Paid Reviews: Think wisely grasshopper berfore..

43 replies
Paying for reviews from 3rd party services.

Since I stared doing Google places optimization for small businesses I haven't really had to worry about reviews in regards to getting my clients places listings ranked in the very top positions on Google.

I'm not talking about ranking at page one D,E,F and so forth. All my clients listings rank page one A,B, and or C.

I really only consider getting reviews to build engagement from existing customers and for that factor alone I've started looking into the reviews more closely.

Here's what I have found which doesn't shock me one bit.

We all know there are services that will do reviews for you on many 3rd party sites like yelp, kudzu, and so forth. Great!

Not so great!

What happens is you pay for 20 reviews lets as for example.

The service sends the jobs to it users. Lets user MikeB as an example.

MikeB gets a project to do a review for a Dallas Roofer, a New York Deli, and a Los Angeles Plastic surgeon.

MikeB posts his reviews and he's done with his project. Guess what happens now?

MikeB has a really FAST airplane and he's rich too. He traveled from his Dallas home to New York for lunch at his favorite deli and then catches another flight to have his nose done in Los Angeles. All in the same day!

The point I'm making is that on most of these sites including Google you can see ALL the reviews made by a user.

Here's just one as an example. His name is John, and he does get around.

Google Maps

John is a google user account and he left over 20 reviews all on the same date! John gets around to, he visited businesses from all over the country all on the same day!

This is what happens when people pay for reviews so guys unless you want to actually damage your clients reputations go ahead and buy reviews.
#paid #reviews #short #sighted #stupidity
  • Profile picture of the author LiquidSeo
    Russ,

    LOL - crazy how many reviews this guy did in one day. Not too bright, would hate to be his client.

    Brian

    Originally Posted by Rus Sells View Post

    Since I stared doing Google places optimization for small businesses I haven't really had to worry about reviews in regards to getting my clients places listings ranked in the very top positions on Google.

    I'm not talking about ranking at page one D,E,F and so forth. All my clients listings rank page one A,B, and or C.

    I really only consider getting reviews to build engagement from existing customers and for that factor alone I've started looking into the reviews more closely.

    Here's what I have found which doesn't shock me one bit.

    We all know there are services that will do reviews for you on many 3rd party sites like yelp, kudzu, and so forth. Great!

    Not so great!

    What happens is you pay for 20 reviews lets as for example.

    The service sends the jobs to it users. Lets user MikeB as an example.

    MikeB gets a project to do a review for a Dallas Roofer, a New York Deli, and a Los Angeles Plastic surgeon.

    MikeB posts his reviews and he's done with his project. Guess what happens now?

    MikeB has a really FAST airplane and he's rich too. He traveled from his Dallas home to New York for lunch at his favorite deli and then catches another flight to have his nose done in Los Angeles. All in the same day!

    The point I'm making is that on most of these sites including Google you can see ALL the reviews made by a user.

    Here's just one as an example. His name is John, and he does get around.

    Google Maps

    John is a google user account and he left over 20 reviews all on the same date! John gets around to, he visited businesses from all over the country all on the same day!

    This is what happens when people pay for reviews so guys unless you want to actually damage your clients reputations go ahead and buy reviews.
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  • He must get killer frequent flyer miles.
    Signature
    Marketing is not a battle of products. It is a battle of perceptions.
    - Jack Trout
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    • Profile picture of the author ferriswannabe
      I think if your gonna go the paid review route, your the one who needs to control just buying one gig from one provider.

      The typical fiverr person does three reviews, right? ( used once, long time ago )have then do one for google, one for yelp, one for whoever else.

      So just hire several of these and but hire over a period of time in order to spread them out.

      I think though, you just have to push your client to get those reviews themselves. As part of your service or as an upgrade implement some sort review system to get these. The clients can be offered a coupon or similar for leaving the review.



      Good Luck.
      Signature

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      • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
        No, you don't want to buy them this is what I am saying.

        They are not going to create brand new review account for each new gig. They will simply log into existing ones and leave the review. The next customer that comes along who's business is in different state won't matter to them, they'll just use the same review account over and over again.

