***COLD CALLING 101*** - The "DOOR To DOOR" Kind.

by Michael Bucker 73 replies
Cold Calling 101


It seems there is a need for discussion of cold calling on the forum. Some love it and some hate it. Let me say cold calling is like any other form of marketing or pitching of ones services.

No matter your niche or your choice of marketing and pitching your services, most methods work it is simply a matter of doing it right. If you don’t believe me ask the mailer experts on this forum, the telemarketing experts, e-mailers, mobile marketers etc etc.

You will find every field someone is successful, because they have found some of the secrets to make their method work. There are laws that apply with each and once you know them, it will work for you as well.

So, here we are with cold calling. I am going to talk about face to face cold calling, and let others expand it to the phone etc. What I am going to share should be pretty much universal.

I cannot put an entire article on a thread so let’s start with just a few beginner ideas.

1. Plan your area you are going to work. Filling each day with prospects,understanding that a good plan makes all the difference. Do not simply go out without narrowing down your plan of attack. This is a numbers game like any other form of approaching clients. The better plan you have in where precisely you are going the better chances of success.

2. Have a plan on what you are going to say before you walk in. Not just the first sentence. Plan for any type of reaction and where to go from that point. If you know the direction you are going, find ways to stay on the path you are laying before the prospect. This comes through proper questions.

3. Find a way to create rapport within first 2 min. There are methods of doing this. Good solid methods.

4. Assume the sale!

Ok, there is the start now let us who have done this successfully, share with those who need help and build from here.
#offline marketing #101 #calling #cold
Avatar of Unregistered
  • Profile picture of the author John Durham
    Well coming from a man who DOES it, I appreciate your post here Mike. I know when you talk about making a daily plan you mean to actually list the "Names" of the businesses you will visit each day, not just writing something like "10", and crossing them off the list.

    I like that because it puts the vision in your head for each visit you make, and creates a level of forthought.

    Writing the names of the actual businesses you will visit each day, instead of just writing a number and knocking haphazardly can really increase your effectiveness and make sure you are using your time wisely "prospecting" and not just "suspecting".

    Theres my two cents for door to door. I know you know what you are talking about and make a hefty living with it... Its good to hear real world experience and not just theory.

    In any event, it works!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5222981].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
      Originally Posted by John Durham View Post

      Well coming from a man who DOES it, I appreciate your post here Mike. I know when you talk about making a daily plan you mean to actually list the "Names" of the businesses you will visit each day, not just writing something like "10", and crossing them off the list.

      !
      John yes you are exactly right once again. I did not fill in that blank because I knew I'd end up creating an article filling in all the blanks on a thread . Also I wanted people such as yourself to fill in those blanks. Thanks
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5223951].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author David Miller
    And here we go again!

    It's my hope that the naysayers find other threads to crab on about how they hate cold calling and how it doesn't work....

    As I understand it, the goal here is not a diatribe on finding other avenues of sales but to discuss methods and techniques.

    Here's one:

    Many years ago I sold the Yellow Pages and we would receive a territory and "walk it" until it was sold to a particular percentage ( I don't remember what the exact number was) but you stayed in that territory until it was reached.

    My goal was to set an appointment on that first call, although on occassion it was a one call close situation.

    I would walk in the place of business empty handed, business card in my pocket and that was it. My personal philosophy was that they would probably think of me as a customer and would come to greet me instead of me having to make the first introduction. It worked most times and it was hard to get the defensive wall up at that point.

    I would let them know that I wouldn't expect they would have a few minutes, seeing as how I dropped in unexpected, but I was on my way to see a business down the street and just stopped in to arrange a better time.

    An interesting thing happened virtually everytime. They would begin telling me why they had no intention of buying an ad in the Yellow Pages. I simply acknowledged their objection, and explained that I wasn't trying to sell them anything, that I only wanted to set a time to spend a few minutes showing them what we might be able to do.

    As if on que, this went on no less than 3 and no more than 6 times before I finally managed to make the appointment.

    Looking at what took place in that "appointment getting" approach I had:

    1. Answered all their initial objections
    2. Qualified them as to if they were a real prospect or not
    3. Found out why they weren't happy with their previous ad
    4. Had a pretty clear understanding of what they hoped a YP ad could acheive

    Now that's a lot of information and ammunition to go back with. The actual "appointment" took far less time than making the appointment. The actual presentation took place in that first meeting but they were so intent on not making the appointment they didn't know they had given me every bit of information I needed to come back with a targeted proposal that did everything they thought they needed.
    Signature
    The big lesson in life, baby, is never be scared of anyone or anything.
    -- FRANK SINATRA, quoted in The Way You Wear Your Hat
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5223038].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author gdale19
      Originally Posted by David Miller View Post

      And here we go again!

      It's my hope that the naysayers find other threads to crab on about how they hate cold calling and how it doesn't work....

      As I understand it, the goal here is not a diatribe on finding other avenues of sales but to discuss methods and techniques.

      Here's one:

      Many years ago I sold the Yellow Pages and we would receive a territory and "walk it" until it was sold to a particular percentage ( I don't remember what the exact number was) but you stayed in that territory until it was reached.

      My goal was to set an appointment on that first call, although on occassion it was a one call close situation.

      I would walk in the place of business empty handed, business card in my pocket and that was it. My personal philosophy was that they would probably think of me as a customer and would come to greet me instead of me having to make the first introduction. It worked most times and it was hard to get the defensive wall up at that point.

      I would let them know that I wouldn't expect they would have a few minutes, seeing as how I dropped in unexpected, but I was on my way to see a business down the street and just stopped in to arrange a better time.

      An interesting thing happened virtually everytime. They would begin telling me why they had no intention of buying an ad in the Yellow Pages. I simply acknowledged their objection, and explained that I wasn't trying to sell them anything, that I only wanted to set a time to spend a few minutes showing them what we might be able to do.

      As if on que, this went on no less than 3 and no more than 6 times before I finally managed to make the appointment.

      Looking at what took place in that "appointment getting" approach I had:

      1. Answered all their initial objections
      2. Qualified them as to if they were a real prospect or not
      3. Found out why they weren't happy with their previous ad
      4. Had a pretty clear understanding of what they hoped a YP ad could acheive

      Now that's a lot of information and ammunition to go back with. The actual "appointment" took far less time than making the appointment. The actual presentation took place in that first meeting but they were so intent on not making the appointment they didn't know they had given me every bit of information I needed to come back with a targeted proposal that did everything they thought they needed.
      I to was with the Yellow Pages and when I left I was Number 1 in bringing in new business. My approach was a little different, I walked in with my Yellow Pages and waited for them to tell me the Yellow Pages does not work anymore and I would then slam the Yellow pages down making a lot of noice and state " Well I have 3500 advertisers who disagree" Lets talk. Our presentation was 1 1/2 hours long
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5373959].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author amarketing
    Great information, guys.

    Cold calling is something that really appeals to be because it seems like it's something many folks can't, or don't care to, do. That means less competition. Now, I'm thinking about it in the context of telephone calling. Viewed in this light, cold calling also puts something else in your favor: numbers. I've read where John Durham wrote that an experience caller and make 500 dials in a day! Now, I'm not sure if he was talking about manually dialing, or using an auto-dialer, but either way that's a large number!

    Michael, I wonder if you could expound upon point 3 and 4?

    What are some of the ways you can build rapport quickly?

    What do you mean by "assume the sale"?

    Thanks for your information and clarification!
    Signature
    10 ORIGINAL PLR ARTICLES!
    HEALTH * FITNESS * DIET
    Each Article is 300+ to 500+ (MOSTLY 500+) WORDS
    **** -----> Only Selling This Pack to 4 PEOPLE <----- ****
    Only $80 PER PACK ...That's $8 an article! PM Me Before They're GONE!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5223709].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
      Originally Posted by amarketing View Post

      Great information, guys.

      Michael, I wonder if you could expound upon point 3 and 4?

