted, I could have sold 500 people...and lived off of those 500 customers for decades. Repeat sales and referrals would have been all I needed. I learned that at about the 30 year mark.

          I'm a slow learner.

          Apparently, I love to hear myself talk.



          Originally Posted by myob View Post

          This attitude when making cold calls will get you nowhere. When you get a "no" or any objection, that's actually when the selling process begins. True selling is a process, not an event. In my experience, the first objections are always a dismissive reflex or smokescreen. Cold callers are always considered a nuisance at first. Get over it.
          I think you and Steve may be talking about two different things.

          Steve's approach is to run through an apple orchard to pick all the low hanging fruit.
          Your approach is to keep going back to the orchard to see which fruit has ripened.

          Both approaches to cold calling over the phone obviously work. It depends on your list, number of available names to call, dollar amount of the sale, complexity of the sale, whether you are selling over the phone, or setting an appointment for a future personal sales call, lifetime customer value...and more.

          An industry example you might find interesting is selling life insurance to old people.

          One industry approach is to get the person to mail in a card for more information.
          Then the salesman calls the prospect on the phone, and sells over the phone. This generally requires an hour or more on the first call, and usually 3-5 repeated calls to get the sale. But the person who mailed in the card has indicated interest, so they are worth repeated attempts.

          The other approach is to cold call on the phone, finding people that are interested in life insurance, and you make a personal sales call. Almost every sale is made on the first call.

          In fact, when I sold life insurance (in my early 20s), my poor results from repeated contacts after a presentation caused me to just never make a call back....the results were so poor.

          Interestingly, the more calls I had to make to get an appointment, the better the chance that they would buy from me, because the repeated calls were a form of relationship.

          But if I were selling over the phone? it would have required multiple contacts.
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          • Profile picture of the author myob
            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

            I think you and Steve may be talking about two different things.

            Steve's approach is to run through an apple orchard to pick all the low hanging fruit.
            Your approach is to keep going back to the orchard to see which fruit has ripened.
            Actually my approach is more like looking for lush orchards. Then continuously shaking as many trees as possible. The fruit keeps on falling into my funnel machine for processing as it ripens.

            Don't get me wrong; I hate cold calling. It is not my primary prospecting method. But, I have found it to be the fastest and most effective method (for me) to find the best orchards.
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            • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
              Originally Posted by myob View Post

              Actually my approach is more like looking for lush orchards. Then continuously shaking as many trees as possible. The fruit keeps on falling into my funnel machine for processing as it ripens.

              Don't get me wrong; I hate cold calling. It is not my primary prospecting method. But, I have found it to be the fastest and most effective method (for me) to find the best orchards.
              Well said.

              I suspect strongly that if I knew the details of your business (or if any of us understood the methods/systems we each employ), there would be far less back and forth, debating this whole thing.


              By the way, my "orchard method" at the beginning was to just go through the orchard and shake the trees to see what fell off.

              Later, it was to check out my neighbor's orchard and offer to get rid of that nasty fruit about to litter their nice orchard.

              I also suspect strongly that if we all kept evolving and tweeking our businesses, we would end up just doing joint ventures with every other business with a list. About the most pure marketing approach I can think of.
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              • Profile picture of the author palmtreelife
                I suspect strongly that if I knew the details of your business (or if any of us understood the methods/systems we each employ), there would be far less back and forth, debating this whole thing.
                I have thought about this while reading through many threads! It seems like a lot of misunderstandings, but still very interesting conversations come out of it.

                I also suspect strongly that if we all kept evolving and tweeking our businesses, we would end up just doing joint ventures with every other business with a list. About the most pure marketing approach I can think of.
                I think greed is too powerful of an emotion and personality trait for this to happen. I could be wrong, but I've always believed if more people worked together, they could both get 10x more money and success and growth of their business 10x faster than going it alone.

                I see this odd phenomenon in real estate all the time. Person A knows nothing about real estate. They want to invest. They ask to partner with Person B who is experienced in real estate. Person B finds the right property, negotiates the deal, meets the conditions, closes the deal, vets tenants, manages the property, conducts regular maintenance and takes care of book keeping. Person A does nothing but provide the money. Person A does not feel 50/50 is fair and wants 70/30 (or more!). Of course, Person B turns down the offer and 5 years later Person A still has 0 properties because they want the whole pie without working for it. Had they taken the deal, they could be working on their 2nd or 3rd or 4th investment together by year 5. Owning 20% of 5 properties is much better than owning 100% of 1 property. Newbies don't get that though.