        Originally Posted by ferriswannabe View Post

        I think if your gonna go the paid review route, your the one who needs to control just buying one gig from one provider.

        The typical fiverr person does three reviews, right? ( used once, long time ago )have then do one for google, one for yelp, one for whoever else.

        So just hire several of these and but hire over a period of time in order to spread them out.

        I think though, you just have to push your client to get those reviews themselves. As part of your service or as an upgrade implement some sort review system to get these. The clients can be offered a coupon or similar for leaving the review.



        Good Luck.
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        • Profile picture of the author vipervin
          Originally Posted by Rus Sells View Post

          No, you don't want to buy them this is what I am saying.

          They are not going to create brand new review account for each new gig. They will simply log into existing ones and leave the review. The next customer that comes along who's business is in different state won't matter to them, they'll just use the same review account over and over again.
          Depends on who your provider is.

          I've ordered 20+ reviews all created on unique accounts for the same city the business is located in.

          Obviously natural reviews are best, but Yelp is still notorious for filtering out legitimate reviews.
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          • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
            Sure, I'm not saying one can't pay for reviews if done correctly but let me enlighten you just a little about something.

            See, with the latest Panda stuff what we need to now realize is that Google applying machine learning to its algo.

            Once Google starts applying statistical machine learning to examine reviews, (if they haven't already) they'll learn very fast to determine whats real and whats fake. Even if your paid reviews come from accounts as you mentioned before.


            Originally Posted by vipervin View Post

            Depends on who your provider is.

            I've ordered 20+ reviews all created on unique accounts for the same city the business is located in.

            Obviously natural reviews are best, but Yelp is still notorious for filtering out legitimate reviews.
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        • Profile picture of the author k60mall
          Hi Rus

          The reason I mentioned our software is because you seemed to be tarring everyone with the same brush over at Fiverr. You said they don't create new accounts to post reviews so you opened the door for my comment about our software that posts reviews from the same state and are replaced each month.

          There are plenty of people here who use reviews to get maps listings ranked so your comment about asking previous customers to leave reviews on google just won't hack it when it comes to ranking maps listings.

          They may fill in a review card at a restaurant but asking them to first created a google/Yelp account, confirm the email then log in and leave a review is too much for most people and if you are relying on this for reviews you will be waiting a long time to get your maps listing ranked.

          I do agree with your comment that using the same account to post hundreds of reviews from all over the country doesn't help with the social aspect but they do help with rankings.

          Just my 2c worth anyway.

          Keith

          Originally Posted by Rus Sells View Post

          No, you don't want to buy them this is what I am saying.

          They are not going to create brand new review account for each new gig. They will simply log into existing ones and leave the review. The next customer that comes along who's business is in different state won't matter to them, they'll just use the same review account over and over again.
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          • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
            Ken,

            Its other posters who've mentioned Fiverr not I.

            I merely pointed out that I noticed it was Google users and not Fiverr or LBL, or any service provider did I?

            My post isn't about ranking maps, its about fake reviews and the folly of paying for them via some services.

            Why isn't it about ranking?

            Because one does not need reviews to rank a places listing, so then it must be about something else and that's reputation management. Its about creating a perception that says, "Hey! Become our customer because we have tons of great reviews!"

            You and I both know that paying for reviews isn't "JUST" about rankings, its also about creating a false perception to users who are trying to make informed decisions about choosing which business to patron. If we think it isn't then we ourselves are fools.

            For those of us who know SEO, know Places, of course we know that reviews can have an impact on rankings, but the average business owner most likely does not know this. Yet many business owners do buy reviews for the express purpose of increasing the perception that they have many happy customers. The reason why is quite obvious.

            We also know that people will take the time to register on Yelp or Google or wherever to leave a negative review much quicker then they would to leave a positive review. That makes sense and the reason why is because they have a good reason to do so based on their experience with the business they used.

            Why aren't just as motivated to leave a good review versus a bad review?