      What are some of the ways you can build rapport quickly?

      What do you mean by "assume the sale"?

      Thanks for your information and clarification!
      Fast rapport, there are many ways but let me mention one. Become proactive. Think of any question statment or objection that may come up from your prospect. Write each on a list and then mastermind the answers with others when you are in the beginning of your pitch bring those issues up first if you bring up first what they are already thinking they begi to relate to you. this is a technique most do not use. That's my short explanation without actually teaching it completely. There are a few other methods I use.

      If you have done your job and created correct rapport that is when you can assume the sale. For example. Do not ask if they would like to buy. Give them three packages to choose from and ask which they would like. BTW three choices is the magic number. More is ok but no less than three. There is a reson for that. After the prospect chooses, write the invoice. Sales assumed when they chose which package. One way to assume the sale...

      I just did these last post on my phone. Forgive any typos please. Hope this helps my friend.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5224002].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author terip
        Originally Posted by Michael Bucker View Post

        Fast rapport, there are many ways but let me mention one. Become proactive. Think of any question statment or objection that may come up from your prospect. Write each on a list and then mastermind the answers with others when you are in the beginning of your pitch bring those issues up first if you bring up first what they are already thinking they begi to relate to you. this is a technique most do not use. That's my short explanation without actually teaching it completely. There are a few other methods I use.

        If you have done your job and created correct rapport that is when you can assume the sale. For example. Do not ask if they would like to buy. Give them three packages to choose from and ask which they would like. BTW three choices is the magic number. More is ok but no less than three. There is a reson for that. After the prospect chooses, write the invoice. Sales assumed when they chose which package. One way to assume the sale...

        I just did these last post on my phone. Forgive any typos please. Hope this helps my friend.
        This is certainly helpful. In my experience, building rapport, even small ones, can increase the chances of setting an appointment to a great degree. People generally do not like pushy salesmen, even if it is just for setting an appointment. If a call starts out immediately like "are you interested in purchasing?" would immediately end in a "sorry not interested."

        You just have to make sure that you build the right rapport and get the right timing to say it too
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5224386].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author BusinessGuru
      Originally Posted by amarketing View Post

      Great information, guys.

      Cold calling is something that really appeals to be because it seems like it's something many folks can't, or don't care to, do. That means less competition. Now, I'm thinking about it in the context of telephone calling. Viewed in this light, cold calling also puts something else in your favor: numbers. I've read where John Durham wrote that an experience caller and make 500 dials in a day! Now, I'm not sure if he was talking about manually dialing, or using an auto-dialer, but either way that's a large number!

      Michael, I wonder if you could expound upon point 3 and 4?

      What are some of the ways you can build rapport quickly?

      What do you mean by "assume the sale"?

      Thanks for your information and clarification!
      Personally, I would have to say that I prefer cold calling to approaching friends and family. I have found that when I attempted to get family involved in by business endeavors it was an uphill battle.

      However, once I decided to test out the cold market, my business took off. However, if there is anything I can advise when dealing with the cold market are these following points.

      1. Don't try to convince or sell; simply present the information and let the prospect reach their own conclusion.

      2. Never, ever give your power away. Either remain on higher ground or see the prospect as an equal, but never lower yourself to make a sale.

      3. You must understand the odds of the game you intend to play. It's simply like rolling a dice. If it takes you 20 times to roll a seven, you now know your odds, and with this you can defeat your competition. It's exactly the same with the cold market.
      Signature

      This Is The Most Stunning Way To Make A Fortune On The Internet: MakeCashWithAlex.com

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5351678].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
        Originally Posted by BusinessGuru View Post

        2. Never, ever give your power away. Either remain on higher ground or see the prospect as an equal, but never lower yourself to make a sale.
        Exactly! These business owners are our peers. We own a business too! They are our equals in this sense.

        Be ready to walk out the door in a heartbeat if they insist that they don't want to use your services, and don't bother leaving a business card.
        Signature
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5351726].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
          Originally Posted by Rus Sells View Post

          Exactly! These business owners are our peers. We own a business too! They are our equals in this sense.

          Be ready to walk out the door in a heartbeat if they insist that they don't want to use your services, and don't bother leaving a business card.

          Russ hits another home run point. Listen folks you are a buiness owner and to presetn yourslef in any other way will only bring employee pay not owner pay.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5359689].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Russel Mogul
    It can be absolute torture but with enough persistence -it eventually pays off.
    I did it once about 5 years ago for the local council, I had an official badge and everything-I got used to getting the door slammed in my face........here's the best part .....I wasn't even selling anything. I found the better I got with reading body language and countering objections -the more research papers I got back. Which was nice since we got paid a flat rate and extra cash ncentives.

    I recently picked up Jordan Belfort straight line persuasion system and well the first module has totally blown me away.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5224400].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
      Originally Posted by terip View Post

      This is certainly helpful. In my experience, building rapport, People generally do not like pushy salesmen "sorry not interested."
      Originally Posted by Russel Mogul View Post

      It can be absolute torture but with enough persistence -it eventually pays off.


      Here is where I would like to point out that some may think these to views are different but I would like to point out that they indeed complement one another and work perfectly together.

      You see being pushy will indeed get you a very short conversation and likely hood of no meeting. However, there is a vast difference between being pushy and being persistent or as I like to call it “Professionally Persistent”.

      In order to properly exert professional persistence one must have built proper rapport first. If done correctly you are not only good with being persistent, it is your duty to do so, simply for the fact that you have done it right where others have failed. You owe it to your client to be professionally persistent where those who have no rapport are simply pushy.

      Again this is an art that professionals develop and can only be done with certain other ingredients in the mix such as rapport, pro-activeness, correct questions and expansions.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5235583].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author John Durham
        Some guy left a printed basic flyer on my door earlier today, and when I found it, I opened it and it said "Quality Painting. We do large and small jobs. Quality work. For A Quote Call Phillip...."

        The first thing I did was think "Do I have any painting jobs around here I need done?" And thought "well if I think of something later I will know who to call now", and I put it in a drawer and further thought...

        "I'll bet if 100 people stopped for a half a second and thought 'Do I need any paint jobs?', that at least a few of them would decided they 'did' and maybe give him a call".

        My next thought was "How can I share this"?

        And I just did!

        My stopping momentarily and asking myself that question, made me realize that alot of others might too...and this guy actually might have a fighting chance to get significant business with his flyers.

        Thats door to door right?

        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5237443].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author polishstorm
    Hey Russell, I have heard a little. It of the Jordan Belford thing. Can you pm me a copy or email it to me?

    Thanks
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5226969].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author David Miller
      Jordan Belfort (born July 9, 1962) is an American author, motivational speaker and former white collar criminal who spent 22 months in jail for offences related to stock market manipulation and running a boiler room.[1] In the 1990s, he founded brokerage firm Stratton Oakmont which functioned as a boiler room, and developed a hard-partying lifestyle, which included a serious drug addiction (namely Quaaludes).[2][3] The firm also served as inspiration for the film Boiler Room.[4] As the owner of Stratton Oakmont, he employed over 1000 stockbrokers and was involved in stock issues totalling more than $1 billion, including an equity raising for footwear company Steve Madden Ltd.


      Doesn't mean he didn't understand how to sell!
      Signature
      The big lesson in life, baby, is never be scared of anyone or anything.
      -- FRANK SINATRA, quoted in The Way You Wear Your Hat
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5229383].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author MRomeo09
        Originally Posted by David Miller View Post

        Jordan Belfort (born July 9, 1962) is an American author, motivational speaker and former white collar criminal who spent 22 months in jail for offences related to stock market manipulation and running a boiler room.[1] In the 1990s, he founded brokerage firm Stratton Oakmont which functioned as a boiler room, and developed a hard-partying lifestyle, which included a serious drug addiction (namely Quaaludes).[2][3] The firm also served as inspiration for the film Boiler Room.[4] As the owner of Stratton Oakmont, he employed over 1000 stockbrokers and was involved in stock issues totalling more than $1 billion, including an equity raising for footwear company Steve Madden Ltd.