                As Claude would say...apparently, I like to hear myself talk.
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      • Profile picture of the author myob
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        I suspect strongly that if I knew the details of your business (or if any of us understood the methods/systems we each employ), there would be far less back and forth, debating this whole thing.
        Hopefully, I really don't come across as "debating", although perhaps I do tend to get overly defensive when people here loudly proclaim that viable marketing practices don't work, only because they have failed.

        Here on this forum over the years, we have seen virtually every conceivable marketing method listed as dead or dying. Yet elsewhere, these have always been vibrantly alive and thriving extremely well by countless others.

        Marketing and selling are tough, no matter what methods are being used. However, this is only part of running a business. People often mistakenly think of their marketing tactic as a business model. But marketing is just one component of many other essential factors widely considered to be best practices in a successful business.

        My business is selling high end Amazon and other affiliate products primarily through networking with influential business professionals. Deep in the backend of my funnel system is a MLM business opportunity offered to my best customers.

        The bulk of my marketing actually is done through article syndication in a wide distribution network of online/offline publications. This strategy has been detailed in many of my posts over the years. (Search "article syndication" by myob)

        Although I do get massive quantities of highly convertible traffic to my websites with this marketing strategy, there are still some targeted demographics which can only be reached through - cold calling. And I do mean cold calling. Like stone cold. These are influential business professionals whom I've never met.

        Although article syndication and cold calling are two of my top marketing methods, I also utilize email, blogs, social media, postal mail, webinars, video, offline seminars, trade shows, advertising, etc. Only about two or three of these methods are actually used in any particular niche. It is essential to match your marketing within the expectations of your targeted prospects.

        Some of the niches in which I sell affiliate products under dozens of different pseudonyms are in: health and fitness, telecommunications, robotics, astronomy, ancient history, geology, archaeology, medical diagnostic equipment, software, renewable energy, agriculture, apparel, personal development, interior design, weight loss, pharmaceuticals, golfing, baby boomer products, funeral products, sports, security, janitorial services, water treatment, weddings, asbestos litigation, conspiracies, UFOs, end of the world catastrophes, etc.
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      • I may be absolutely wrong.

        And could have cost myself gazillions.

        But years ago when I was cold calling...

        I never felt a sale or appointment would only be made after 3, 4, 5 or more "No's"


        I took the contrarian view when a cold prospect said "No"...

        It was increasingly difficult to go into "battle" and try and turn it it into a "Yes"

        Of course...

        It can be done and many will make the effort and reap the rewards.


        My ethos was just to acknowledge the "No's" and move on to "better" prospects,

        In the 10, 15, 20 minutes it may have taken to attempt to turn a "No" into a "Maybe" into a "Yes"...

        And as most will "No" my time would be eaten up.


        It was so much easier to diplomatically acknowledge the "No's" and keep dialing until I got to the "Yes's"

        It made cold calling much more enjoyable.

        And it was lucrative.


        Steve


        P.S. There were of course many times when the "I won't stop dealing with No's" sales people got better results than me.

        But often I was ahead and much less knackered. And the clients were more trouble free and less likely to "cancel"


        P.P.S. Interestingly, if I called back the "No's" a few weeks later - a good percentage remembered my "no hassle" technique and many surprisingly then said "Yes"
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      • Profile picture of the author myob
        I never consider cold calling to be a numbers "game", although every metric is tracked. For me, it is part of an overall marketing strategy. Of course a sale is always the primary objective, but leveraged exposure and systematic followup are the intended aftereffects.

        Getting the full attention of your prospect immediately is essential. Making small talk on the first call almost always will result in a sudden "not interested" or hang up. They get these annoying types of calls all the time.

        Trying to be overly friendly too soon or making small talk is almost always disengaging and an immediate deal-killer. This type of behavior is the mark of a time-wasting amateur - an annoying pest which can be dismissed by the flick of a finger.

        You need to be able to quickly answer the three most common (unspoken) objections within about 7 seconds ...
        Who are you?
        Where did you get my name?
        Why are you calling?

        Get these hidden objections out of the way immediately, or else your prospect will either hangup or keep wondering about that throughout your pitch without paying much attention to anything you say.

        What I do after a quick intro as above is to make a BIG claim: "This product has increased sales at companies like yours by as much as 40%..."
        Then acknowledge you understand how valuable their time is: "To be sure I'm not wasting your time, let me ask you..."
        Ask 3-4 qualifying questions.
        Be bold: "If what I am saying is only half true, are you the person to make a decision on a ($) investment?

