What Do You If A Prospect or Client Asks You - "Do You Have An Office?" - The Solution!

36 replies
Hey All,

Steve here.

I just wanted to bring up something that hit one of my coaching clients last month.

He actually has rather a lot of money, offline marketing is his new business - so he can afford an office, but chooses to work at home.

Of course, some of my other students, and a lot of my customers don't have an office either, not out of choice.

The offline dream is great - only if you can start easily and cheaply.

Right now, for some people, getting onto offline seems hard anyway (it isn't) and the thought of people asking if they have an office scares the --- out of them.

Heck, me and Eddie dealt with that situation because we used to meet people in the office block coffee shop first.

So - we got the infamous question:

"So, do you guys have an office"

...of course, we had the option to say, 'yes we do'.

However, it became clear that the root cause of the question, we discovered was much deeper.

Answer without knowing this deeper level, and you could lose a deal.

The fact is - just being asked this question can fill people with fear.

What would you do?
  1. Answer honestly and say - yes or no to having an office (with excuses why?)
  2. Lie and say that you do, but you travel around
  3. Change the conversation to something else

    Or
  4. Briefly answer yes or no and then head back in the process to deal with the real objection.

I guess there is a bonus point up for grabs if you can name the real objection that your prospect has!

Seriously though - I would love to hear people's thoughts and responses - last time I did this - we generated some amazing value.

So - how would you answer - "do you have an office?"
#asks #client #do you have an office #solution
  • Profile picture of the author Tiduslite8
    My reply is that I work from home. It doesn't make sense to me to have to charge my clients more in order to pay for office space that is not needed for the work they will receive.
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    • Profile picture of the author Steve Peters Benn
      Originally Posted by Tiduslite8 View Post

      My reply is that I work from home. It doesn't make sense to me to have to charge my clients more in order to pay for office space that is not needed for the work they will receive.
      I think that is a good answer - you are giving them a reason why you don't have one - it saves them money!
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  • Profile picture of the author vok
    You could always get a virtual address. But if you're a one man band people are going to work at home because that's the cheapest option. True business people understand the reasons that you are working from your home.

    Now with the price of fuel, it makes more sense than ever to work from home if you have that option available to you.
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    • Profile picture of the author Steve Peters Benn
      Originally Posted by chriswick View Post

      You could always get a virtual address. But if you're a one man band people are going to work at home because that's the cheapest option. True business people understand the reasons that you are working from your home.

      Now with the price of fuel, it makes more sense than ever to work from home if you have that option available to you.
      If you seem an expert - the office becomes a lot less of an issue.

      A virtual address can be useful.

      I've got a very simple way to stop this question being asked - but it doesn't deal with the underlying causes of this question - and we need to answer those hidden objections as well as the more obvious ones.
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  • Profile picture of the author Morgan Westerman
    I'd say option 4 above....

    I think if a potential client is asking "Do you have an office?" that's a closing question.
    They probably wouldn't care if they weren't interested. What they want to know is
    will they be able to contact you if they need help. Are you gonna be around if they
    sign a contract with you.

    I'd answer truthfully either, "Yes, let me give you our office address, it's _______________. And all of our business details, including my personal contact info will be in your welcome pack. Let's get you started and I'll get that right over to you...."

    OR, "Actually I work from home. Our team meets online often and work together for our clients. In fact I'm sure you'll be meeting my assistant when we go over your welcome pack. But don't worry, I live and work in the city and am easy to reach 24/7. Are you ready to get started?"
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    • Profile picture of the author Steve Peters Benn
      Originally Posted by Morgan Westerman View Post

      I'd say option 4 above....

      I think if a potential client is asking "Do you have an office?" that's a closing question.
      They probably wouldn't care if they weren't interested. What they want to know is
      will they be able to contact you if they need help. Are you gonna be around if they
      sign a contract with you.

