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I haven't started many threads here, actually this would be number 2 and that certainly qualifies as "not many" I suppose.

On many, many, many of the threads and posts there's talk about getting appointments, followups, offering free reports, and just about every other aspect of how to get in front of a prospect. Theres tons of thoughts and suggestions about how to present our products and services. But for all of that, there's virtually nothing about asking for the order, when you are there!

To have this much discussion about selling, without talking about one call closing seems very strange to me. Selling is a process. The end of the process is called "sold" and you get there by asking for the order.

Most people that I've worked with over the years, who are professional sales people, are obsessed with keeping and evaluating numbers. One number that always stands out, is their closing ratio. Most sales people will tell you that the greatest majority of their sales are made on the first call. Typically, that number is over 70% and because of that, they feel follow up is a waste of valuable time.

This makes a lot of sense because there is no time when your prospect will know more about your offer than at the point when you are either in his office or on the phone. Let's face facts, once you're out of the office, you and your offer are out of their thoughts.

You spend a lot of time trying to make that appointment. You build a call list of potential prospects, you begin calling, you get rejected countless times, you overcome gatekeepers, you deal with some nice business owners, some nasty business owners, you grab that 9th cup of coffee and you continue until finally, someone on the phone says those great words, "you know, I was just talking to my staff about that....Tuesday at 1 would be great".....that's a LOT of work for a single appointment. But it's just the beginning. By the way, that's when a lot of us get off the phone when the truth is, that's the time to keep going!

Now you prepare for the meeting, prepare some report that perhaps you offered, drive to the meeting, go through all the mental exercise to get ready to deliver a great pitch......you make a presentation, answer all their questions,....overcome their objections......and now after ALL THAT WORK......do you....and let's be honest.....ask for the order?

The truth is that many (because I don't want to make enemies I won't say most) of us do not.

After the reqisite "I have to think it over" even less of us ask, and it's probably not statistically measurable as to how many of us ask beyond that.

After we have done ALL THAT WORK.....I cannot think of a SINGLE reason that we are not entitled to an answer.

Now I am not excluding myself from any of this. I am as guilty of these things as anyone and I need as much help and guidance as anyone. I am not holding myself up as an expert in any manner. It's my sincere hope that we are all here to offer each other help, support, and motivation to be successful in our endeavors.
#call #closing
  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    Well, let's begin with a premise. Most salespeople don't know or do this. From our prospects:

    YES is acceptable.

    NO is acceptable.

    THINK IT OVER is unacceptable.

    The reason why I personally don't talk much about closing is this: that's powerful information. This is what people become clients of mine for. Would you like to become a client? (By the way, the last two sentences I just gave you are a close all by themselves.) I give out lots of tactics on prospecting, which is a huge part of your success in Sales, and doctoring for pain.

    I will, however, give you all a look at a PM I sent to a fellow Warrior at around 5AM this morning. The forum has a character limit on posts, so I'll have to give it to you in two sequential segments. Here it is:

    About your question, whether to present proposals at the end of your first visit, or go back and present at a second appointment:

    "It depends" :rolleyes:

    Let me give you more of the consultative selling process (gawd, there's more--but you'll see that if I tried to dump all of this on you at once, it would be overwhelming...you have to see how the parts work together):

    Every step of the way you want to get commitment from your prospect. These are "If I do this, then you'll do that" agreements. They start off small (remember that little "Let me take a quick minute and tell you why I called, and then you can decide if we should talk further or not?" agreement at the beginning of your prospecting calls?) and work their way up in magnitude to "If I show you exactly how I can solve your pain problem, in the way you wan to be shown, then you'll tell me today whether we're going ahead or not."

    The analogy I've come up with about how this works in practice is that these agreements work the same way climbers tackle Mount Everest. If you haven't read Jon Krakauer's "Into Thin Air"Jon Krakauer's "Into Thin Air" , I recommend you get one from the library or buy a 1 cent paperpack copy (with shipping it'll be a whopping $4.00 grand total). I read it 10 years ago and it's stuck with me...as a matter of fact, I just paused writing this to go see if my local library has it (they do--or I would have bought a copy from Amazon). I'll bet you think climbers of huge peaks like Everest go straight up the mountain, right?