            I suspect it has to do with the users experience. Personally I would not be motivated to leave a positive review if my experience was merely one that I expected.

            Who's going to take the time to create a Google account or Yelp or an account wherever to leave a positive review about a business who delivered something they are in business for? Not I! But should my experience go beyond that, and blow me away, and make me say, Wow I did not expect this level of service or whatever. Then I am more likely to be just as motivated to praise the business through a review as I would be in order to communicate my negative experience.

            This is where I think businesses are missing it.

            For example. I give my kids chores to do, things that are their duties to perform each week. In exchange they get an allowance, so they are remunerated for performing their chores.

            After completing the chores should they come to me and expect praise or something more then the agreed upon pay they won't get it. They agreed to do the work in exchange for the pay.

            Now should they go beyond what I expect without being asked they have exceeded my expectations and are worthy of praise, or extra pay, or maybe an extension on their curfew.

            This isn't what most small businesses are doing, they just go through the actions but they aren't finding ways to provide the "extra" that their customers aren't expecting. This is why asking them to create an account somewhere, confirm the the account and then leave review is to much to ask. I wouldn't do it unless my experience was beyond what I expected, would you?

            However!

            When the business goes above and beyond what is expected they create fans, and fans WILL go and create an account, confirm it, and leave a review if asked.

            So the business owners that get it aren't the ones paying for reviews.

            Its up to us to show them what they need to do to motivate their customers to leave reviews without bribing them or offering some incentive, that is if we ourselves know. Those who read this, that offer SEO and Places, now you know so you have no excuse. = )

            Let me convey an example of going beyond the norm of whats expected out of my own experience as a roofing contractor.

            I figured out after some time that one of the MAJOR decisions people were making in choosing a contract was how the contractor handled protecting the property during construction and post construction clean up.

            When I realized that this was a major deciding factor I started going the extra mile. I had my guys tarp complete sides of the home and extended the tarps down over landscaping etc. Something none of my direct competitors were doing. After the job was complete it was customary to just sweep or use a blower to clean sidewalks and driveways, so I had my crews carry a power washer. Every job when completed got a power washing of all sidewalks, walkways, and driveway down the the street.

            If my guys trampled some of the plants we didn't just give them a credit off their bill, or tell them go buy a replacement plant and give us the receipt and we'll knock that off the bill. No, we found out exactly what type of plant it was, dragged our asses down to the local nursery and bought that plant and then with the home owners help we replaced it for them.

            The effect was simply amazing! We completely exceeded our clients expectations and they rewarded us way more then we did them by referring us to every one they knew who needed a new roof. They became fans.

            Also...

            At first my crews didn't like the idea of having to power wash and do so much tarping but...that had another unexpected result too. When they realized that they were not getting called back to do a second clean up they understood instantly why my change in policy was a great idea. Now the crews started going beyond what was expected as well.

            So with all that said, we have moved from fake reviews to exposing why business owners either end up paying for fake reviews or just make the fake reviews themselves.

            As another example, Starbucks! People pay insane amounts of money for a Starbucks coffee, but why? Because a major factor in their success is revealed right in their corporate mission statement.

            "Develop enthusiastically satisfied customers all of the time"

            Every one they hire starting from management down to the barista's must understand and live by this mission statement. It is a huge factor in Starbucks success.

            So, if your reading this and your in the Offline business providing SEO and Google Places and your client isn't able to get customers to leave positive reviews then sit down with your client and come up with ideas to go beyond what's expected when a person does business with them.



            Originally Posted by k60mall View Post

            Hi Rus

            The reason I mentioned our software is because you seemed to be tarring everyone with the same brush over at Fiverr. You said they don't create new accounts to post reviews so you opened the door for my comment about our software that posts reviews from the same state and are replaced each month.

            There are plenty of people here who use reviews to get maps listings ranked so your comment about asking previous customers to leave reviews on google just won't hack it when it comes to ranking maps listings.

            They may fill in a review card at a restaurant but asking them to first created a google/Yelp account, confirm the email then log in and leave a review is too much for most people and if you are relying on this for reviews you will be waiting a long time to get your maps listing ranked.