      I'd answer truthfully either, "Yes, let me give you our office address, it's _______________. And all of our business details, including my personal contact info will be in your welcome pack. Let's get you started and I'll get that right over to you...."

      OR, "Actually I work from home. Our team meets online often and work together for our clients. In fact I'm sure you'll be meeting my assistant when we go over your welcome pack. But don't worry, I live and work in the city and am easy to reach 24/7. Are you ready to get started?"
      it can be a closing question - a last minute worry.

      Or it can indicate that they are more worried if you are going to be around in the future. In other words - can we rely on this person?

      Is this their passion?

      Or, will they move onto something else next week?

      Big thing to remember here is that SEO and webdesign have been around for an awful long time now.

      A lot of bad bad people have gotten into these businesses and poisoned them.

      The chances are, the prospect you are talking with has either been burned by one of these bad SEO or webdesigners, or they know someone who has.
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  • Profile picture of the author TimCastleman
    I tell them I work out of my office here at the cigar lounge (smoking a CAO as I type this) but I'd be happy to meet them at a coffee shop (two doors down), at lunch, or at their office.

    My point is - if you don't make it a big deal - they normally don't.

    Also if they have that big of a problem with it I doubt I want them as customers.

    Tim
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    • Profile picture of the author Steve Peters Benn
      Originally Posted by TimCastleman View Post

      I tell them I work out of my office here at the cigar lounge (smoking a CAO as I type this) but I'd be happy to meet them at a coffee shop (two doors down), at lunch, or at their office.

      My point is - if you don't make it a big deal - they normally don't.

      Also if they have that big of a problem with it I doubt I want them as customers.

      Tim
      Tim - that is GOLD. Solid gold.

      Someone who is real %$£$@$ about it obviously isn't the type of client you want - it's a hard lesson for a lot of offline marketers to learn I guess -but so valuable.
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      • Profile picture of the author TE2
        Answer #4 which for me is...

        I work from a home office and a "Virtual" office. When they ask what a virtual office is, I explain that I can work from anywhere that has an Internet connection or a cell tower. I can work when and where I need to and I am reachable.

        And I believe their real concern is knowing that you are not some flight-by-night contractor who's going to disappear with their money overnight. They want peace of mind when doing business.

        Regards,

        John
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        • Profile picture of the author Steve Peters Benn
          Originally Posted by TE2 View Post

          Answer #4 which for me is...

          I work from a home office and a "Virtual" office. When they ask what a virtual office is, I explain that I can work from anywhere that has an Internet connection or a cell tower. I can work when and where I need to and I am reachable.

          And I believe their real concern is knowing that you are not some flight-by-night contractor who's going to disappear with their money overnight. They want peace of mind when doing business.

          Regards,

          John
          I think that is a huge concern for so many potential clients precisely because they have been burned before.

          It's not like when this was all starting out, and you had to educate the prospect. The likelihood is, they have been approached before, and maybe burned.

          Having an office, a place they can go to if things go wrong, is something that prospects look for when worried, or nervous.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jackie Tulos
    Once my business is bigger, I plan on getting office that is shared with other people. You have a person who answers the phone, gets your mail, and acts like an employee but isn't. Also you do a have furnished office if you do want to meet clients there, and they do have a conference room you can use for bigger meetings. Also they have offices in other towns you can use while out of town. They have these in all cities big and small, in fact there is one 1 mile from my home for only $200 a month.
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    • Profile picture of the author Steve Peters Benn
      Originally Posted by Jackie Tulos View Post

      Once my business is bigger, I plan on getting office that is shared with other people. You have a person who answers the phone, gets your mail, and acts like an employee but isn't. Also you do a have furnished office if you do want to meet clients there, and they do have a conference room you can use for bigger meetings. Also they have offices in other towns you can use while out of town. They have these in all cities big and small, in fact there is one 1 mile from my home for only $200 a month.
      Hey Jackie,

      Here is a good reason not to own your own office.