    Wrong. They ascend in stages. If I remember correctly, they do Everest in four camps in "Into Thin Air." So the climbers come up to base camp, which I think is at 18,000 feet. They acclimatize. One of the big problems of climbing big mountains is that the oxygen disappears from the air, and your body starts to die as you ascend. Some people just can't handle this, and get sick. At that point it's life-threatening and they can't continue.

    So to find out how individuals' bodies are going to react, the climbers go up in teams and in stages. They go up to camp one, spend some time there, and come back down to base camp. If anyone gets sick at camp one, that person gets sent back to civilization. Then the team goes up to camp two, which is naturally even higher. They spend some time there to find out who gets sick, and then return to base, and so on. Eventually the remaining team members who didn't get sick can go up to the peak. Note how they're going over the same ground several times, re-confirming what they're doing.

    Now the thing that nearly all the climbers will tell you is this: "Anyone can get to the top of Everest. The hard part is making it back down alive." If you read the book, you'll find out why.

    (stay tuned for Part 2)
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    • Profile picture of the author iamchrisgreen
      Originally Posted by kaniganj View Post

      Well, let's begin with a premise. Most salespeople don't know or do this. From our prospects:

      YES is acceptable.

      NO is acceptable.

      THINK IT OVER is unacceptable.
      100% correct. If you can get your head around that alone, you will massively increase your sales.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    (part 2)

    The analogy is perfect. At each step of the selling process, you must re-assert those "If-Then" agreements. If you can't get these, it's like you didn't acclimatize to Camp Three, got sick and must return to civilization: you won't make the sale.

    So starting at the end of your prospecting call, when you've gotten some pain on the table and they agree to see you, you say: "Let me take a moment to share how these meetings usually go. We'll meet for about an hour. I'll have a lot of questions for you, and I'm sure you'll have questions for me. At the end of about 40 minutes, we should both know whether there's anything I can do to help you or not. If it turns out we're not a fit, that's okay. If we do agree that I can help you, we'll figure out what that looks like then. Does this make sense?"

    and when you meet them in person, you reiterate this same thing: "Thanks for inviting me in." Oh, yes, inviting you in. Who do we invite in? Guests! They're going to treat you better simply by saying this! "I want to take a quick minute and go over what we'll be doing here today. We'll sit down and talk about your business for about an hour. I'll have a lot of questions for you...and I'm sure you'll have questions for me. At the end of our discussion, we'll both know whether or not I can do anything for you; if not, that's all right. Neither of us will be mad at the other. If so, then we'll figure out what that might look like then. Does this make sense?"

    and it's always helpful to ask, "Has anything changed that I need to know about today?" Sometimes, even though you scheduled an hour, they have changed the time available to much less. It's imperative that you know about this prior to starting! There are lots of stories about this happening, and the salesperson wasting all of their time in the first half-hour, and then discovering that Time's Up! and they didn't accomplish anything. Trust me, prospects want to change things all the time and not tell you about it.

    Okay, back to the Everest analogy. This up front contract is one of those agreements that gets you to the next camp. So it depends on how much time they have for you, how much discussion you're able to have, and how completely you end up understanding their world by the end of that first appointment. If you haven't reached the summit, then you'll have to ask for extra time--today or another day. There's no way you can propose anything otherwise.

    Now the creepy thing about climbing Everest is that, up high, the air doesn't support life. That means there's no bacteria in the air to break down dead things...and so the junk and frozen bodies of those who've died there stay there. This is a perfect metaphor for the memory of failed sales attempts that stick in the mind of you and the prospect! (Another reason to ask "Have you tried fixing this before? What happened? Oh look, there's Joey the other sales guy and his failed attempt over there.")