            I do agree with your comment that using the same account to post hundreds of reviews from all over the country doesn't help with the social aspect but they do help with rankings.

            Just my 2c worth anyway.

            Keith
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      • Profile picture of the author Winter!
        Originally Posted by ferriswannabe View Post

        I think if your gonna go the paid review route, your the one who needs to control just buying one gig from one provider.
        I think Russ is saying that paying for reviews is bad, bad, BAD. Getting "organic" reviews is the only way to go.

        Winter!
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        • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
          ding ding ding Winter gets the prize today! lol

          The thing is its only a matter of time before Google hammers these fake reviews and you've lost social reputation.

          Buying reviews is like building a house on sand.

          Originally Posted by Winter! View Post

          I think Russ is saying that paying for reviews is bad, bad, BAD. Getting "organic" reviews is the only way to go.

          Winter!
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        • Profile picture of the author ferriswannabe
          Rus, I see what your mean. The workaround would to have gmail accounts setup that could be forwarded to review providers and then after review is done, go and change password so no more reviews get done under that account.

          And I didn't read that last line, the first time. Your right, paid reviews are not the way to go, and it will always be better and safer to get them naturally.

          Nothing makes a business look worse then those "spammy-looking reviews"
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  • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
    Brain, they are rampant all over the place! Judy's book, you name it. They do not police the reviews very well at all.

    I'm just going to set up a method for my clients to ask for reviews and give them some options to review at Google and 2 or 3 third party sites. Give the client instructions on how to set up the account at the site of their choosing and let the reviews fall where they may.

    I don't really need reviews to get listings ranked so it not about that. Its more about the social aspect and engagement.
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  • Profile picture of the author MichaelHiles
    Oh Rus, you negative nelly spoil sport. I mean... how dare you put the damper on those who are out there selling their reviews on Fiverr. I bet at least 5 WSO sales dropped because of your for reals comments and all.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
    OH! Just wait until the client goes to their Google Places page and starts reading the reviews then clicks the reviewers user name and sees that BillB gets around.
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  • Profile picture of the author flyinghammers
    This is exactly why as a consumer I don't make any buying decisions based upon Google Places. I prefer Yelp. I know there are fake reviews on Yelp as well, but I don't think it is quite as rampant. The Yelp community is vigorous in reporting fake reviews and they have a review filter algorithm in place.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
    Ironically I found this article right after posting about this thread.

    One of the great things about the internet is the fact that everyday people can share what they know with the entire world, so if they've had a particularly good or bad experience with a business or product, they can notify everyone via customer review websites. The flip-side of that, however, is that business owners can plant fake reviews on those same sites, that either praise their own business or slam their competition. Well, confused consumers can now take heart - researchers from Cornell University have developed software that is able to identify phony reviews with close to 90 percent accuracy.
    The Cornell team asked a group of people to deliberately write a total of 400 fraudulent positive reviews of 20 Chicago hotels. These were combined with the same number of genuinely positive reviews, then submitted to a panel of three human judges. When asked to identify which reviews were spam, the judges scored no better than if they had randomly guessed.
    According to Myle Ott, a Cornell doctoral candidate in computer science, humans are affected by a "truth bias," in which they assume that everything they read is true unless presented with evidence to the contrary. When that happens, they then overcompensate, and assume that more of what they read is untrue than is actually the case.
    After the human trials, the researchers then applied statistical machine learning algorithms to the reviews, to see what was unique to both the genuine and fraudulent examples. It turns out that the fake ones used a lot of scene-setting language, such as "vacation," "business" or "my husband." The genuine ones, on the other hand, tended to focus more on specific words relating to the hotel, such as "bathroom," "check-in" and "price."
    The two groups of writers also differed in their use of specific keywords and punctuation, and how much they referred to themselves. As had already been found in other studies of imaginative versus informative writing, it was additionally determined that the spam reviews contained more verbs, while the honest ones contained more nouns.
    Based on a subset of the 800 reviews, the team created a fake-review-detecting algorithm. When used in a way that combined the analysis of keywords and word combinations, that algorithm was able to identify deceptive reviews in the entire database with 89.8 percent accuracy.
    So far, the software is only useful for processing hotel reviews, and Chicago hotel reviews at that. The Cornell team is hoping, however, that similar algorithms could be developed for reviews of a wider range of goods and services.
    "Ultimately, cutting down on deception helps everyone," said Ott. "Customers need to be able to trust the reviews they read, and sellers need feedback on how best to improve their services."