      Go away for Christmas and New Year. Come back your door smashed in by the fire service, because the pipes burst over the holiday period.

      Starbucks, down below, had come in to find they were flooded.

      All thanks to those broken pipes.

      Eek! Poor Eddie.
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      • Profile picture of the author Jackie Tulos
        Originally Posted by Steve Peters Benn View Post

        Hey Jackie,

        Here is a good reason not to own your own office.



        Go away for Christmas and New Year. Come back your door smashed in by the fire service, because the pipes burst over the holiday period.

        Starbucks, down below, had come in to find they were flooded.

        All thanks to those broken pipes.

        Eek!
        I would not have that problem because you are renting just the address and am not responsible for the up keep. Here is the company I will be using. Regus | Office Space, Virtual Offices & Meeting Rooms to Rent
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        Jackie Tulos
        Would you like to know how to get customers from Facebook? Click here for a free report.Want a free video tutorial on using Google Places and how to set up your business for free, click here.
        www.TargetedLocal.com
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  • Profile picture of the author mouseffects
    Because I'm an online entity I don't have a problem telling people that I am FORTUNATE ENOUGH to work from home. My office is the laptop I carry. Once I equate my situation to the online world, I seldom get looks or feedback about my office situation.

    Especially when I'm pulling out my wallet to pay for lunch.

    Keeping things positive instead of (almost) apologizing for not having one will make all of the difference in the world.

    I get a lot of people saying, "Wow! You are one of those who go to work in your pajamas!". And, my standard response is, "Oh, you're supposed to wear pajamas???"

    What a great ice-breaker.

    PS. I had an office for about 10 years and have been working from my home for the past 2+. This is MUCH better.
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    • Profile picture of the author Steve Peters Benn
      Originally Posted by mouseffects View Post

      Because I'm an online entity I don't have a problem telling people that I am FORTUNATE ENOUGH to work from home. My office is the laptop I carry. Once I equate my situation to the online world, I seldom get looks or feedback about my office situation.

      Especially when I'm pulling out my wallet to pay for lunch.

      Keeping things positive instead of (almost) apologizing for not having one will make all of the difference in the world.

      I get a lot of people saying, "Wow! You are one of those who go to work in your pajamas!". And, my standard response is, "Oh, you're supposed to wear pajamas???"

      What a great ice-breaker.

      PS. I had an office for about 10 years and have been working from my home for the past 2+. This is MUCH better.
      Fantastic one liner! I love it.

      Paying for lunch (and addressing basic needs) is one of those time honoured techniques that does work. Like gangbusters.

      The ultimate money magnet.
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  • Profile picture of the author Creativegirl
    Until they experience this for themselves and get comfortable with their business, it will continue to be an unfounded fear. In today's marketplace the location of an office is rarely a deal breaker, especially at home.

    Be honest in answering them and develop a pat answer that you're comfortable with. I usually say "I have 2 studio offices in the home." It's true. I also make a policy not to have foot traffic or invite prospects in. Clients on occasion, yes. New advertisers that want to drop off money and "see" me, yes, but I control it.

    For the past five years I've met most prospects and clients at their office (1st choice), local coffee shops and my local chamber (using their conference table).

    Personally I think it comes from insecurity, fueled by fear of the unknown. I tell people a storefront or office will guarantee a certain percent of business. But is does not guarantee repeat business and will not capture everyone. If you can afford it, set up a public office, but in no way does it deter from your success. If a prospect makes it a deal breaker be thankful, you didn't want them as a client anyway.
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  • Profile picture of the author Steve Peters Benn
    The question itself shouldn't be a deal breaker, but there are a variety of underlying causes that can be behind the question that can cause real problems.
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  • Profile picture of the author Steve Peters Benn
    Meeting clients at their office is an excellent strategy btw!
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  • Profile picture of the author Hank
    Great post, Steve. The "office question" I believe speaks to whether you are an established business with roots, a history, and some sort of an organizational structure in place.