        Doesn't mean he didn't understand how to sell!
        I gotta say, the Jordan Belfort Straight Line Persuasion system is so good. I've not seen anything like it. It's one of the best $2k investments I've ever made. His work on tonality is second to none. We use it mostly for inbound calling and have had spectacular successes with it.

        Marcos
        Signature
        We do not have to become heroes overnight. Just a step at a time, meeting each thing that comes up ... discovering we have the strength to stare it down. - Eleanor Roosevelt

        Your opinion of yourself becomes your reality. If you have all these doubts, then no one will believe in you and everything will go wrong. If you think the opposite, the opposite will happen. It’s that simple.-Curtis Jackson- 50 Cent
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5232733].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
    A couple of summers ago, I spent debugging a cold calling script to about 300 business owners in Orange County on foot. The service was SEO.

    I burned through lots of businesses in the beginning, but by midpoint, I was closing 10% overall on a $2500 - $5000 sale plus the continuity program.

    Not great, not bad. But doable.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5230848].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
      Originally Posted by RickDuris View Post

      A couple of summers ago, I spent debugging a cold calling script to about 300 business owners in Orange County on foot. The service was SEO.

      I burned through lots of businesses in the beginning, but by midpoint, I was closing 10% overall on a $2500 - $5000 sale plus the continuity program.

      Not great, not bad. But doable.

      My friend 10 percent is actually very accurate and very duable numbers. It is actually close to national averages of sales universally accross the nation. There are techniques to strengthen that number. However. I train all across our nation and have train over 1000 sales people. The top 2 percent in the nation still only close 25 percent of prospects, and they are the very best.

      As for face to face cold calling results, the reason I was not online to respond today is because I was teaching a class that I closed through face to face cold calling. I charged my first time introductory price of $2,000 for the day. It does not take a super salesman to get these kind of results. All you have to do is understand HOW to do it. Anyone can do it!!

      Again doing this on my phone tonight forgive typos please. Hope this helps and encourages some of my fellow warriors.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5231348].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author John Durham
        Originally Posted by Michael Bucker View Post


        As for face to face cold calling results, the reason I was not online to respond today is because I was teaching a class that I closed through face to face cold calling. I charged my first time introductory price of $2,000 for the day.
        Nice one bud, are you getting them on the long haul contract?
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5231396].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author PPC-Coach
    I used to do cold calling & knocking on doors. I'm sure some can do it, but man I still wake up in cold shivers at night from those nightmare days.

    If you're closing at 10% on a cold call, you are a super duper super star.

    Can I hire you?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5231435].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author John Durham
    Closing "prospects" is not the same as "prospecting". Closing actual "pitches" should be ten percent or higher easily.

    In other words, most people spend their day saying "hi" and not getting past the greeting, as opposed to actually pitching... there is a dial to pitch ratio, and a pitch to close ratio in my book.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5231470].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
      Originally Posted by David Miller View Post

      Looking at what took place in that "appointment getting" approach I had:

      1. Answered all their initial objections
      2. Qualified them as to if they were a real prospect or not
      3. Found out why they weren't happy with their previous ad
      4. Had a pretty clear understanding of what they hoped a YP ad could acheive


      Excellent David you always bring good stuff to the table. You can take this and add something that will make it even better which I bet you did over time.

      Here are two techniques I would use to make these steps even more affective.

      1. Put a small recorder in my pocket and record each encounter with each prospect and listen back to myself later. You would be surprised the things you do and do not say. This will allow you to also write down any and all weaknesses, and correct it before approaching the next set of prospects the next day.

      2. If one pays attention they will soon discover that most prospects have the same initial questions, statements or even objections. After each session write down each objection. Hopefully you recorded that session with a pocket recorder.

      You will soon find that you will only need the recorder for a short period of time, or if writing all objections down (you can do this on a pad of paper as if taking notes as soon as they ask the question or objection), you will find soon your list will repeat itself.

      Once this happened, write down your solutions. The next day and nest set of prospects do not wait for them to bring the subjects up first. You will create incredible rapport.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5235193].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author amarketing
    Michael, thanks a lot for sharing that information for me and everyone else. The 10% you and John were talking about, that's the percentage of people you actually talk to, right? I'm sure that doesn't include the businesses that were closed or where the owner wasn't in or the phone numbers that were disconnected, etc.

    Let me see if I correctly understand the difference between being push and being professionally persistent. Being pushy (I'm referring to phone sales, but this could probably apply to face-to-face as well) is giving a hard-on sales pitch right off the bat and, when the prospect brings up an objection, ignoring the objection (or lightly brushing it off) and continuing with the pitch. However being "professionally persistent" is answering the objections/concerns while viewing them with importance and continuing to bounce off of every objection until they either hang up, or they finally give in and buy. Am I getting the idea right?

    Also, in assuming the sale, you say to present no less than 3 options and ask which one they would like to choose. I was thinking in terms of website design services and calling the person and then, after explaining the site cost and hosting cost, ending with something like "Ok, I'm going to ask you a few questions so we can personalize the site to your business. How would you like your business name to be displayed, 'Johnson Services'?" Does that sound like a good way of assuming the sale while not offering a choice of 3 offers?

    Also, I like your ideas of planning rebuttals ahead of time. However, I'm kind of thinking (now, feel free to correct me on this) that it would be detrimental to bring up the actual rebuttals before the client does. I know you said this is key to creating rapport, but it seems like this may raise a concern the prospect might not even be thinking about. What might be better is to give the solutions to the concern. I.e, instead of bringing up the hosting issue as "I know that (price) sounds high," it would be better to say, "for you hosting payment you get complete maintenance, free updates, domain name renewal, etc." Of course, if you find that a particular objection almost always come up, than it would probably be fine (if not desirable) to bring up the objection itself. What do you think?

    This is a really great thread you have started, thanks for keeping it up to date and answering everyone's questions. When I have a few thousand dollars extra, I'd like to attend one of your seminars. I'm sure that top 2% of sales people you spoke of were probably trained by you! Also, are there any book, or authors you can recommend to become better at selling/phone sales/cold calling?

    Thanks again.
    Signature
    10 ORIGINAL PLR ARTICLES!
    HEALTH * FITNESS * DIET
    Each Article is 300+ to 500+ (MOSTLY 500+) WORDS
    **** -----> Only Selling This Pack to 4 PEOPLE <----- ****
    Only $80 PER PACK ...That's $8 an article! PM Me Before They're GONE!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5238269].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
      Michael, thanks a lot for sharing that information for me and everyone else. The 10% you and John were talking about, that's the percentage of people you actually talk to, right?


      First fellow warrior let me say thank you for your kind words. You mentioned John and I am glad he jumped on this thread because he is indeed a phone pro where I am a face to face pro. Yes the 10 percent is meant for those you speak to; you also count every time you speak to them until the close. Every conversation counts as an opportunity. The number of “opportunities” verses sold prospects equals you percentage. Thus nationally the average in all types of sales is around 10%-15%. It is one moving scale depending on your profession.


      Let me see if I correctly understand the difference between being push and being professionally persistent

      You are pretty accurate on this one. However I would just add that you are not to laid back that you don’t ask for the sale and the softer approach still has excellent content. The problem with some sales people who take the laid back approach is they get so busy being nice they forget to be professionally persistent. Often one becomes timid. And as Zig once said “Timid salespeople raise skinny kinds”.


      Does that sound like a good way of assuming the sale while not offering a choice of 3 offers?


      Here is where you may want to trust my experience as a trainer/coach. I have trained hundreds of sales people, and the good part about that is I understand that all you need is the reason why I say give 3 choices.
      First let me say this. The assumptive close you are using is good and I like it. Most are not being assumptive at all, that my friend puts you a step ahead regardless. You can also combine both yours and mine if you like.