        A few little tricks I learned from Grant Cardone:
        Send them a text message immediately after the call, no matter what the outcome. Sometimes I get callbacks after a "no".
        Leave a compressed pitch on voicemail; don't try to hide behind vague messages.
        Pitch the gatekeeper if she won't put you through to your prospect.
        Be prepared to be Googled. The prospect may be checking you out even while on the call.
        If you are courteous, professional, and show value, you may get referrals even from those "no's".
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  • Profile picture of the author naviown
    After reading the recent posts... damn I want to get myself into cold calling.
    Actually I have done somewhat cold-calling. But for payments instead of selling them products. Getting payments is a bit on the harder side. Isn't it?

    Where do I get started? Sign me up!
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  • It's been many a year since I hammered away on the dog and bone (telephone).

    And it took a while before I realised that "cold calling" wasn't the best word.

    In essence you're mining for warm to good to hot prospects.

    Most found it an excruciating endurance.

    Because

    They "tried" to handle all the objections and expletives - (which took ages, rarely got anywhere and just made you emotionally frazelled).

    Much faster and a heck of a lot easier to get results by...

    Having a really good 10 second pitch and if you got a "No" (or worse) just say -

    "That's Ok, sorry for troubling you, let me leave you in peace - click "

    And without the agonising pressure keep dialling until you hear, "Ah, glad you called, cos I might be interested..."


    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author ak432
      Still works...I've been cold calling business here in the UK and asking if they hire copywriters on a freelance basis.



      Managed to find a few interested prospects after going through a huge pile of no's
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  • Profile picture of the author Vendor Cetak
    They have small success rate.. Better use ur resources on SEO + Telemarketing (For hot prospects)
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  • Profile picture of the author ryanbiddulph
    Yes but for hyper clear, persistent folks.

    Tactics work if you believe on deepest levels.
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    Ryan Biddulph, Blogger, Author, World Traveling Digital Nomad
    Invest in my blogging course to live your wildest dreams through blogging.
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  • Hi Claude,

    Well...it was a few decades ago!

    Savings Plans - making appointments (back in the day we used the local telephone directory with a twist - we started at the back because so many others were using directories we assumed starting with the A's).

    Charity Raffle Tickets - making sales by phone

    Advertising - making appointments and making sales by phone


    I'm sure it won't have escaped your attention that my wonder technique was very much based on the books by Bill Good.

    In my time it was "Prospecting Your Way To Sales Success" - which became "Hot Prospects."


    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post

      Hi Claude,

      Well...it was a few decades ago!

      Savings Plans - making appointments (back in the day we used the local telephone directory with a twist - we started at the back because so many others were using directories we assumed starting with the A's).

      Charity Raffle Tickets - making sales by phone

      Advertising - making appointments and making sales by phone


      I'm sure it won't have escaped your attention that my wonder technique was very much based on the books by Bill Good.

      In my time it was "Prospecting Your Way To Sales Success" - which became "Hot Prospects."


      Steve
      Steve; I've read the Bill Good prospecting books. Good stuff.

      I get it now.

      Pure cold calls (not selected at all) to set appointments? I did it as well for years.

      It was very easy to get rid of me on the phone. I just wanted to get that one great guy that I could show my product. Yeah, if you're cold calling for appointments, and your leads (names) are free and unlimited, it makes sense to just sort out the few great prospects.

      After just a year or so, I figured out that it took me a couple of hours at least to make a sale in person, so I wanted to make sure they were likely to buy before I made the trip.

      And raffle tickets are a very simple, low dollar one call sale.

      Where a cold caller might want to keep a person on the phone, establishing rapport, is if they are selling on that phone call, or are trying to sell on a subsequent phone call....and if the actual presentation is relatively short.

      Also, if you paid for the lead, which was already marginally qualified...you would put maximum effort into every lead, because they are pre-qualified, already showed interest, the lead wasn't cheap, and you have a limited list to call.

      And...when selling over the phone, it really does usually take several calls (of long conversations) to finalize the sale.

      Even Jordan Belfort (The Wolf Of Wall Street) finally said that they usually closed a sale on the 3rd call.

      But even selling in homes, knocking on doors, I didn't try hard at all to gt in the door. I was very easy to say "No" to at the door, or before I presented my product...and very hard to say "No" to, when I was closing, because I wasn't making a return trip.