    The inference is that if you have an office, you most likely have other clients, employees, fixed costs, elements of "legitimacy" that spell security and longer term reliability and stability.

    Although I've rarely been asked the question, I have previously answered with:
    "Though I do keep an office, it is primarily utilized by various staff for technical and administrative functions, as most client-facing work takes place at clients' offices throughout the city and I'm hardly ever there."

    Cheers,

    Hanif
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    • Profile picture of the author Steve Peters Benn
      Hey Hanif,

      Spot on I think - they are looking for something permanent, something you can't just stuff in a suitcase and run off with.

      It's sad that the worry is there for some clients, but there are cowboys out there.

      People get stung -and when they ask 'do you have an office' - the office might be the least of their worries...



      Originally Posted by Hank View Post

      Great post, Steve. The "office question" I believe speaks to whether you are an established business with roots, a history, and some sort of an organizational structure in place.

      The inference is that if you have an office, you most likely have other clients, employees, fixed costs, elements of "legitimacy" that spell security and longer term reliability and stability.

      Although I've rarely been asked the question, I have previously answered with:
      "Though I do keep an office, it is primarily utilized by various staff for technical and administrative functions, as most client-facing work takes place at clients' offices throughout the city and I'm hardly ever there."

      Cheers,

      Hanif
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  • Profile picture of the author Voasi
    I've been asked this many times over the years, sometimes I had an office, sometimes I hadn't. Currently, I don't have an office (but my partner is getting one this month for sales reps).

    My typically response is this:

    "No, I actually work out of my home - I only work with a select few clients and like to keep my business small and profitable. I don't want to grow and have a huge office, with overhead and have to raise my rates. I want to enjoy life and provide extreme value to my clients so I don't have an office. If you want to meet, I can schedule to meet at a conference room".

    You can rent out conference rooms if you need to, or you can meet at a Panera Bread, Starbucks or any other location that has internet access, if need-by.

    I haven't run across a business owner that doesn't "get" it, and if they don't, they're not for me.
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  • Profile picture of the author Steve Peters Benn
    The select few clients bit is top notch. It sounds like you have gotten good at filtering out the bad eggs.
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  • Profile picture of the author mrmatt
    If people ask I just tell them I work from home. I have yet to have anyone object to this. Because they are all jealous and want to work from home too.

    Mainly when I get asked that question it is because people want to meet with me or drop by.

    I meet with clients either at their place or at a restaurant or coffee shop. They always buy which is nice.

    I may get an office someday. But I really like that pajama commute.
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  • Profile picture of the author John Durham
    Answer to the question "Do you have an office"

    "Are you kidding me? LOL" (Ad liberally from there).
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  • Profile picture of the author John Walsh
    When asked the question, "Do you have an office", I respond..."Why do you ask?", or "Is my having an office, important to you?" If it is important to them, I quickly terminate the conversation because they will become a member of "the dreaded circle of doom" client, who is never happy. Don't need them, don't want them because you see, I decide who I'm going to work with. I work for myself because I don't like bosses and I set the rules...not arrogant, just particular.
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    • Profile picture of the author TE2
      Originally Posted by John Walsh View Post

      When asked the question, "Do you have an office", I respond..."Why do you ask?", or "Is my having an office, important to you?" If it is important to them, I quickly terminate the conversation because they will become a member of "the dreaded circle of doom" client, who is never happy. Don't need them, don't want them because you see, I decide who I'm going to work with. I work for myself because I don't like bosses and I set the rules...not arrogant, just particular.
      John,

      I like your style!

      Being in control is what I am all about.

      Many, many moons ago, a small company that was in red ink hired me as their VP of Sales & Operations in order to turn the company around.

      After a short time with them, it became clear that we had some "dogs" for clients. The ones that cost us more time and expense to service than we made from them. I told the two owners that we were going to "Fire some customers" and they were shocked and said we can't do that.