    Source:Software picks out fake online reviews
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  • Profile picture of the author krzysiek
    I didn't read the whole thread, but Russ has a good point that I fully intend on using when the time comes that I have my first client. Provide your client (who then provides their clients) with information on where/how to leave a review. You can give them X amount of these "instructions" per month, so as not to make it suspicious. Then let the reviews fall where they fall. Or, you can alternatively make specific instructions per each card, and that way you can literally control where the clients will leave the reviews.

    This is the best way, as opposed to paid reviews. It's FREE, and it's legit!

    Interesting that you get your Google Places ranked without reviews, though. I am looking at doing Google Places for a client here in the area, I would be happy to be able to rank it without reviews.

    I don't understand how you can dominate the A B and C spot in Google though? Are you making duplicate listings?
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    • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
      No, I do not make duplicate listings. My listings either rank in A,B, or C. They usually jumble around between those spots. Once week A, three weeks later B. But they all stay there.

      How I do it without reviews? That's a secret I'm about to release very soon. Completely white hat method.

      Russ

      Originally Posted by krzysiek View Post

      I didn't read the whole thread, but Russ has a good point that I fully intend on using when the time comes that I have my first client. Provide your client (who then provides their clients) with information on where/how to leave a review. You can give them X amount of these "instructions" per month, so as not to make it suspicious. Then let the reviews fall where they fall. Or, you can alternatively make specific instructions per each card, and that way you can literally control where the clients will leave the reviews.

      This is the best way, as opposed to paid reviews. It's FREE, and it's legit!

      Interesting that you get your Google Places ranked without reviews, though. I am looking at doing Google Places for a client here in the area, I would be happy to be able to rank it without reviews.

      I don't understand how you can dominate the A B and C spot in Google though? Are you making duplicate listings?
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  • Profile picture of the author Dr Dan
    So you guys are saying that paying for reviews is bad?

    lol... jk

    I see way too many of this going around and being taught in alot of IM products as well.

    The funniest ones are the videos that you recognize from fiverr providers pretending to be someone that ha used their product or service.
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    • Profile picture of the author jimbo13
      Rus

      This thread is AWESOME!!!!!!

      I wouldn't hesitate to recommend your others. Keep up the good work!!!!!!

      Dan - England
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    • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
      come on bro, lets have a little thread etiquette please!

      Originally Posted by k60mall View Post

      You could always use Local Business Listing Robot to post your reviews that come from the same state.
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      • Profile picture of the author Allworth
        Yelp is notorious for filtering thousands of honest and genuine reviews posted by real people. When a person is told that a legitimate review has been "filtered" they get very upset. Yelp deserves the terrible reputation they have with real people and businesses.

        Yelp is all about pandering to their group of "elite" Yelpers. It's an elitist power structure much like how Wikipedia works and it's prone to corruption.

        Leaving a real review takes a heck of a lot of time and effort. If Google starts following Yelp in using arbitray and draconian so-called algorithms then this will be yet another black eye for Google - a company that is currently in a lot of trouble with the FTC right now for various anti-competitive behaviors.

        Of course we should never leave fake reviews but the problem is when honest reviews get filtered and labeled fake. No computer program can accurately judge whether a review is real or not.

        Since reviews are essentially FREE content -- and Google has made billions of dollars on the concept of free content -- reviews are a double-edged sword. If they don't like reviews or the fact that people have freedom of speech and are entitled to their opinions they should get out of the review business completely.
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  • Profile picture of the author krzysiek
    Keith,

    Quick question: Out of curiousity, does your service allow the buyer to give the content of the review?