      Why 3 choices. I have learned that in psychology of how the average human mind works when given choices they are more likely to buy. Here is why. Man by nature is both rebellious and independent. With that in mind think about this, when someone give you once choice and one choice only what does that mean…….. It is saying to most, take it or leave it. Subconsciously, when presented with only one option we hear “take it or leave it”. Mind you, you never said that however it is what is heard.

      When most are told “take it or leave it” what do they do? Most red blooded Americans say, “Ok I will leave it then.”

      Two choices free it up a little but is still sort of cornering a person. Example: I tell my 8 year old son “Aidan you can either do this or that. Those are your two choices. When someone tell you “this or that” it may be a choice but does not feel much like one.

      In the human mind the magic number of freedom is three. You can do this, or you can to this, and if you want you can even do this……. “Oh nice I have a choice!!” the last guy I talked to only gave me one choice. Take it or leave it. So, I left it.

      However, let me say this if you are being assumptive with your one choice it is more powerful than if you one have one choice and you “ask” them if they want it.


      Also, I like your ideas of planning rebuttals ahead of time. However, I'm kind of thinking (now, feel free to correct me on this) that it would be detrimental to bring up the actual rebuttals before the client does

      No my friend it does not put you in a negative position. First you are correct, take the most often used objections and questions and bring those up proactively. As far as bringing up something and making it a concern when it was not before is not a fear. My friend this is probably the most common question I get from unseasoned sales people and a few vets. Most vets know better and here is why.

      The truth is if it was not a concern for them before you brought it up, the likely hood that it will become a concern suddenly is not likely. Because, if it is something that they are concerned about eventually it will come out anyway then you become reactive and have to back pedal.

      If anything they will appreciate that you brought up something they did not think about. Also remember the reason you are not afraid to bring it up is because my friend you already have the answer. The reason you are bringing the possible obstacle up in the first place is because you have it solved to the point that it will not be a problem for your clients, thanks to you!!


      When I have a few thousand dollars extra, I'd like to attend one of your seminars. I'm sure that top 2% of sales people you spoke of were probably trained by you! Also, are there any book, or authors you can recommend to become better at selling/phone sales/cold calling?


      My friend this is not a problem, my seminars do not cost $2000. I actually make $14,000 -$37,000 per seminar I do. However each individual only pay $200 -$350 to attend. The $2,000 I mentioned above was a single day a company paid for me to come into their place of business to help their staff for the day.

      I am releasing a WSO soon that may help you. I will be breaking down things to say to potential clients and why. As not to plug it in this thread let me know if you are interested and I will PM with the title. I will be releasing it, probably by the end of the weekend. Also it is face to face, however most principles will apply universally.

      For phone material I would get as much of Jon articles as I can. I won’t be releasing anything on phone for while I don’t think. I have some great stuff for phone but nothing like John Durham has. I know when to bow out to a specialist in any one area.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5242137].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author RichSerafini
    One thing that has worked for me in the past, is to walk in to a business and be their customer. Once you are in there as a customer, you can easily talk to the owner of the business. Then, you don't feel like you are selling - just talking to another person about what you do.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5242765].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
      Originally Posted by Rich Serafini View Post

      One thing that has worked for me in the past, is to walk in to a business and be their customer. Once you are in there as a customer, you can easily talk to the owner of the business. Then, you don't feel like you are selling - just talking to another person about what you do.

      Rich has a good point here. Now I know we cannot become a customer to every business that we want to sell to. However it is affective and the bigger point here is approaching a prospect with the mentality of we are just talking person to person. The more casual you can be while staying on point with your objective the great chance of rapport you can develop. Again this is something that comes more with us who have spent time developing the craft of selling and communication. However it is affective. The plane truth is the more techniques you have the better off you are because, as you have found every person is a touch different.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5243520].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author David Miller
        Just a note on 3 choices:

        I'm a firm believer in offering 3 choices. It's like a good, better, best proposition. Although it's absolutely true that we all like choices, we also don't like to be locked into a choice we make when there's something better we could have had.

        To explain what I mean, I used to sell a product that had 3 payment options. The best option provided for a high level of protection. The better option didn't offer the high level of protection but allowed the customer to get that same level of protection once their payments had been enough to match what they would have had to pay for the best option (as a downpayment). The good option did not provide any level of protection but did allow the buyer to get the product on budget payments, and also gave them the option to upgrade to the better or best at anytime, for a fee.

        I hope that's not TOO confusing, I got a little dizzy writing it, but I think what it says is that people always seem to want the best. They often say no because they can't afford it, or may not see the full value at that moment. By giving them a vehicle that allows them to get the best at some time in the future, it makes them feel that any decision (buying decision) is a good one.
        Signature
        The big lesson in life, baby, is never be scared of anyone or anything.
        -- FRANK SINATRA, quoted in The Way You Wear Your Hat
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5244250].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
          Originally Posted by David Miller View Post

          Just a note on 3 choices:

          I'm a firm believer in offering 3 choices. It's like a good, better, best proposition. Although it's absolutely true that we all like choices, we also don't like to be locked into a choice we make when there's something better we could have had.

          To explain what I mean, I used to sell a product that had 3 payment options. The best option provided for a high level of protection. The better option didn't offer the high level of protection but allowed the customer to get that same level of protection once their payments had been enough to match what they would have had to pay for the best option (as a downpayment). The good option did not provide any level of protection but did allow the buyer to get the product on budget payments, and also gave them the option to upgrade to the better or best at anytime, for a fee.

          I hope that's not TOO confusing, I got a little dizzy writing it, but I think what it says is that people always seem to want the best. They often say no because they can't afford it, or may not see the full value at that moment. By giving them a vehicle that allows them to get the best at some time in the future, it makes them feel that any decision (buying decision) is a good one.
          Not confusing at all David, well atleast not to me. Great example of what a three choice method can do.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5281754].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author russkampmann
            I used to do BtoB, door to door. I worked an area at a time so as to not waste time or gasoline.

            The receptionist / secretary was the key to seeing the decision maker. When I couldn't see the decision maker, I always left a brochure or catalog to be forwarded to the decision maker. Of course, the key on the initial visit was to find out the name of the decision maker.

            Within a day or so, I followed up with a phone call to the decision maker for an appointment. Sometimes it worked. Sometimes not.

            What I liked best about 'cold calling' was that I had no expectations. I just worked the plan.
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5281850].message }}
            • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
              Originally Posted by russkampmann View Post

              I used to do BtoB, door to door. I worked an area at a time so as to not waste time or gasoline.

              The receptionist / secretary was the key to seeing the decision maker. When I couldn't see the decision maker, I always left a brochure or catalog to be forwarded to the decision maker. Of course, the key on the initial visit was to find out the name of the decision maker.

              Within a day or so, I followed up with a phone call to the decision maker for an appointment. Sometimes it worked. Sometimes not.

              What I liked best about 'cold calling' was that I had no expectations. I just worked the plan.


              Door to door is exactly that, working the plan. As in any type of marketing working the plan is the most vital key. No expectations keep the discouragement down.

              One reason I have such good success rate is that I go in with an affiliate by name that is sponsoring what I do for a small fee. This affiliate is highly respected in the businesses I go into. They have nothing to do with what I offer. They are only there in name, but it buys me the few minutes I need to start my presentation.
              {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5285120].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author John Durham
    I like to make the first offer percentage wise seem too close to the middle offer to pass up the middle offer, price wise... then make the high offer rediculously high... so that people always choose the middle because it "makes the most sense".

    In other words, for just 200 bucks more you get 10 times the benefit... and tack on an extra two hundred bucks. It not only points them to the choice but when they see what they get for a couple hundred bucks less comparitively it makes it seem like the greatest deal in the world that they better not pass up.... or else down the road they will get stuck with offer one type packages, which pale in comparison.

    If this makes any sense... if not, just let me say "It works". Not only does it steer more people toward the middle, but it also closes more sales period.