    Keep the Everest analogy in mind as you meet with your prospect. If you know by your process (doctoring for pain, honest sharing by the prospect and their agreement that the problem really does exist, uncovering the true budget etc.) that you've climbed safely to the summit, then you may give a proposal. Otherwise, you'll have to schedule more time to discuss the problem further. Or the sale will die on the mountain.

    You DO want to get them with their enthusiasm and interest at its highest level, so do your best to get their agreement as soon as possible that if you show them your solution, the way that they want to be shown, then they will tell you today whether the project is a Go or not (and present your proposal). I mean, at the appropriate time in the process. Do Not bring this up or say anything like this until AFTER you've done all the other steps.

    Does this make sense? The more you use this, the more natural it will seem to you. I know it seems like there's a lot to remember right now, but it's actually straightforward and after awhile it'll be second nature and you won't even have to think about it much. If you have any questions about these ideas please let me know.
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    • Profile picture of the author Bayo
      Two of the most important skills anyone seriously involved in Offline Marketing consulting can have are QUESTIONING and OBJECTION HANDLING.

      The two skills relate to selling which most people hate doing or aren't that good at. The good news is that you can learn how to sell easily and you get better by doing.

      Bayo
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      • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
        Originally Posted by Bayo View Post

        Two of the most important skills anyone seriously involved in Offline Marketing consulting can have are QUESTIONING and OBJECTION HANDLING.

        The two skills relate to selling which most people hate doing or aren't that good at. The good news is that you can learn how to sell easily and you get better by doing.

        Bayo
        I agree about the Questioning skills. Objection Handling, however, is a feature of the transactional model of selling. If you want to escape from having to overcome objections, check out consultative selling.
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        • Profile picture of the author David Miller
          I see this thread going the way of all the others.....Jason, with all do respect, if I have to conjour up an image of climbing the highest mountain of the face of the earth on every occassion that I go into a sales presentation....no thanks.

          As I read through your post(s) it seems to me that you are going to great lengths to get the prospect to ask for the order. Your points about getting agreement along the way is sales 101, it's the "yes" momentum. Your suggestion that "if I show you how I solve your problem, are you ready to move ahead" (not your exact words) well that's all well and good.

          It's also an easy out when a prospect says, "no, I don't see how it does that" so where does that leave you? It leads you to one of two things:

          1. Well like I said, if you don't think it will, have a nice day, or,
          2. Realize that he just voiced an objection, which brings us back to selling in a manner that you claim is not the way you like to work.

          Again, I would like this thread to focus on closing, not appointment setting, or how to get committments during the way, because in my opinion and experience, the only thing that pays the rent is closing.

          It's a simple process and we all have different ways to get there, and I think it would be beneficial for everyone to understand what to do once we're there.

          Step one: Make sure you set an appointment with and are meeting with the decision maker. Easy to do, just ask.
          Step two: Present you product and show how it can save money or increase profits. There aren't many other reasons a business buys anything.
          Step three: Close the deal!

          Steps one and two have been written about in WF ad nauseum......let's have some discussion about closing.
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      • Profile picture of the author JoshN
        Originally Posted by Bayo View Post

        Two of the most important skills anyone seriously involved in Offline Marketing consulting can have are QUESTIONING and OBJECTION HANDLING.

        The two skills relate to selling which most people hate doing or aren't that good at. The good news is that you can learn how to sell easily and you get better by doing.

        Bayo
        I would expand questioning to understanding which is a little deeper than throwing questions at someone All of which falls under the greater subset of QUALIFYING.

        Being able to qualify a prospect is the biggest difference between green and experienced sales people.

        If the person fits your criteria then you should honestly feel you can add value... From there you're just talking to someone about how you can help their business. This is an easy conversation, and you don't really need to handle objections.

        BTW If you are a nose to the grindstone sort of sales guy and you like the confrontation then know that there are real statistics out there that say that if a person hasn't hung up on you yet they will say yes a large majority of the time after they've said no 6 or more times. (cant find the link right now) The key is just finding new and creative ways to ask for the sale in different ways.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    I see how you could visualize the analogy that way. From my angle, climbing mountains is Fun! Adventurous! Exciting! And Sales IS a very delicate, uncertain thing: one mistake *can* send you tumbling off a cliff. That danger can be part of what makes it fun.