      I said sure we can but we aren't going to be blatant or belligerent about it, rather we'd be stealthy.

      We simply stopped giving them competitive pricing on our quotes. Problem solved, and what's even better... they became our competitor's problem.

      But the best way is how you did it, screen them out during the selling cycle!

      Regards,

      John
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      • Profile picture of the author Steve Peters Benn
        Originally Posted by TE2 View Post

        John,

        I like your style!

        Being in control is what I am all about.

        Many, many moons ago, a small company that was in red ink hired me as their VP of Sales & Operations in order to turn the company around.

        After a short time with them, it became clear that we had some "dogs" for clients. The ones that cost us more time and expense to service than we made from them. I told the two owners that we were going to "Fire some customers" and they were shocked and said we can't do that.

        I said sure we can but we aren't going to be blatant or belligerent about it, rather we'd be stealthy.

        We simply stopped giving them competitive pricing on our quotes. Problem solved, and what's even better... they became our competitor's problem.

        But the best way is how you did it, screen them out during the selling cycle!

        Regards,

        John
        John,

        I think quite a few of us have been there. Still, most people don't talk about it or have the guts to fire a customer.

        I fired a few during 2010 - they were major pains in the...

        Well, you get the idea...
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        • Profile picture of the author TE2
          Originally Posted by Steve Peters Benn View Post

          John,

          I think quite a few of us have been there. Still, most people don't talk about it or have the guts to fire a customer.

          I fired a few during 2010 - they were major pains in the...

          Well, you get the idea...

          Steve,

          I'm down with that.

          And may I add that the Pareto Principle applies once again.

          - 20% of your customer bring you 80% of your business
          - 20% of our customers will take up 80% of your time with problems
          - That 20% doesn't necessarily (and usually doesn't) overlap
          - Your good customers are rarely in that 20% problem space

          I wish I could explain it better, but I think you undertsand what I am trying to state.

          Regards,

          John
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          • Profile picture of the author Steve Peters Benn
            Originally Posted by TE2 View Post

            Steve,

            I'm down with that.

            And may I add that the Pareto Principle applies once again.

            - 20% of your customer bring you 80% of your business
            - 20% of our customers will take up 80% of your time with problems
            - That 20% doesn't necessarily (and usually doesn't) overlap
            - Your good customers are rarely in that 20% problem space

            I wish I could explain it better, but I think you undertsand what I am trying to state.

            Regards,

            John
            Hi John,

            I've had a few bad clients over the years, who, when they were fired, made my life (and often Eddie and PG tips' lives) much better...

            One was a friend who constantly asked for discounts, all the while he was making a ton.

            Another was a guy who constantly changed his mind back.

            Then there was a guy who was always late on his invoices.

            Then there was a company featured on Dragon's Den who loved to shout at me on the phone when they were stressed. Even though the problems had nothing to do with me (they were illegally trying to invoice a major company and I wouldn't help)

            All were dropped as clients.

            Or in the words of an immortal action coach I once dealt with:

            They were deselected.
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  • Profile picture of the author FormerWageSlave
    This has never been an issue when I told them I work out of my home office. Many consultants do this. And I also don't position myself as a "web guy." That may help.

    Is this a challenge for some? Do your potential clients really have an issue with this?
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    grrr...

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    • Profile picture of the author Morgan Westerman
      Originally Posted by FormerWageSlave View Post

      Is this a challenge for some? Do your potential clients really have an issue with this?
      no. they're sometimes surprised when i tell them i DO have an office.
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    • Profile picture of the author Steve Peters Benn
      Originally Posted by FormerWageSlave View Post

      This has never been an issue when I told them I work out of my home office. Many consultants do this. And I also don't position myself as a "web guy." That may help.

      Is this a challenge for some? Do your potential clients really have an issue with this?
      It's something that has come up in the past for me, many years ago. I could answer yes - but it was what was behind the question that really interested me.

