Client taking long time to reply?

16 replies
I've got a restaurant as a client and I originally contacted them offering a mobile website.

Basically whenever he says he will get back to me, they don't and I end up ringing him.

I know this is an important client and potentially wort a lot of money so I don't want to push him but I do want to get the deal closed so I can work more on getting clients.

Any ideas?
#client #long #reply #taking #time
  • Profile picture of the author aduttonater
    You can let him know that you offer is going to expire soon and that he needs to act fast. This is why you've been calling him so much.
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  • Profile picture of the author fandbworld
    Wouldn't call it a "client" yet if they didn't agree to anything. They could possibly be busy, and don't check their emails all the time.

    It is hard to keep contacting without seeming to desperate. I believe they had a thread about follow ups about a week ago, I will see if I can find it

    Edit: Found it http://www.warriorforum.com/offline-...desperate.html
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    • Profile picture of the author damasgate
      I think the main reason he considered a mobile site in the first place is perhaps some pain that you uncovered for him.

      After the call, the routine of running his business got him out of the urgency of wanting to get your service RIGHT now.

      Your job is to create that same pain and urgency for him and for that I would recommend an appointment.

      At the appointment I push for 50% on the spot because I want them to be serious about what I'm doing for them.
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  • Profile picture of the author shane_k
    Originally Posted by timgreen View Post

    I've got a restaurant as a client and I originally contacted them offering a mobile website.
    How long ago was your initial contact with this person?

    two days ago? a week? a month? 3 months or longer?

    Basically whenever he says he will get back to me, they don't and I end up ringing him.
    Looking at this tells me that he has told you that he will "get back to you" more than once, is this correct?


    I know this is an important client and potentially wort a lot of money so I don't want to push him but I do want to get the deal closed so I can work more on getting clients.

    Any ideas?
    If you have called him multiple times (more than 3), and each time his response to you was he will get back to you but hasn't, then that means he probably isn't interested.

    Yes you can try a technique like the one mentioned above where you tell them that you are taking the offer off the shelf, which technically is supposed to elicit urgency or scarcity, but if he isn't interested or never was interested, all you are going to elicit is relief - relief that you are finally going to stop calling him.

    You have a couple of choices.

    1) Drop this one and move on to finding other leads

    2) keep calling them and hope they change their mind

    3) learn from this and look up some sales books on how to create more urgency which you are definately lacking here.

    I would also look at the thread that was posted on here about "tie-downs"

    Tiedowns and urgency combined really help improve conversions.

    4) Track your contacts with business owners and sales that you make, and figure out how many contacts it takes you on average to make a sale.

    This way if you know that it takes you on average 4 contacts with a business owner, (eg, initial cold call, follow up call, meet in person, follow up meeting) before you make your sale, then you have an idea on how many times you can follow up with someone before you start wasting your and their time.

    So if it takes you 4 contacts on average, you will know then that following them up 7, 8, 9 or even more times is just a waste of time.

    This will also give you an idea of how many follow ups you can make before you start looking desperate or before they start seeing you as that annoying sales person.

    And this tracking how many contacts on average it takes before you make a sale concept also has productivity benefits

    It will allow you to spend less and less time chasing people who aren't interested and allow you to focus more of your time on those who are.

    When I learned this and started applying this I went from the bottom 3rd in my sales company to the top 3rd. Wish I could say I was first but I still had other sales skills to learn to get to that spot.

    Anyway, check out this book "High Efficiency Selling" by Stephan Schiffman

    He has a couple of great chapters on managing your leads and prospects list so you do spend more time on interested people and less time on those who have no interest.
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  • Profile picture of the author kellyyarnsbro
    Originally Posted by timgreen View Post

    I've got a restaurant as a client and I originally contacted them offering a mobile website.

    Basically whenever he says he will get back to me, they don't and I end up ringing him.

    I know this is an important client and potentially wort a lot of money so I don't want to push him but I do want to get the deal closed so I can work more on getting clients.

    Any ideas?
    Probably they really are not interested. So you have to convince them more in a sense that they'll find it interesting for them and they'll look for you.
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  • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
    I'd move on. They'll probably be disrespectful to you, and probably more loyal to price
    rather than you and your service. Demanding something for nothing as well.