    Also, by rushing to the end, I think you're skipping the budget step, and the personality fit. And that all these steps are in fact *part of the closing process!* My post was all about closing. Consultative selling doesn't use a traditional closing technique. The way it works is that the prospect sells themselves. You don't have to spend a lot of time on this: as soon as you have enough knowledge in each stage, you can move on to the next. The whole process can easily be done in 40 minutes.

    You don't want to end up with buyer's remorse, where they call and cancel the order. You also don't want a bad fit.

    Now you may be a pretty advanced salesperson, but most people are not. They're like I used to be, what I call a "sales zombie": wandering around, doing things by the seat of their pants, not sure why they succeed sometimes and fail others.

    Closing, this way, is about removing objections like price, technical features and delivery issues by uncovering urgent, emotional pain that needs to be solved. The entire process is a lead-up to that. I provided readers with the close:

    "If I show you how we solve your issue, the way you want to be shown, then you agree to tell me TODAY whether you say Yes or No." Think It Overs are unacceptable. If they do that to you, then it's a No because eventually, after a drawn-out process where the prospect hides and shops around to find what you offer at the cheapest price, they'll tell you No anyway.

    They can ask you to leave the room while they discuss your proposal, or give you an answer by 5PM, for example.

    I disagree that getting agreement on issues is the "Yes Yes" approach. THEY are not agreeing with YOU about reasons for buying: YOU are discovering if THEIR reasons for needing change are things that you can do something about. But I completely agree with you about getting the prospect to ask you for the order! That's effective--no price objection, no objections at all. Much easier. So if the price to you is that you must follow a process, and it takes a little longer, so be it. The major cause of failure in Sales is in fact rushing--ask other sales trainers.

    Most salespeople get caught up in trying to wrestle their prospect to the ground making them buy every feature & benefit their product or service provides. I suggest that you find out what your prospect wants to buy, and sell them that portion of what your solution does. Educate them after the sale about every other wonderful thing it does. Comments?
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  • Profile picture of the author flightrisk
    Im a one call closer by profession. If you ask questions and get commitments, knowing that your going to get a "think about it" at the end, then you can go back and talk about the commitments he gave you.

    Its always about price anyway,so on a one call close, you have to give him a reason to say yes, now.

    eg.
    You: sounds like your business could really this, out side of price is there any reason we cant start today?(pre-close)
    Him: no(anything else then your presentation needs work)

    Give price...

    him: I'll think about it(hes prob. fishing for discount anyway)
    You: Thats fine you should think about it, let me ask you when do you think you'll be ready to do this?(releives pressure of him telling you no)
    Him: Next week
    You: Ok great, now you said before that your business needs something like this right?(go over all the commitments he made to you)
    Him: right
    You: Ok are you thinking about having someone else do this or is a little more then what you thought it was going to be?
    him: yeah its price
    You: ok if i can make this affordable could we get started today?
    Him: ok how
    You: if we start this today I can take $XXX off today and you can pay half now and balance on end or make monthly payments of $xxx for 12 months, which would be best for you? (write this on paper for him)
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  • Profile picture of the author David Miller
    Flightrisk, regardless of agreeing or not agreeing with your approach, your post is about CLOSING! Thanks so much for that. It's all about what happens once that curtain is pulled back and it's time to ask for the order.

    I don't disagree with consultative selling in any way. But, when all is said and done, "thinking it over" is a knee jerk reaction from just about anyone when they are asked for a decision.

    I don't know what you sell, but out of curiosity, what percentage of sales happens after the first call?
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    • Profile picture of the author flightrisk
      By definition, one call close is just that. I have one chance for the sale, if they go for it then i make money if they dont go for it that day then I make no money, so 'i'll think about it" i get all the time and I have to work through it.

      Yes that is a normal response when you ask for an order. Same as when you go to a store and the salesman asks you if you need help, you say no and in the same breath say where the DVD's?. Its a knee jerk response. Believe me, alot of people dont know how to handle "i'll think about it".