    Sam Walton couldnt sell leg warmers anymore because they had went out of style... So he stuck a shelf out on the retail floor that said "legwarmers $1.00 per pair", next to one that said "Closeout legwarmers 5 pairs for a dollar".

    And sold out almost overnight and cleared the overstock, even though nobody had any use for legwarmers. The comparison looked too attractive, and people felt they would be smart to take the offer while it lasted.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5244917].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author ERPLeadsWriter
    Originally Posted by Michael Bucker View Post

    Assume the sale!
    Wait, what does that mean? I read at least more than one telemarketing blog that said telemarketers are just supposed to just bring the two parties together (their client and the prospect). They do not try to make the sale themselves because that just adds to the pushy phone salesman image. :confused:
    Signature
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5245228].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author John Durham
    Assume the sale means...

    Let me ask you a few questions bob, do you folks have a company logo?

    No , thats no problem our designers are pros at this,

    And is this the address you would want on your Google places listing?
    Okay great,

    and How about company colors, do you have company colors you would want on your home page...?

    Okay great. Can do...

    Have you got a pen Bob? Great heres my number in case you develop any questions, like I said we can do this for you for about $200.00,

    Now as far as billing Bob we take visa mastercard and American express, which one of those is going to work best for you today?


    That my friend, is assuming a sale.

    Its only being pushy if you have no style and suck at it.

    Real pro's do it well through practice and closing seems like the logical end for the customer.

    However , we are yet again "Chasing Deer..." when we are supposed to be coon hunting.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5245382].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
      Hank you for answering that question john, for me there is no need to answer it because the title says Door to door cold calls not telemarketing. Its good to have other experts to answer questions in their field.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5245409].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author John Durham
      Originally Posted by John Durham View Post

      we are yet again "Chasing Deer..." when we are supposed to be coon hunting.

      ................That.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5245419].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author amarketing
        Let me start off by apologizing to Michael for taking his door-to-door thread off-track. He's be great enough to lend his expertise in this field, and here I am dragging it into the telemarketing arena. I'll try to keep things more general Michael, as you are full of great, interesting, information that I want to keep learning and I'm sure I can apply it to phone sales, anyway.

        Thanks for your detailed post, Michael, answering all of my questions one by one. I learned a lot!

        You are pretty accurate on this one. However I would just add that you are not to laid back that you don’t ask for the sale and the softer approach still has excellent content. The problem with some sales people who take the laid back approach is they get so busy being nice they forget to be professionally persistent. Often one becomes timid. And as Zig once said “Timid salespeople raise skinny kinds”.
        Thanks for confirming on this one. What you say is true about being too laid-back. I think that's where having a "direction" in mind helps. You don't forget your objective (making a sale).

        Here is where you may want to trust my experience as a trainer/coach. I have trained hundreds of sales people, and the good part about that is I understand that all you need is the reason why I say give 3 choices.
        First let me say this. The assumptive close you are using is good and I like it. Most are not being assumptive at all, that my friend puts you a step ahead regardless. You can also combine both yours and mine if you like.
        Thanks for going more in-depth on this. I remember one of the first things I read on sales and it was to "ask for the sale." It pointed out how so many sales people give a great presentation, but fail to get the sale because they don't ask.

        It appears that "assuming" the sale pretty much takes this one step further. I like how you explained the "3 choices" approach and why it works. I guess the reason I was leaning towards one choice was two-fold: 1. I don't really have any other offers than website and hosting (I've got a lot to learn, but I will). Also, I mainly wanted to build up a client-base and hosting income...maybe even by giving away free sites and charging more for hosting! 2. I remember that from reading John's posts, a business owner doesn't buy when he's confused and figured that by giving multiple choices, it would confuse him.

        However, you're the expert and your logic and experience certainly out weigh my assumptions. So, what I think I will do is create 2 more offers around my ideal one and take a cue from John's post here and price them so as to "direct the customer" to the one I want to go with by making it appear to be the best value (thanks, John, for that strategy). I'll probably figure out a way to clearly explain them without being confusing.

        Now, this is probably my inexperience talking when I say that asking which offer they would like seems like it would make it easy for them to say "None!" Instead, I could probably say something like "For your business I would recommend the silver package, it's going to give you the most value for your money. Now, to confirm, your phone number is ...." This seems like assuming the sale a little morose than asking which package they would like. But, this also might take away from the feeling of freedom you are trying to create by offering the 3 choices, so I may be totally wrong in this approach. maybe my concerns about them choosing none out of the three offers are totally unfounded, anyway.

        The truth is if it was not a concern for them before you brought it up, the likely hood that it will become a concern suddenly is not likely. Because, if it is something that they are concerned about eventually it will come out anyway then you become reactive and have to back pedal.
        This really sums up a lot. If they are going to be concerned about something, they will be, so address it now. If they aren't going to be concerned, than bringing it up won't make a difference. Thanks for laying out the reality of bringing up concerned. I'm sure this is something that you have just develop over time as you talk to prospects and see what keeps coming up.

        For phone material I would get as much of Jon articles as I can.
        That's for sure! John really knows the stuff when it comes to the phone. By the way, thanks for the "over the phone assumption" post, John. Really good example.

        However , we are yet again "Chasing Deer..." when we are supposed to be coon hunting.
        I just had to burst out laughing when I read that one...it's true, though. So I'll try to relegate my more phone-pertinent questions to you, John.

        Thanks so much Michael, John, and everyone else for your great information! You can be sure I'll be back with any more questions that come to mind. I've learned so much already after only a few posts!
        Signature
        10 ORIGINAL PLR ARTICLES!
        HEALTH * FITNESS * DIET
        Each Article is 300+ to 500+ (MOSTLY 500+) WORDS
        **** -----> Only Selling This Pack to 4 PEOPLE <----- ****
        Only $80 PER PACK ...That's $8 an article! PM Me Before They're GONE!
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5246457].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
          Originally Posted by amarketing View Post


          Now, this is probably my inexperience talking when I say that asking which offer they would like seems like it would make it easy for them to say "None!" Instead, I could probably say something like "For your business I would recommend the silver package, it's going to give you the most value for your money. Now, to confirm, your phone number is ...." This seems like assuming the sale a little morose than asking which package they would like. But, this also might take away from the feeling of freedom you are trying to create by offering the 3 choices, so I may be totally wrong in this approach. maybe my concerns about them choosing none out of the three offers are totally unfounded, anyway.
          Ok I want to help you a little more on this one. When you give three choices and they pick one, at the point that they pick an option they are committing to buy. It is very assumptive.
          Now as for the three choices let me give you a good set up for this. If you are in front of the customer lay this out in front of them. If they are on the phone have them write this out so they are looking at what you are looking at.

          A. $1,500
          B. $1,000
          C. $500

          My friend, build three packages with the middle one being the most attractive. Here is an example of what you could say. Mind you I do not sell websites or hosting myself. This is from what I do understand about this area from those close to me who do sell websites and hosting.

          With package A. I will come to your place of business and build the sight and you can watch the progress as I build if over 1-3 day period. You receive unlimited changes for 1 month and the monthly hosting and changes after 30 days are $100 monthly for unlimited changes.

          With package B. Most don’t feel the need for the website to be built at their actual business, with a series of emails and phone conversation I will build your site to full satisfaction. Unlimited changes for 30 days and hosting is $19.95 a month with 50 changes a month.

          With package C. You receive a website with 5 changes limit a month at a hosting cost of $9.99.
          Regardless of your content with your ABC packages what you say next is most important!

          A. $1,500 B. $1,000 C. $500

          Mr. Prospect, those are your three packages. Now, not all my clients give me an A but not all of them give me a C either. Where would you like to rate me? Or Which would you like?
          He or she is grading you A B or C. People like rating what they think another person is worth. Just take a look at programs like American idol. The public sits at home and rates each person. Its a part of human nature and we enjoy giving our grade or rating one anything we can.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5248928].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author John Durham
    No Prob,

    Frankly, assuming the sale door to door works about the same way, only you have a pad and pen in your hand and you are standing there with the clients asking questions and writing the answers....