    Do you support Australian states?
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  • Profile picture of the author k60mall
    HI Krzysiek

    Not sure what the first part of your question means but you can post reviews that either your client gives you (which I think you should) or as some people do write reviews for thir clients.

    It's up to you what you think is ethical, our software only posts what you put in there.

    Yes we do support Australia.

    Keith
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  • Profile picture of the author krzysiek
    Great, thanks for the response. Not sure if I will need such a service (Rus says he can rank in really low comp. areas without citations/reviews I think, so I will try to do the same) but it might come in handy!

    Cheers
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    • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
      Where did I say, "really low comp."

      I happen to rank listings in the legal industry and construction, those are not low competitive industries. = )

      Russ

      Originally Posted by krzysiek View Post

      Great, thanks for the response. Not sure if I will need such a service (Rus says he can rank in really low comp. areas without citations/reviews I think, so I will try to do the same) but it might come in handy!

      Cheers
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  • Profile picture of the author krzysiek
    Brilliant.
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  • Profile picture of the author YseUp
    What do you guys think of collecting real reviews and uploading them yourself? Or paying someone with Google accounts in the right geographical location to do that?

    I guess it's borderline... but people are just not as inclined to write positive reviews.
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  • Profile picture of the author BarbaraG
    I have not spent a lot of time reading posts on the Warrior Forum because I can get consumed by them, and time gets away from me. However, the time I spent this morning reading this thread was well worth it! Thank you, Rus, for these insights. Your comments about going above and beyond apply to every aspect of life, and educating a business owner about ways to do this will definitely improve the experience for the owner, for the customer and for us as consultants. It's a win-win-win. Thanks for sharing this.
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  • Profile picture of the author krzysiek
    Haha, even better! I was assuming they were low comp., my bad!

    When would you be releasing your WSO on getting top rankings for Google Places? I am more interested in what you offer as you have real world experience. I find with previous WSO's, not all of them had real experience.

    PS: Was in reference to Rus' post, seems a few people snuk in before I posted!
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    • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
      I haven't decided to release it as a WSO as of now.

      I can say that its so simple, and its staring every one right in the face people will be like WTF I should have known, but I also throw an additional twist on it as well.

      Russ

      Originally Posted by krzysiek View Post

      Haha, even better! I was assuming they were low comp., my bad!

      When would you be releasing your WSO on getting top rankings for Google Places? I am more interested in what you offer as you have real world experience. I find with previous WSO's, not all of them had real experience.

      PS: Was in reference to Rus' post, seems a few people snuk in before I posted!
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  • Profile picture of the author MichaelHiles
    The FTC regulates false testimonials in advertising.

    Faking a customer review is just about at the same level in both ethics and legality.

    Service providers that create false reviews for pay are unethical. Period.
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    • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
      Oh yeah! I didn't even touch on that! Thanks for pointing that out Michael!

      Originally Posted by MichaelHiles View Post

      The FTC regulates false testimonials in advertising.

      Faking a customer review is just about at the same level in both ethics and legality.

      Service providers that create false reviews for pay are unethical. Period.
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      • Profile picture of the author MichaelHiles
        Originally Posted by Rus Sells View Post

        Oh yeah! I didn't even touch on that! Thanks for pointing that out Michael!
        Yep. I don't care whose toes it steps on. It's wrong and it's unethical. It should also be scrutinized by everyone from the FTC to Google itself... and I am no lover of government intervention. But this is the exact sort of stuff that the government is there to do... so I have no qualms whatsoever about cracking down on outright dishonest lies that are sold on the open market by liars who are willing to sell their soul for a buck. That open dishonesty is a huge red flag for anyone in business to beware of someone willing to commit a crime for money. It's fraudulent.

        It's sort of like smoking cigarettes in the 1950s. Everybody did it. It was socially acceptable. Doctors sold their testimonials to the tobacco companies even though smoking had no positive health benefits. But in the end, no paid testimonial could overcome CANCER.