      The close is the hardest part of selling and is where your sales skills start.

      To answer you question i do get a few people calling me back later but I dont hold my breath
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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
      Originally Posted by David Miller View Post

      Flightrisk, regardless of agreeing or not agreeing with your approach, your post is about CLOSING! Thanks so much for that. It's all about what happens once that curtain is pulled back and it's time to ask for the order.

      I don't disagree with consultative selling in any way. But, when all is said and done, "thinking it over" is a knee jerk reaction from just about anyone when they are asked for a decision.

      I don't know what you sell, but out of curiosity, what percentage of sales happens after the first call?
      Hmm. My prospects go ahead with the order at least 2/3 of the time. I don't give presentations to everyone who contacts me, and I don't experience the price objection often at all. I make sure that the conditions show it's pretty much a sure thing before I demo and do the non-close close.

      Here's an example of a dinky $100 or so direct mail letter project that an accounting firm wanted done. I responded with this proposal (easier for me to link than post the whole thing here--I used the maximum number of characters elance would allow in the field) and became the only invited bidder for a new $3775 project--my price--for a complete referral system with this single communication. No price objection. And this wasn't even in person! What I got in reply was, "Wow! I didn't expect such a detailed response!"

      ADDITION:

      What you tolerate from your prospects is a direct result of your own buying habits. If you shop around for the best deal, get a lot of proposals before deciding, or let other salespeople leave unending voicemails for you, don't be shocked when prospects do these things to you! It's a subconscious thing, we call it "head trash" or unsupportive buying habits.

      If you stand up to them and say, nicely, "Miss Prospect, we agreed that you would give me a firm decision when I was done my presentation. Either a No or a Yes is OK, but we agreed that thinking it over is something that would not happen." If you don't do this, you'll be giving away unpaid consulting.

      ANOTHER THOUGHT:

      If things seem to have stalled, and although the prospect appeared to like everything and hasn't voiced any objections...but the project isn't going forward...ask your your prospect:

      "It seems like you like everything we're talked about. But I feel that this project is stalled. I'm not sure what we should do here. What would you suggest?"

      Their responses will surprise you!
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  • Profile picture of the author David Miller
    If things seem to have stalled, and although the prospect appeared to like everything and hasn't voiced any objections...but the project isn't going forward...ask your your prospect:

    "It seems like you like everything we're talked about. But I feel that this project is stalled. I'm not sure what we should do here. What would you suggest?"


    That's a great tactic....well worth adding to anyone's bag-0-tricks
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    The big lesson in life, baby, is never be scared of anyone or anything.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
      Let's go with one more, which I've shared in other posts.

      If the prospect says, "That's too much!" you can respond politely with, "Compared to what?" This deals with that knee-jerk reaction we've been talking about.

      Also (this comes from something I wrote on uncovering the prospect's true budget), you can say, "Mister Prospect, could you share with me, off the record and in round figures, what kind of a budget you've set aside for this project?" That phrasing will help them 'open up.'

      If their budget isn't a fit, but you want to keep trying, say: "That *is* a lower budget than our normal investment. But I'll tell you what. There is a way we can work with your budget as it stands. What features do you want to cut?"

      Almost always, they'll jump! Or, you'll arrive at some reduced scope that fits what they can afford to pay right now. You can always sell add-ons later.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    Do you, dear reader, have a question about a specific of closing you'd like to ask?
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    • Profile picture of the author IMguy123
      A very good thread that I mistakenly missed before.
      thanks experts
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      • Profile picture of the author iAmNameLess
        Originally Posted by IMguy123 View Post

        A very good thread that I mistakenly missed before.
        thanks experts
        Yeah.. I was wondering how I missed this? Then I saw David say it's only his second thread, which I remember about 2 or 3 thread bringing up some of the BS of other people, then I looked at the date the thread was created LOL.

        Anyway, one call closing, absolutely is great. There are people that like to set appointments, I don't like wasting time, I want an answer right then and there!