      Good stuff in this thread, I think.
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  • Very, very good point on making the extra special effort on pre-qualified leads.

    As you said they usually come at a price and as they have at least an interest in the product or service it's well worth persisting.

    When it comes to the "close" - I think I hold the view that after 3 attempts it may be time to call it a day.

    Because something was well astray with the presentation, or the prospect has some kind of objection, possibly a bias or whatever and they just won't let go of it.

    Yes, I know, I know the adage is you don't get a sale until the 7th close...(but by this time I probably don't want or even deserve the order!).


    I might have one final shot and say something like " At this stage most people want to go ahead, have I
    done something, or missed something that has upset you in anyway?"

    If they spill the beans then it can usually be handled.

    Unless they say, "Sorry Steve, our company policy is we never, ever do business with people born in Glasgow, Scotland"

    In which case I'm f*****.


    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post

      When it comes to the "close" - I think I hold the view that after 3 attempts it may be time to call it a day.

      Because something was well astray with the presentation, or the prospect has some kind of objection, possibly a bias or whatever and they just won't let go of it.

      Yes, I know, I know the adage is you don't get a sale until the 7th close...(but by this time I probably don't want or even deserve the order!).
      When I was selling in home, and had already invested a couple of hours in the presentation...I would continue to close as long as I could tell they were thinking about buying...or getting closer to buying. If they started pulling away (repeating objections, losing the warmth in their voice) I knew I had lost the sale. But I could keep at it for another hour, if I saw that they were going to buy.

      But I eventually learned to just segment out the people that were highly likely to buy from me (for various reasons) and usually it was just one attempt or two that did it.


      That whole "It takes 7 closing attempts to get a sale" claim originally came from the 1950s advertising business. An agency did a focus group, and found that it took an average of 7 (or sometimes stated as 5) repetitions before the average person remembered the brand name..

      That eventually got passed around and got repeated. So now it's a variation of
      "Customers have to see 5 ads before they will call"
      "It takes 7 closing attempts before they buy"
      "It takes 5 calls before they make an appointment"
      "It takes an average of 7 visits before they buy"

      And it gets passed around like gospel. But it had nothing to do with sales at all. Just brand name recognition.

      Now, the truth is, some sales require repeated closing attempts, some require repeated calls for an appointment, some require a few follow ups....

      But it's all over the map, depending on the offer, the prospect list, cold call or qualified lead, inbound or outbound marketing, how many people you have to talk to, whether it's one sale you are after, or building a relationship...etc.
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  • I can often tell within a few minutes if a prospect is likely or unlikely to buy (there are exceptions and a few surprises).

    But if in my heart of hearts I know that a prospect will genuinely benefit from and can afford the product or service I would certainly go the extra mile or hour - hopefully with a coffee or tea refill(s).

    Of course on a cold call it's unlikely I would know this ( it applies to "qualified" appointments).


    Also I've always disliked the word "objection" I much prefer "concerns."

    And a sale is only really worth getting for both the prospect and the sales person if all these are all handled.

    If not, and even if you close the sale, you can get a very anxious and at times a very "difficult" client.


    Steve


    P.S. You can of course deal with most "concerns" during the presentation again showing that 7 closes is usually never necessary.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post


      P.S. You can of course deal with most "concerns" during the presentation again showing that 7 closes is usually never necessary.
      The last few years I was selling my local online marketing service for $5,999......

      I would either get no objection..or one. That's if they bought. Because these sales involved substantial work on my part (to fulfill), I really only wanted people that were eager to get started.

      But these are people that I qualified heavily before I started my presentation. And most had either read a book I wrote, or watched me speak from the stage. They were pretty pre-sold by the time I talked to them.

      Yeah, these aren't really "Objections", more like questions or efforts to put off a decision, without breaking rapport. I don't know why we call them Objections, they rarely are.
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post


      Also I've always disliked the word "objection" I much prefer "concerns."

      The first few "objections" are usually just a smokescreen or attempts to blow you off. When you get past that, the real "concerns" begin to appear. That's when you begin to connect with your prospect.

      It can take a looooong time to really make that "connection", so the average salesperson looking for "low hanging fruit" hardly ever gets into any effective communication.

      For example, in my cold calling, 80% of the initial sales comes after 5-12 contacts.

      I average 4-7 no's per call, and less than 2% of initial calls results in a sale.

      This may sound like a rather dismal outcome, but when the competition gives up, that's when I'm just warming up.

      In my marketing niches, the competition is quite intense. I have found that cold calling is the fastest way to crash through obscurity.