        If your business is crap, no amount of false testimonials will overcome your real reputation in the marketplace. It might hide it for a while. You might be able to kick the can down the road of public awareness of your crappy business practices. But in the end, CANCER is CANCER and you'll die from it - regardless of what the unethical doctor was paid to say in an ad.
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    • Profile picture of the author k60mall
      I totally agree that you should never post false reviews because if your product or service is good you will get lots of reviews/thank you letters from your customers.

      Originally Posted by MichaelHiles View Post

      The FTC regulates false testimonials in advertising.

      Faking a customer review is just about at the same level in both ethics and legality.

      Service providers that create false reviews for pay are unethical. Period.
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      • Profile picture of the author hansgruber75
        Hey folks-

        I've looked at lblrobot for a while now, but never have bit the bullet. I'm an SEO/Local consultant specializing in the medical (hint- teeth) vertical. Most of my clients haven't- nor will- train their staff to ask for their patients to go online and post reviews.

        As most of you know, just last week that Google dropped the hammer on 3rd party reviews. In my industry, a company that rhymes with "remand course" just got annihilated. ***I know- I sound like a fool with my code talk... it's just that I don't like to index certain keywords ***

        Anyway- my clients have written testimonials from patients. Could I use lblrobot to post those to Google Places?

        Just recently, I also implemented a "review us" widget for one of my clients' website, which is a Wordpress site.

        I created a survey form in which the client sends a link to their patients after their appointment. The patients fill out the survey and it posts to the website (after approval).

        I'd love for these to go to GP's.

        Does lblrobot offer this?
        How legit is lbl? How do I know that these reviews won't get them in trouble w/ Google????
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        • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
          Lets not hijack this thread and turn it into a product review conversation pleas.

          Originally Posted by hansgruber75 View Post

          Hey folks-

          I've looked at lblrobot for a while now, but never have bit the bullet. I'm an SEO/Local consultant specializing in the medical (hint- teeth) vertical. Most of my clients haven't- nor will- train their staff to ask for their patients to go online and post reviews.

          As most of you know, just last week that Google dropped the hammer on 3rd party reviews. In my industry, a company that rhymes with "remand course" just got annihilated. ***I know- I sound like a fool with my code talk... it's just that I don't like to index certain keywords ***

          Anyway- my clients have written testimonials from patients. Could I use lblrobot to post those to Google Places?

          Just recently, I also implemented a "review us" widget for one of my clients' website, which is a Wordpress site.

          I created a survey form in which the client sends a link to their patients after their appointment. The patients fill out the survey and it posts to the website (after approval).

          I'd love for these to go to GP's.

          Does lblrobot offer this?
          How legit is lbl? How do I know that these reviews won't get them in trouble w/ Google????
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[4574363].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author great2bme
          "Just recently, I also implemented a "review us" widget for one of my clients' website, which is a Wordpress site.

          I created a survey form in which the client sends a link to their patients after their appointment. The patients fill out the survey and it posts to the website (after approval)."
          Which widget are you using?
          Are clients actually placing reviews?


          I know I'd like to achieve the same feedback/review effect for my friends in the medical profession.

          Thanks for your input,
          BJ
          Signature

          Go Fun Rewards lifestyle dollar customers at: Go Fun Places customers at http://RewardsControl.com/

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          • Profile picture of the author DollyCatherine
            Many of us here have been involved with online sales and marketing for a while.Moving to the offline world, many of the same principles apply, but it's not always clear how to leverage them.
            One thing where most offline shops are really missing the boat is in building a email list.
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            • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
              Hey Dolly,

              Yes your right but that's not the topic of this thread, we are talking about those who think its smart business practice to buy fake reviews for Google Places.

              Originally Posted by DollyCatherine View Post

              Many of us here have been involved with online sales and marketing for a while.Moving to the offline world, many of the same principles apply, but it's not always clear how to leverage them.
              One thing where most offline shops are really missing the boat is in building a email list.
              {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[4761121].message }}

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