        David, I would have to agree with your numbers as well... 70% of my sales are made on the first call as well.
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        • Profile picture of the author flightrisk
          Originally Posted by iAmNameLess View Post


          Anyway, one call closing, absolutely is great. There are people that like to set appointments, I don't like wasting time, I want an answer right then and there!
          I had this today...He would like to meet with me, I told him that we could cover all questions that he had over the phone and coming out to his office really isn't necessary, but we could schedule a phone call later to go over any questions he might think of if he wanted.

          I felt a little uneasy and I think he did as well. He's going to call me later. Hopefully I didnt miss this one.

          How do you go about this if they insist?
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          • Profile picture of the author iAmNameLess
            Originally Posted by flightrisk View Post

            How do you go about this if they insist?
            $100 appointment fee for taking up my time and making me travel. The fee is waved if they sign up in the meeting. Most people will be perfectly fine with just a phone call after hearing that. Can you come by my office today to discuss this? Sorry sir, we actually have a $100 appointment fee if it requires travel but we can take care of any questions right now or set up a phone meeting later in the day.. which works best for you?

            Other than that, I don't really run into the issue.. I do a lot in my local area, but even more outside of here and in other markets, so it isn't even an option.
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            • Profile picture of the author Just Jarius
              Originally Posted by iAmNameLess View Post

              $100 appointment fee for taking up my time and making me travel. The fee is waved if they sign up in the meeting. Most people will be perfectly fine with just a phone call after hearing that. Can you come by my office today to discuss this? Sorry sir, we actually have a $100 appointment fee if it requires travel but we can take care of any questions right now or set up a phone meeting later in the day.. which works best for you?

              Other than that, I don't really run into the issue.. I do a lot in my local area, but even more outside of here and in other markets, so it isn't even an option.
              Appointment fee huh? That's a good a good one, I like it!
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              • Profile picture of the author Adwizard
                Closing is certainly an art... If that were not so, then all salespeople would be doing it. The fact of the matter is that people are great at giving presentations.... just not so great at asking for the sale. This is why everyone needs to remember the acronym ABC: Always Be Closing!!!

                If you find asking for the sale very difficult, then just start assuming it. Pull out a contract and start filling it out or if over the phone just use a simple line like stated above... we need a check number to get started.

                I have trained lots of salespeople doing B2B sales while building a very large direct mail company. I seen first hand several people very successful with one call closes, when emotions are the highest they will ever be and the facts are more clear than they will ever be. I have also seen even more people who were afraid to close at all. They could give a great presentation but it pained them to ask for the business or more specifically the check! Most sales situations the one call close is perfectly fine for, and the most successful people will use it every time. You really need to decide: DO YOU WANT THE MONEY!!!

                Great thread David
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  • Profile picture of the author ericbryant
    I agree, it is a process. From time to time I get a one call close, just because everything lines up, it's fun, but not really that big of a deal in the big picture if you factor in how infrequently it happens.
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    • Profile picture of the author iAmNameLess
      Originally Posted by ericbryant View Post

      I agree, it is a process. From time to time I get a one call close, just because everything lines up, it's fun, but not really that big of a deal in the big picture if you factor in how infrequently it happens.
      Infrequently?

      If you ask for the appointment, you will get appointments.

      If you ask for the sale, you will get sales!
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      • Profile picture of the author sandalwood
        This is a great thread indeed. David, you did it man. As for one call closings in my insurance business that's what it is all about. I figured it would be that way w/my offline mktng biz (that's what I call our web design/building, marketing co) I thought it would be the same.

        Wrong! At least here. I found the biz people want a face to face so I changed my 30 second script to ask for an appt. Once I did that, it became, depending how you look at it, a two call close because I had to visit them or still a one call close by extension.

        In other words, they agreed to the appt to "buy" web work. Therefore is it really a two call sale or does it remain a one call close with the extension being me meeting them and outlining the work that'll be done and collecting the check?

        I hope I didn't lose anybody or miss the point myself. I know you can get the biz over the phone w/just one call. I do it all the time in my ins world. I've only done it once in my offline world. Otherwise we met eyeball to eyeball and I got the biz.