      Getting lots of no's also makes you well known. Even the "no's" will often check you out online after a call.

      I call this "targeted cold calling with intent". I use this strategy for targeting specific influential business professionals and decision makers who generally have large networks for potential referrals. For me, it is well worth it.

      One of my early mentors told me a story about a young man who had a reputation for picking up women with little more than a crude one line proposition. Of course, he got slapped a lot - but he also closed a lot (got laid).

      So, just keep smiling and dialing! Some will, some won't, so what ... next.
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      "If you're a true warrior, competition doesn't scare you. It makes you better." - Andrew Whitworth
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  • One way to blast through the smokescreens of "false" No's - or any No...

    Is having a spellbindingly good but short opening pitch.

    Not the usual "Hi, I'm so and so, from where and where - how are you, how's your day going blah, blah blah."

    (yes, many may say it helps with rapport but as the prospect doesn't know you - a neon light can furiously flash in his or her head saying "get rid of the salesperson!")


    But a quick "Hi" and straight into the incredible, unique and irresistible benefit or offer your product or service has.

    Can fuse the warning light, blow away any cobwebs and grab people's interest, attention and curiosity.

    Not a bad idea to finish the 10 -15 seconds worth of wonder words with an open ended question.

    Making it a touch more difficult for the prospect to say "No."


    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post


      Not the usual "Hi, I'm so and so, from where and where - how are you, how's your day going blah, blah blah."
      It doesn't help rapport at all. It's irritating when solicitors use small talk to open a call.

      Cold calling (in fact any phone call) is an interruption. Don't make it worse by wasting their time with small talk.

      Rapport building isn't a step in the sales process, it's woven throughout the call. Rapport develops as you go along.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jonathan 2.0
      Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post

      But a quick "Hi" and straight into the incredible, unique and irresistible benefit or offer your product or service has.
      Love it. : ) Thanks Steve.
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  • Yes, a cold call has likely broken rapport before it had a chance to start.

    Build it up by getting on with the pitch and not letting the prospect feel you are being disingenuous with the "how the devil are you" stuff.

    The sooner they realise you genuinely have something of great value for them the better.


    Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author kyurin
    There are so many ways to cold reach your clients if cold-calling is not your thing. It's not dead though, you just need to be really good at it. I personally suck at cold-calling and hate it, but still got to do it among other things to get clients.

    One thing that people usually forgets that calling someone is interrupting whatever they are doing. Be super brief what you are offering and try to book a meeting (face to face, Skype or a phone meeting) where they got more time to concentrate on the topic. And if they are just not interested, move on to the next one.

    It's all a numbers game like you said. Do emails and DM's on social media as well.
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  • To me selling always has been and always will be a numbers game.

    Of course we would very much like to close every sale - but we won't.

    The way I came to terms with this was realizing that "closing" was great - after a bit of effort you have a perfect prospect now a delighted client - a very pleasurable way to make your income.

    The "pain" was getting to the "perfect" clients.

    But look at the maths.

    Let's say on average, no matter what - you get a sale after ten calls (i know the numbers vary but average them out).

    And the sale earns you $1,000.

    So, each call - including the 9 "go away and don't come backs" and the 1 "Yes what a bazzing product, I want it now!"...

    Made you $100.00.

    Da Daa.

    Very soon you're never bothered about the "No's" - they are all making you money.


    Steve


    P.S. You can look at it another way - usually a successful sale is fun, a good chat and everybody is happy - who needs to be paid for that.

    You're really been paid for putting up with all the rejections.
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  • Agree with everything you say...

    And as every "metric" is tracked which they should be (or you lose all sense of direction).

    This is knowing the "numbers."

    My way of explaining it is a "numbers game."

    Sounds a bit more fun - which for me always helps.

    Not to be confused with being blaise or frivolous.

    Selling is important - the service or product must be sold.

    I just want it to be as enjoyable as possible - a really good "game" where everybody wins.

    A "get lost Steve" prospect isn't hassled and neither am I - and an "interested" prospect gets exactly what they want.

    Which creates a goodly income for me.


    Steve


    P.S. Texting hadn't been invented when I was cold calling! - but it's a heck of a good idea to send one regardless of the outcome of the call.

    Cements the appointment or sale.