    Also, never get hung up waiting for one prospect - more like suspect in this case - to come through. Keep the deal flow going with qualified prospects so you really can put that urgency into your presentations. Doing so will help you come from a position of strength so you won't be at the mercy of this One Guy's schedule and what he wants to pay you. Which will also help you come across stronger and more confident and more credible.

    Dan
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Tim; He already replied. The answer is "No". Please stop wasting your time following up on small deals. You have a far better chance at a sale with a new prospect.

      And you have one prospect? Young man, that's like eating one Cheerio.

      I wish you good luck in your next attempt.
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  • Profile picture of the author JerrickYeoh
    Delay show that he do not feel the important or likely toward a mobile website.
    You might share with him some report of case study that related to his field and making huge money or improve in service and marketing with the mobile website.

    Or you can simply design for him a easy interface and show him to make him keen with your design .
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  • Profile picture of the author Hesster
    I'm reminded of a video I saw on YouTube of someone ice fishing with one of those underwater cameras. A fish came right up to the guy's lure, nibbled on the end without the hook, then spit it out and left.

    Welcome to one of the joys of sales: people who show interest but won't commit. Sometimes it's just they aren't interested but they don't like saying "No" so they say anything they think will get you off the phone so they don't have to deal with you. I'd much rather hear a definite no than pick up one of these people.

    If you want to keep after him, put him on some kind of follow up program that doesn't take a lot of time and effort on your part. Mail him a postcard every few months or so, or ask him if it's OK to put him on your newsletter mailing list. But stop focusing on him, because it's obvious he's in no hurry to buy.
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  • Profile picture of the author denharsh
    Don't push him....
    Drop him an occasional Email (once in a week), with Subject reminder:
    This will make client feel that you are serious about work.. Don't try to push him a lot..else he will feel he is out of option..and in such cases client usually run...
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    • Profile picture of the author socialentry
      I know a guy who will follow up every 2 weeks at work, even if the prospect says some crap like `don`t ever call me again`(mind you, business only, you can get sued for doing B2C that way). He doesn't really introduce anything new, he just repitches them but it works for him.

      I wouldn`t follow up very often. I think past a certain pĂ´int, someone who will keep rescheduling is just too polite to say no.

      don`t rely on the prospect calling you back,because as soon as you let go of control, that's almost a guarantee he will politely tell you to **** off by not callin you at all.

      Instead:Say 'I promise I will do a follow-up in two weeks'

      And then when you DO follow up say:
      'As promised, I am calling you back to...'
      It establishes you as a thrustworthy person that keep his word.

      I think as long as you don`t do it more then once every 2 weeks, you`ll be fine.
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      • Profile picture of the author TurnKeyShane
        Prospects like this will rarely convert by follow ups after a certain point as mentioned. We have an email list we send out real content about online marketing 1-2 times a month to our current clients, contacts, and prospects like this. Stop calling and just add them to the email list so they still know who you are and know your the expert in the area if they decide to move forward in the future.
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  • Profile picture of the author Andy Fang
    Don't. If he doesn't reply he's probably not worth dealing business with, or simply just doesn't want it.
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  • Profile picture of the author hayfj2
    and when you agreed and confirmed the next time youd speak...

    ...did you ask him what could possibly stop or prevent him from making that appointment before you reaffirm it in writing to him?

    - food for thought.

    Maybe you can use that next time, and do follow up in wiriting after to confirm the next appointment.

    If you dont ask, they wont say, and if they do, then ensure you firm up in writing addressing any concerns they have

    hope that gets you thinking.

    regards


    Fraser
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    • Profile picture of the author ronr
      Put them on an email list and occasionally email them information tied to what you were offering (articles, videos, links to happy client's sites, etc.)

      That way you aren't chasing them, just staying in touch and you can esily send out to the emails list without taking much of your time.

      Ron
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  • Profile picture of the author DaniMc
    Sell to one of his competitors, get them results, and then mail him the case study with your phone number on the bottom.
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    Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.
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