        Either way its done, you still have to ask them to buy. Period. If you don't ask, they won't buy unless they force feed the close back on you and the only thing you have left to do is take the check. How often does that happen, right?

        I would suspect you close when you start the conversation and not at the end. At least that's what the stock brokerage and ins businesses taught me. I don't it find it too much different in the offline biz world.

        Since I feel like I would be hijacking your thread if I went on about closing at the start of the conversation I'll say this has been one interesting conversation.

        Have a great day,

        Tom
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  • Profile picture of the author beeswarn
    When you're selling to another business, your prospect will understand that you don't want to leave work to drive out to their location to meet with them. They are the same way, if they're business people.

    Don't be afraid to ask questions on the phone. Especially the most important one -- asking for the order.
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  • Profile picture of the author beeswarn
    Don't feed the lefty troll(s).
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    • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
      Originally Posted by beeswarn View Post

      Don't feed the lefty troll(s).
      better yet, report him. And get his drivel removed completely.
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      Selling Ain't for Sissies!
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  • Profile picture of the author beeswarn
    Duplicate account, maybe?
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    • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
      Originally Posted by beeswarn View Post

      Duplicate account, maybe?
      Are you asking how to report him ?

      i don't know the proper way... but what i said was.

      Trolling, and possible Post boosting.

      that was it.

      If you mean some thing else with your question, i don't understand.
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  • Profile picture of the author beeswarn
    Ken, I think it's a duplicate account, that's all. Reported. This was a fine thread until that started.
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  • Profile picture of the author Hugh
    David,

    When I first got into sales I certainly didn't know how to close. But there
    was no second option. So I sat there, their supper getting cold, all 250
    pounds of me. Always smiling, always pleasant. Nobody would throw me
    out, so I knew if I sat there long enough, they would buy just to get me
    out. So they could eat or go to bed, whatever.

    I invented my own "First Call Close."

    Hugh
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    "Never make someone a priority in your life who makes you an option in theirs." Anon.
    "Some see private enterprise as a predatory target to be shot, others as a cow to be milked, but few are those who see it as a sturdy horse pulling the wagon." -- Winston Churchill

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    • Profile picture of the author InTh3Moment
      Originally Posted by Hugh View Post

      David,

      When I first got into sales I certainly didn't know how to close. But there
      was no second option. So I sat there, their supper getting cold, all 250
      pounds of me. Always smiling, always pleasant. Nobody would throw me
      out, so I knew if I sat there long enough, they would buy just to get me
      out. So they could eat or go to bed, whatever.

      I invented my own "First Call Close."

      Hugh
      Haha Hugh, that's funny. I am wondering if that strategy works for lightweights like me that are only about 160 lbs lol.

      So did you learn anything since those days? What would you say you now know about closing that you didn't then? (if you don't mind sharing).
      Thanks.
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  • Profile picture of the author cuttingedge
    Originally Posted by Ken_Caudill View Post

    First off, Bob, if you like what I have to show you, is there any reason we can't do business today?

    Ask 'em that and shut up.

    Good advise. This puts pressure on the propect to answer, but it also puts pressure on you, the salesman, to wait until they have answered and this is where a lot of us mess up,we talk first thus releaving the pressure and in many cases the sale.
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  • Profile picture of the author geotargeted
    Get them to keep saying YES.
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    • Profile picture of the author JoshN
      Originally Posted by geotargeted View Post

      Get them to keep saying YES.
      This sort of sales is taught in car dealerships (I know I used to work in dealerships).. separate yourself from the car sales types and you'll stand out.


      Stop trying to get them to say anything and start listening and truly understanding their problems. Then you won't have to think about what to say.


      This whole one call close is a myth if you're selling any sort of real solution.
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      • Profile picture of the author MaxwellB
        Originally Posted by JoshN View Post

        This sort of sales is taught in car dealerships (I know I used to work in dealerships).. separate yourself from the car sales types and you'll stand out.