    I am usually pointing to a pad saying "which one of those two is gonna work best for you today bob...".

    The opposite of assuming is "asking"...

    "Would this interest you today Bob"?

    Thats asking.

    Assuming is just proceeding as if there is interest, and if you have sold them its a good assumption, otherwise you are asking them to think about if they want it, after they have already been sold, which is where alot of people back out...on second thought.

    So dont ask, assume instead.

    It works the same with door to door.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5249174].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
      Originally Posted by John Durham View Post

      No Prob,


      Assuming is just proceeding as if there is interest, and if you have sold them its a good assumption, otherwise you are asking them to think about if they want it, after they have already been sold, which is where alot of people back out...on second thought.
      Excellent summary of what assuming the sales means. We are giving out a lot of good info on this thread!!
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5250158].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Hugh
    Many years ago I was selling restaurant supplies in the D.C. area.
    The best china salesman I ever saw always started showing 3 patterns.
    But instead of pushing for the sale, he would just ask questions. And
    more questions. Subtly trying to get the restaurant owner to eliminate
    one of the patterns. He would then take that pattern off the table and
    then shut up. The customer was left with an "either or" decision. He
    would sell himself.

    I have learned to always create 3 bundles of whatever I am selling, trying
    to eliminate one. In his own mind the customer is deciding which of the
    remaining 2 is best for him.

    Works for me.

    Hugh
    Signature

    "Never make someone a priority in your life who makes you an option in theirs." Anon.
    "Some see private enterprise as a predatory target to be shot, others as a cow to be milked, but few are those who see it as a sturdy horse pulling the wagon." -- Winston Churchill

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5251327].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
      Originally Posted by Hugh View Post

      Many years ago I was selling restaurant supplies in the D.C. area.
      The best china salesman I ever saw always started showing 3 patterns.
      But instead of pushing for the sale, he would just ask questions. And
      more questions. Subtly trying to get the restaurant owner to eliminate
      one of the patterns. He would then take that pattern off the table and
      then shut up. The customer was left with an "either or" decision. He
      would sell himself.

      I have learned to always create 3 bundles of whatever I am selling, trying
      to eliminate one. In his own mind the customer is deciding which of the
      remaining 2 is best for him.

      Works for me.

      Hugh
      Good example of choice combined with assumpitve close. I like that you pointed out that in his mind he the customer was deciding. One believing in their process is most important. People are often convienced by how much you are convienced.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5252625].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author amarketing
    John and Michael, thanks, guys for helping me to better understand the concept of assuming the sale! This is obviously a very important "skill" in being a great salesman, so I'm sure my deeper understanding of it will really pay dividends in the future.

    I see that my perception of assuming the sale (that is,virtually putting the pen in their hand and starting to fill out the order form for them!), is probably being more pushy than assumptive. Michael, I like how you sum up the 3 choices as 3 price points! It keeps things simple for the prospect.

    When I call on the prospect, should I explain the 3 options continuously, like in one breath, or should I stop periodically and ask if they are following me? Part of me thinks the latter is more polite, but then again, it may give them an opening to dismiss my offer before fully hearing it.

    You've convinced me that 3 offers are better than one. I was a little unsure at first, but your skill in the sales field and the logic you use has changed my mind. Let us a little more in depth on presenting it.

    Thanks for all of your efforts in this thread!
    Signature
    10 ORIGINAL PLR ARTICLES!
    HEALTH * FITNESS * DIET
    Each Article is 300+ to 500+ (MOSTLY 500+) WORDS
    **** -----> Only Selling This Pack to 4 PEOPLE <----- ****
    Only $80 PER PACK ...That's $8 an article! PM Me Before They're GONE!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5252707].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
    It seems we delivered a touch more than an effort lol. Just playing fellow warrior I am glad I could help. As a trainer it is always nice when a light come on for anyone I help. I love sharing info that actually helps another in their effort against the grind.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5261062].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author amarketing
    Ha, you're right..."effort" is an understatement! You and John have shared so much in this thread that it's like a crash-course in in-person selling.

    When you go into describing the offers, do you try to do it all at once? That is, do you not let the other party speak until you have finished describing the offers, or do you stop in-between and make sure they are still following you?

    Thanks so much for going in-detail with all of our questions!
    Signature
    10 ORIGINAL PLR ARTICLES!
    HEALTH * FITNESS * DIET
    Each Article is 300+ to 500+ (MOSTLY 500+) WORDS
    **** -----> Only Selling This Pack to 4 PEOPLE <----- ****
    Only $80 PER PACK ...That's $8 an article! PM Me Before They're GONE!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5267602].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
    I would make the pace a comfortable one that is always moving forward but give them room to be able to speak up if they wish. It will not change the pyschology of what is going on. Most of the time the prosepct will allow you to present it fully.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5272343].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author amarketing
    Michael, you mentioned asking questions. Could you go into more detail on exactly what kind of questions to ask, and how to ask them so as to maintain "flow" and not give the prospect a way to "get out" of the pitch?

    This thread keeps getting better and better.
    Signature
    10 ORIGINAL PLR ARTICLES!
    HEALTH * FITNESS * DIET
    Each Article is 300+ to 500+ (MOSTLY 500+) WORDS
    **** -----> Only Selling This Pack to 4 PEOPLE <----- ****
    Only $80 PER PACK ...That's $8 an article! PM Me Before They're GONE!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5287884].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
    Questions to ask?

    Your questions should be proactive in nature. Brainstorm and think of all the questions, statements or objections that could come up in the initial conversation with your prospect. If you don’t have any, place a recorder on your next 5 to 10 conversations and you will find that most of the questions statements or objections are pretty much the same from person to person. Brainstorming with others is very beneficial as well.

    Once you have this list form your initial statements and questions around that list. Bring up each subject before the prospect does. The fact that you are bringing their concerns to the table before they do tells them you understand where they are coming from. Also the fact that you organized theses question ahead of time means you already have the answers. This keeps you from being surprised as well.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5291542].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Websensei
    thanks for this, cold calling is really my weakness, hope I improve it
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5294636].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
      Originally Posted by Websensei View Post

      thanks for this, cold calling is really my weakness, hope I improve it
      If you take the time on this subject it can become your greatest strength. I spent some time selling automobiles during those years I found my weakness was truck knowledge.


      I began to ask questions until I had a full understanding of how trucks are built and the inner workings of a truck. Two years later I entered and won a walk around competition on trucks in the south region of the US, aka truck country.


      When I did this I had a little fear of actually being able to learn about trucks properly. To date I cannot find many who can match my knowledge of trucks. I then began to sell almost every truck person who came on the lot.


      Ironically, my friend I have received several compliments from people who have owned trucks their entire lives on my knowledge and I have yet to own a truck for myself.


      That was some time ago but lesson learned is you can indeed make this your strength to one day even teaching it to others.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5351138].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author free2bme
    @Michael Bucker - I love the idea of recording the presentation! It will
    definitely assist us in getting feedback on what is or isn't working and
    then eventually "perfecting" our presentation along the way!

    Loving the advice guys, thank you so much!

    ~Jean~
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5294675].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Sue Bruce
      Cold calling in person is terrifying for some. I managed a team selling security systems and the guy who had the distributorship was hiring everyone who applied. We had a single mom who desperately needed the money but was physically ill when we parked the van and gave her a partner to work with who was experienced.

      You have to be able to look at it like it's a challenge. The same as applying for a job, writing an exam, making a good impression.

      If they're qualified by phone it's so much easier when you're starting.

      A point that I don't see mentioned whenever cold calling is discussed is that is that you have to be able to get yourself psyched up. It's lonely working on your own.

      You need enough rest to be cheerful and feel on top of your game. After years in sales , it's interesting to see how different personalities get ready to sell.

      I've seen guys drink 3 or 4 coffee before they're ready to sell. I've seen the team meeting every day that serves as a pep talk and an "upper".