    And can turn a "No" into a "Yes."
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  • Profile picture of the author aduttonater
    Cold calling is still affective. I follow a straight line formula when attempting to sell on the first call.
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  • Profile picture of the author Techs
    I wouldn't have thought it to be affective still so I'm quite surprised. No judgment on it - I just neverarelypick up a call from numbers I don't know
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      Originally Posted by Techs View Post

      I just neverarelypick up a call from numbers I don't know
      Most people don't pick up their phone from unknown callers. But they will almost always check out a website left on voice mail. Frequent additional value-added calls left on voice mail adds incremental familiarity.
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  • Profile picture of the author SteveSki
    You may know that the more conversations you have with prospects the faster you will get business. Even though you know that, I want to know to what degree you live it. ~
    Djukich, Dusan. Straight-Line Leadership: Tools for Living with Velocity and Power in Turbulent Times (p. 50). Corporate Reinvention and Associates. Kindle Edition.

    In my photography business, I use to get business by cold calling but seldom have to make a cold call any more thanks to the Light-up LED Shirts I wear when in prospecting mode. Often people will ask me about it or I simply walk up to them saying... I see you noticed my shirt... here's a brochure that explains but before you leave can I get your opinion on which of these poses (Show iPad Photo Album) do you think your child would like best?

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  • Profile picture of the author webexpert2016
    It depends what you selling and which is the traffic source . People do not like to get call for same product every day when they need it once in a month
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  • Profile picture of the author Pentagram
    My opinion: Yes it was, still is and probably will always still be effective. You never know unless you try. The client might be very interested in the product/service you are offering.
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  • Profile picture of the author alanclarc143
    Cold calling is still effective but you should follow certain rule and regulations. And is totally depend on customers that he is interested or not. So I think it is not best but still, it working.
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  • Profile picture of the author jv1999
    I think it's weird that most of this thread talks about "cold calling" = outbound. We're in the age where you can get a civilian car to drive you anywhere because you joined an app on your phone (no calling required).


    Isn't outbound marketing supposed to be email now?


    That said, I've had my fair share of success and failurez with outbound email marketing. was looking for some insight...


    For example, how can you find CEO emails for free or low cost? I have to find at least 3k emails per month. Rocketreach and other providers have insane prices like $400 for only like 100 to 350 emails found.


    Does anyone know how to find CEO emails for cheap? I don't mind doing the legwork, but it's just that finding 100 ceo emails takes over 2 hours, and that's just not efficient.
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    • Profile picture of the author animal44
      Originally Posted by jv1999 View Post

      Isn't outbound marketing supposed to be email now?
      Who says...?

      Originally Posted by jv1999 View Post

      Does anyone know how to find CEO emails for cheap? I don't mind doing the legwork, but it's just that finding 100 ceo emails takes over 2 hours, and that's just not efficient.
      Pay someone. My research assistant is pretty cheap and would come out cheaper that the price you quote. $400 is about 3 days work...

      However, it probably won't do you much good. Most CEOs I know don't read their emails. Their assistants do the reading and only pass on what's relevant. And marketing messages are rarely, if ever, relevant...

      Want to get in front of an inaccessible CEO? Find someone who already has their ear. And get them to introduce you...
      Start with existing clients.

      Edit:
      Just saw those numbers
      Originally Posted by jv1999 View Post

      I have to find at least 3k emails per month.
      If I were employing you, I'd be more interested in the number of sales you make, not some random number of emails...

      If you're in the US, the libraries have a free database of companies (referenceUSA), with contact details. All you need is a library card. Each search is limited to 250 entries, however you can do multiple searches, so could come up with 3k emails in a few hours... Not all have emails, but I'm sure you could find enough...
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    • Profile picture of the author palmtreelife
      I don't mind doing the legwork, but it's just that finding 100 ceo emails takes over 2 hours, and that's just not efficient.
      If you don't consider that legwork, then what exact work are you willing to do to get what you want? 3k emails at 100 emails/2hr is 1 week of working only 8hr days.

      Sure there might be other ways, but I just found it curious that you said you're ok to do the work, but in the same sentence said you don't want to work 1 week to hit your target.
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  • Profile picture of the author KrRoksana
    Now the cold calls have turned into cold leaves. I can not say good or bad. Finding a mailing address is easier now than a phone number.
    I think that the cold vocation helps cold sending. It's like a couple for your success. Build your strategy and try all different. Because everything depends on you, your are copyrights and your speech technique.
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  • Profile picture of the author KIRBYTMC
    Cold Calling to a direct sales pitch is dead.

    Cold Calls to WARM UP a Prospect and offer Help with "what's in it for them" still works.
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