        Stop trying to get them to say anything and start listening and truly understanding their problems. Then you won't have to think about what to say.


        This whole one call close is a myth if you're selling any sort of real solution.
        Absolutely wrong, how can you say that with a straight face?

        If the business owner is available to talk, you uncover a need, talk to them about the need and your solution to the need, and close the sale on the first call your saying in no way shape or form are you selling a real solution if that happens??

        Your just assuming that one call closes are forced onto the prospect and that they are pressured into taking out their credit card and giving you the number.
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        • Profile picture of the author JoshN
          Originally Posted by MaxwellB View Post

          Absolutely wrong, how can you say that with a straight face?

          If the business owner is available to talk, you uncover a need, talk to them about the need and your solution to the need, and close the sale on the first call your saying in no way shape or form are you selling a real solution if that happens??

          Your just assuming that one call closes are forced onto the prospect and that they are pressured into taking out their credit card and giving you the number.
          Do you think they can fully understand your offering and you can fully understand their need and fully relate your value in 1 call?

          Chances are if you're closing in 1 call, you're not charging enough money.
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          • Profile picture of the author MaxwellB
            Originally Posted by JoshN View Post

            Do you think they can fully understand your offering and you can fully understand their need and fully relate your value in 1 call?

            Chances are if you're closing in 1 call, you're not charging enough money.
            To answer your first question yes absolutely. You can know they have a need for a website if you ask them and they say they don't have one. Then through conversation and consultation you can absolutely portray the value.

            It really does depend on what your selling though. If your selling in a complex sales setting of course it won't happen in one call.

            I just don't think black and white statements like that can ever be true because there are a lot of different products/service/solutions and a lot of different needs and every vendor has pricing that works for them.

            Not charging enough money is relative only to the specific solution vendor. Some vendors may have pricing that is lower and justified by more efficient processes.

            If what you mean to say is your "leaving money on the table" that may be true but it still depends on the product/solution.

            Nothing is absolute
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  • Profile picture of the author Aermud
    It's very very very rare for me to make a one call close. The one call closes I do remember have been problem deals for me as well.
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  • Profile picture of the author Hugh
    I don't know if I can distill years of experience into one paragraph,
    but here goes. Buying anything is an emotional experience. You have
    got to paint mental images of the prospect owning your product. You
    have to get him drooling over the thought of owning your product.
    A the right moment, you start nodding "Yes" while making a point.
    Whether it's the first time or the 14th time, if he nods when I do,
    I ask the closing question and will not utter a sound until he answers
    my closing question. I keep this up until be either buys or make a
    definitive statement that he will not buy. I either close on first call,
    or he doesn't buy from me.

    Hugh
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    "Never make someone a priority in your life who makes you an option in theirs." Anon.
    "Some see private enterprise as a predatory target to be shot, others as a cow to be milked, but few are those who see it as a sturdy horse pulling the wagon." -- Winston Churchill

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    • Profile picture of the author MaxwellB
      Originally Posted by Hugh View Post

      I don't know if I can distill years of experience into one paragraph,
      but here goes. Buying anything is an emotional experience. You have
      got to paint mental images of the prospect owning your product. You
      have to get him drooling over the thought of owning your product.
      A the right moment, you start nodding "Yes" while making a point.
      Whether it's the first time or the 14th time, if he nods when I do,
      I ask the closing question and will not utter a sound until he answers
      my closing question. I keep this up until be either buys or make a
      definitive statement that he will not buy. I either close on first call,
      or he doesn't buy from me.

      Hugh
      What is your preferred closing question? Just curious as to if it's a soft or hard close.
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  • Profile picture of the author Hugh
    "Then let's get started"
    or
    "I'll need your check number"
    or
    "Red or Blue?"

    Not always a question, but moving the process forward.

    Hugh
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    "Never make someone a priority in your life who makes you an option in theirs." Anon.
    "Some see private enterprise as a predatory target to be shot, others as a cow to be milked, but few are those who see it as a sturdy horse pulling the wagon." -- Winston Churchill

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