      Once I learned to control that "inner conversation" / unspoken objection better, I didn't really have a problem here...

      A lot of people do have this issue though, and it's because of unmet objections, bad past experience etc.
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  • Profile picture of the author dustydesign
    I agree with Tiduslite8 as posted above. I'd let the quality of my work and excellent customer service speak for itself.
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    If "making money" is a goal, consider changing it to "making a living while contributing to society"

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  • Profile picture of the author eddiejames
    Alright - I'll be honest, after much persuasion - Steve has asked me to come on here and write a little bit of a post on a dilemma I'm facing at the moment. You'll see from my post history I don't really post much on Warrior Forum as I'm very underground. This is something I've always strongly believed and that is:

    *It is important to separate work and home life. Running any kind of business is generally very hard work (at least to start off with) and you need to be able to at least forget about it somewhat at evenings and weekends*

    Hold that thought, I'll come back to it in a moment....

    Firstly - I want to have a little rant and address all of these people saying they work from home to save money or reduce overheads. There is nothing wrong working from home, (Heck, Steve does and I do some days - and I myself used to full time).

    HOWEVER:

    Please DO NOT use 'it will lower overheads for my clients' as the 100% excuse if you're doing offline consulting. This is total BS and really falls into the 'poverty mindset' category. Basically meaning 'i'm undercharging my offline clients, so I can barley scrape by earning a living and can't afford spending a few hundred a month on an office space'.

    Don't get me wrong, if you're just starting out or if you're trying to quit working full time - I totally get that you have to keep overheads down.

    However, if you are working full time providing internet marketing services or offline consulting to people - then you really need to consider having a basecamp and the money you earn should EASILY cover the costs. The monthly rent of a small office shouldn't really be an issue for you - unless you actually WANT to work from home as thats the lifestyle choice you've gone for.

    (Hell, when I moved to Manchester in the summer - I went for an office 4 times the size of the last one and haven't taken on any more staff - I feel its that important).

    So going back to what I said earlier, if you take work and home life seriously - it can be tremendously beneficial to have an office to switch yourself into 'work mood'.

    Personally, even before I was earning a full time living - I managed to get a small shared office (like a hot desk facility) as I identified this really early on.

    Since then I've been in a number of offices, and I don't really treat them like a conventional place of work - where everythings a bit dull and boring. I try and make them more like homes, without a bed. So I have a desk, but also inspiring decorations and general 'cool stuff' I guess. This keeps me happy, keeps staff happy and also anyone who comes to visit (I often have friends just pop in during the day to hang out - can be counter-productive, but its one of the benefits of what we do).

    Which brings me to my own personal current dilemma.

    I'm currently in the process of starting a new business, which is VERY VERY different to the stuff we do at the moment which is largely online.

    It will involve meeting A LOT more clients face to face and also sometimes small teams of people.

    My concern is, that our office is a little too informal to have these guys to for a meeting - they may walk in and either mistake it for a work at home flat, or even just generally not really 'get it'.

    So my options are:

    1) Have meetings in Starbucks downstairs (thats like what I used to often do with Steve in a different cafe as he said before)

    2) Hire meeting rooms in a near by *boring* 80's business style office centre. Where they rent them by the hour. Convenient that its only next door, but they want to bill us for all sorts of extras on top of the hourly meeting room rental fee - including basic stuff like internet - which I don't really agree with.

    3) Bring them into our weird and wonderful world. Where the office matches the brand and personality of my existing business - but won't fit in with the ethos of the new one - running the risk of looking a little unprofessional at worst - or a definite eccentric at best.

    Anyway - that was a pretty long post! Be interesting to hear what you guys suggest!
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    Regards,

    James (or Eddie)

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  • Profile picture of the author Tim Hoogasian
    As many have stated above, it's about a mindset wondering if you are "stable".
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