      The bottom line is that those who are successful can motivate themselves.

      They've experimented and have found a ritual that works for them. They are the superstars.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5298793].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
        Originally Posted by Sue Bruce View Post

        Cold calling in person is terrifying for some. I managed a team selling security systems and the guy who had the distributorship was hiring everyone who applied. We had a single mom who desperately needed the money but was physically ill when we parked the van and gave her a partner to work with who was experienced.

        You have to be able to look at it like it's a challenge. The same as applying for a job, writing an exam, making a good impression.

        If they're qualified by phone it's so much easier when you're starting.

        A point that I don't see mentioned whenever cold calling is discussed is that is that you have to be able to get yourself psyched up. It's lonely working on your own.

        You need enough rest to be cheerful and feel on top of your game. After years in sales , it's interesting to see how different personalities get ready to sell.

        I've seen guys drink 3 or 4 coffee before they're ready to sell. I've seen the team meeting every day that serves as a pep talk and an "upper".

        The bottom line is that those who are successful can motivate themselves.

        They've experimented and have found a ritual that works for them. They are the superstars.


        Though cold calling can be taught to anyone not everyone is willing to be taught, mostly out of fear. I have trained over 1,000 sales people over the last 10 years or so, and yes they all have their own patterns. Some are indeed to get them ready to sell, while others have created these habits out of fear of selling. We must make sure we are not the latter of the two.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5309488].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
      Originally Posted by free2bme View Post

      @Michael Bucker - I love the idea of recording the presentation! It will
      definitely assist us in getting feedback on what is or isn't working and
      then eventually "perfecting" our presentation along the way!

      Loving the advice guys, thank you so much!

      ~Jean~

      You are welcome Jean, I actually used this method when I first got into sales and was serious about making changes. It is very affective as you will find.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5304625].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author amarketing
    Michael, you mentioned several times to record conversations.

    Whether in person or on the phone, isn't it against the law to record a conversation without notifying the other party? I know sometimes on the phone I hear "this call is being recorded for "quality control purposes." Is this just a nicety, or is it required by law to notify the other person? Does it really matter if you're just using the recording for private purposes?

    Thanks for clarifying.
    Signature
    10 ORIGINAL PLR ARTICLES!
    HEALTH * FITNESS * DIET
    Each Article is 300+ to 500+ (MOSTLY 500+) WORDS
    **** -----> Only Selling This Pack to 4 PEOPLE <----- ****
    Only $80 PER PACK ...That's $8 an article! PM Me Before They're GONE!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5318684].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
      Originally Posted by amarketing View Post

      Michael, you mentioned several times to record conversations.

      Whether in person or on the phone, isn't it against the law to record a conversation without notifying the other party? I know sometimes on the phone I hear "this call is being recorded for "quality control purposes." Is this just a nicety, or is it required by law to notify the other person? Does it really matter if you're just using the recording for private purposes?

      Thanks for clarifying.

      I believe the reason for the law is to protect an individual from you using their info publically in any nature. If you are using it for your own purpose with no other person involved it would be the same as just memorizing everything that was said in a phone call.

      You are not using it to market the person info to others or to use it legally against them. I am not quoting law. I am telling my understanding of the reason behind telling someone you are recording them
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5328015].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author HypeText
      Originally Posted by amarketing View Post

      Michael, you mentioned several times to record conversations.

      Whether in person or on the phone, isn't it against the law to record a conversation without notifying the other party? I know sometimes on the phone I hear "this call is being recorded for "quality control purposes." Is this just a nicety, or is it required by law to notify the other person? Does it really matter if you're just using the recording for private purposes?

      Thanks for clarifying.
      Recording a Telephone conversation without consent of the party being recorded is a violation of Federal Wiretapping Laws.

      An Announcement notifying the caller that they are to be recorded is required by law and gives the Caller/Callee the option to hang up if they do not agree.
      Signature
      (916) 520-HYPE (4973)
      Local & Mobile Marketing Solutions
      $0 Setup & $99/mnth Private Label Reseller Accts
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5369036].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author vndnbrgj
        Originally Posted by HypeText View Post

        Recording a Telephone conversation without consent of the party being recorded is a violation of Federal Wiretapping Laws.

        An Announcement notifying the caller that they are to be recorded is required by law and gives the Caller/Callee the option to hang up if they do not agree.
        This thread is for DOOR TO DOOR.... as the title suggests.
        You post refers to recording a "telephone" conversation.

        This doesn't apply when you walk into a business with a recorder in your pocket.
        Signature
        Life Begins At The End Of Your Comfort Zone
        - Neale Donald Wilson -
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5369430].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author HypeText
          Originally Posted by vndnbrgj View Post

          This thread is for DOOR TO DOOR.... as the title suggests.
          You post refers to recording a "telephone" conversation.

          This doesn't apply when you walk into a business with a recorder in your pocket.
          In the post I was replying to, which was quoted, amarketing specifically referred to telephone conversations...

          "Whether in person or on the phone, isn't it against the law to record a conversation without notifying the other party? I know sometimes on the phone I hear "this call is being recorded for "quality control purposes." Is this just a nicety, or is it required by law to notify the other person? Does it really matter if you're just using the recording for private purposes?"

          Hence my reference to a telephone conversation.

          And by the way...38 states have laws regarding what is referred to as "Eavesdropping" where taping of oral conversations requires consent unless it is for Law Enforcement Purposes. It is still something to be treated with great care.

          Here is an Article from the NY Times citing two examples of seemingly innocent audio recordings made that now have those two people facing charges that could land them in prison for 15 yrs.

          http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/23/us...pagewanted=all
          Signature
          (916) 520-HYPE (4973)
          Local & Mobile Marketing Solutions
          $0 Setup & $99/mnth Private Label Reseller Accts
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5369569].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author amarketing
            Originally Posted by HypeText View Post

            In the post I was replying to, which was quoted, amarketing specifically referred to telephone conversations...

            "Whether in person or on the phone, isn't it against the law to record a conversation without notifying the other party? I know sometimes on the phone I hear "this call is being recorded for "quality control purposes." Is this just a nicety, or is it required by law to notify the other person? Does it really matter if you're just using the recording for private purposes?"

            Hence my reference to a telephone conversation.

            And by the way...38 states have laws regarding what is referred to as "Eavesdropping" where taping of oral conversations requires consent unless it is for Law Enforcement Purposes. It is still something to be treated with great care.

            Here is an Article from the NY Times citing two examples of seemingly innocent audio recordings made that now have those two people facing charges that could land them in prison for 15 yrs.

            http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/23/us...pagewanted=all

            Thanks a lot for offering that insightful information!

            I guess that it's a much better option to just improve your memory and record things that way
            Signature
            10 ORIGINAL PLR ARTICLES!
            HEALTH * FITNESS * DIET
            Each Article is 300+ to 500+ (MOSTLY 500+) WORDS
            **** -----> Only Selling This Pack to 4 PEOPLE <----- ****
            Only $80 PER PACK ...That's $8 an article! PM Me Before They're GONE!
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5378247].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
    I'm going to be as blunt as possible about this topic and why I know it can be very effective.

    The current situation is as follows when it comes to marketing our services.

    99.999% of every one marketing Google Places or any other service that relates to what a brick and mortar company could use is using the following methods or combination of methods to reach prospects.

    Now don't get me wrong before I mention these, there is nothing wrong with them.

    1. Direct emailing or list building.
    2. Telemarketing directly.
    3. Attraction marketing.

    Now here's the problem and I've mentioned this in other threads.

    You have to be a SUPERSTAR in these methods to rise above the noise and get noticed.
    Why do I say noise? The noise is the same delivery method every one else is using to try and get the prospects attention!

    I keep saying, If one will take the time to just go out and talk to people in person and take the lumps of rejection I know for a FACT that they'll start getting clients.

    The first thing you've done is PROVE your really local, and you've set yourself apart from every one else by taking the time to go in and meet the owner.

    Large companies like ReachLocal don't do it any other way and for good reason. IT WORKS! They are a multimillion dollar company and their services SUCK!

    So guys, read these threads on selling face to face and get off your butts and go out and just do it. You are going to get rejected NO MATTER what venue you choose to use to approach your prospects but at least with going out and meeting people your showing them something different then the TONS of spam they get in their email boxes or phone voice message boxes.
    Signature
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5351427].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
      Originally Posted by Rus Sells View Post

      I'm going to be as blunt as possible about this topic and why I know it can be very effective.

      The current situation is as follows when it comes to marketing our services.

      99.999% of every one marketing Google Places or any other service that relates to what a brick and mortar company could use is using the following methods or combination of methods to reach prospects.

      Now don't get me wrong before I mention these, there is nothing wrong with them.

      1. Direct emailing or list building.
      2. Telemarketing directly.
      3. Attraction marketing.

      Now here's the problem and I've mentioned this in other threads.

      You have to be a SUPERSTAR in these methods to rise above the noise and get noticed.
      Why do I say noise? The noise is the same delivery method every one else is using to try and get the prospects attention!

      I keep saying, If one will take the time to just go out and talk to people in person and take the lumps of rejection I know for a FACT that they'll start getting clients.

      The first thing you've done is PROVE your really local, and you've set yourself apart from every one else by taking the time to go in and meet the owner.

      Large companies like ReachLocal don't do it any other way and for good reason. IT WORKS! They are a multimillion dollar company and their services SUCK!

      So guys, read these threads on selling face to face and get off your butts and go out and just do it. You are going to get rejected NO MATTER what venue you choose to use to approach your prospects but at least with going out and meeting people your showing them something different then the TONS of spam they get in their email boxes or phone voice message boxes.
      Originally Posted by BusinessGuru View Post

      Personally, I would have to say that I prefer cold calling to approaching friends and family. I have found that when I attempted to get family involved in by business endeavors it was an uphill battle.

      However, once I decided to test out the cold market, my business took off. However, if there is anything I can advise when dealing with the cold market are these following points.

      1. Don't try to convince or sell; simply present the information and let the prospect reach their own conclusion.

      2. Never, ever give your power away. Either remain on higher ground or see the prospect as an equal, but never lower yourself to make a sale.

      3. You must understand the odds of the game you intend to play. It's simply like rolling a dice. If it takes you 20 times to roll a seven, you now know your odds, and with this you can defeat your competition. It's exactly the same with the cold market.
      @businessguru I like the steps and especially number three. I would add turn 20 rolls into a possible 20 minutes. Do not feel pressure of a loss if you have not closed in the first 5 minutes. If one understands that often the potential client is not close until minute 20 there is not pressure in the most of the presentation.

      @ russ Fellow warrior, I do believe we may have graduated from the same school of sales. Your truths are very much that... "Truths".

      Note: I do support all forms of marketing regardless of this thread. This is my helping others in this field of marketing.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5351811].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author aw6334
    There is some great information on this thread. I used to do a lot of cold calling, and intend to go back to it soon, so it's always good to read of other people's techniques to remind me how to do it well!

    I've had experience in telemarketing (I was 18, and awful at it), direct door to door sales, shopping centre selling, recruiting Avon representatives, as well as years in market research, either door to door or in the street.

    The main thing to remember for anyone who is scared about cold calling is to see it as a game - you never know who you are going to get behind that door and what they are going to say - and that's interesting! And fun to have to think on your feet and learn how to respond. but don't beat yourself up if you don't respond in the way that you think you should - there's always next time.

    And always remember that a No just means that they are not interested in your product or service at this time - don't take No's personally, or they will destroy your self-confidence. Even the best sales people receive rejections.

    I like the idea of taping conversations - but for a complete beginner to cold calling it might have a detrimental effect: if they hear themselves stuttering and unable to answer questions or deal with objections coherently and rationally it could make their self confidence plummet.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5351438].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author amarketing
    Michael, I stay out of the Offline section for a week, and come back to find that you have started 2 more great threads! I'll have to take some time out to get caught-up on all of the great information.
    Signature
    10 ORIGINAL PLR ARTICLES!
    HEALTH * FITNESS * DIET
    Each Article is 300+ to 500+ (MOSTLY 500+) WORDS
    **** -----> Only Selling This Pack to 4 PEOPLE <----- ****
    Only $80 PER PACK ...That's $8 an article! PM Me Before They're GONE!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5368878].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author paramongoose
    Man, I did cold calling for about 10 months, made some good money with it. If you have a product that is really general and that everyone needs than it works very well, I made about 5 sales average per day promoting mot packages in the UK.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5371298].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
      Originally Posted by honestbizpro View Post

      I can remember my days cold calling beauty salons with a line of all natural products I helped develop. What I would do is walk in the door with a sample of the product and let one of the customers smell it. It smelled like pineapple or pina colada. The customer would always smile and say wow what is that?

      That is when I knew I had the hair stylist attention and I would just leave a sample that would turn into monthly recurring orders from that day.

      I was walking in the front door and making a sale thru the back door..so to speak.
      Originally Posted by paramongoose View Post

      Man, I did cold calling for about 10 months, made some good money with it. If you have a product that is really general and that everyone needs than it works very well, I made about 5 sales average per day promoting mot packages in the UK.

      I am glad more actual cold callers have jumped on this thread. It is a niche that once you learn can make you a lot of money. I am about to employ the services and train cold callers to pitch seminars for me. I am to the point of my public speaking and my in-house accounts that I need to give up high percentages to those who want to book seminars for me.

      It is well worth what I will be paying my cold callers in order to expand into other businesses I am getting involved in while maintaining my public speaking.

      My cold calling days are have taught me things one can not learn otherwise. I will always do some cold calling I simply must hand it over to others for the most part in order to give attention to other businesses my services are now being employed to.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5371996].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author amarketing
        Michael, have you found that it's better business sense to sell products/services that have re currying billing/sales? Like the member mentioned who sold to salons, one sale would create a flow of future orders. Even some of your speaking engagement sales reslut in recurring appearances it seems.

        To me, it looks like when you sell something that generates a continuous income stream, you are making it easier to "build on your sales." That is, if you make 100 sales for $100, you make $10K, but if each sale results in $100 per quarter, you're now making 40K from those sales (and some of that will carry over into the next year assuming some of the clients stay on)

        Am I right in my way of thinking on this?
        Signature
        10 ORIGINAL PLR ARTICLES!
        HEALTH * FITNESS * DIET
        Each Article is 300+ to 500+ (MOSTLY 500+) WORDS
        **** -----> Only Selling This Pack to 4 PEOPLE <----- ****
        Only $80 PER PACK ...That's $8 an article! PM Me Before They're GONE!
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5378272].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Michael Bucker
          Originally Posted by amarketing View Post

          Michael, have you found that it's better business sense to sell products/services that have re currying billing/sales? Like the member mentioned who sold to salons, one sale would create a flow of future orders. Even some of your speaking engagement sales reslut in recurring appearances it seems.

          To me, it looks like when you sell something that generates a continuous income stream, you are making it easier to "build on your sales." That is, if you make 100 sales for $100, you make $10K, but if each sale results in $100 per quarter, you're now making 40K from those sales (and some of that will carry over into the next year assuming some of the clients stay on)

          Am I right in my way of thinking on this?
          That is indeed the idea my friend with most of my speaking in seminars the end result is to close other accounts for a monthly visit into their place of business. As a matter of fact I closed a business yesterday for monthly services at $1,300 a month for one day a month of my services. It is lower than my normal rates for a day however there were special circumstances involved.

          However they came to one of my specking engagements some time ago and during my follow up found they needed more of my services and now I will be going in one day a month starting this Tuesday at $1,300 a day.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5378468].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author warrioradam
    great thread so true.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5381294].message }}
Avatar of Unregistered

Trending Topics