Offline Marketing - Do I need degree? Should I do online first?

38 replies
Hey,

So offline marketing sounds a lot more appealing to me than online marketing. I would get to interact with a lot more people and it sounds more fun.

Should I go to school and get a marketing degree if I want to do offline?

Also, should I go through the hurdles of online marketing before going offline? I do know SEO and the basics of online but I am thinking about putting everything on hold for online and putting together a marketing plan to pitch to potential clients.

Also, are there any mentors I can hire online that do offline marketing?

Any answers would be very helpful.
#degree #marketing #offline #online
  • Profile picture of the author lgizzle
    Originally Posted by Seemore25101 View Post

    Hey,

    So offline marketing sounds a lot more appealing to me than online marketing. I would get to interact with a lot more people and it sounds more fun.

    Should I go to school and get a marketing degree if I want to do offline?

    Also, should I go through the hurdles of online marketing before going offline? I do know SEO and the basics of online but I am thinking about putting everything on hold for online and putting together a marketing plan to pitch to potential clients.

    Also, are there any mentors I can hire online that do offline marketing?

    Any answers would be very helpful.
    First and fir most, you definitely do not need a degree. In your case you have a slight advantage having been online and ready to take online strategies to an offline market. Most marketers I have read about doing this realize that the competition is a lot less fierce. That's a plus for what you are trying to do.

    You don't necessarily have to go through the online hurdles first in order to market offline. I think you are on the right track when you said "...putting together a marketing plan to pitch to potential clients." There you have it. Put together your plan and go for it.

    Unfortunately, I don't know of any mentors specifically for doing offline marketing. Sorry about that part.

    I will say this though, when it comes to offline marketing you'll most likely be marketing to your local businesses and etc. These "offline people" tend not to know online marketing strategies. That's why people who are online and take their online tactics to an offline market tend to hit it big.

    These companies and individuals tend to have no clue about what should be done. So if you do decide to pursue this (which you should if your passionate about it) just know that you have a slight edge and you can easily position yourself as someone they should listen to.

    I hope that helps you out.
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  • Profile picture of the author Seemore25101
    I do need a website. How does the following sound?

    jseymourmarketing.com
    or
    jsmarketing.com

    I want to do it on my own right now and eventually lead into hiring people working for me.
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    • Profile picture of the author lgizzle
      For some reason jsmarketing.com jumps out at me. It's also going to be more easy for your clients to remember and associate you with. It's catchy. I'd remember it. Heck, I remember it now. jsmarketing definitely sounds better
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  • Profile picture of the author Seemore25101
    als, should i be taking payments up front or after work is ready?
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    • Profile picture of the author lgizzle
      Originally Posted by Art of Marketing View Post

      SEO is about results....if you can show previous clients that is good leverage..maybe give a way a package or 2 in exchange for the testimonial.

      Offline business is used to spending money on advertising so getting an upfront payment is not that difficult if you can impress them.

      You can integrate ongoing monthly SEO as well.

      This niche is and will still be going strong for a long while. IMHO

      -Art
      Art has a point there. SEO won't be going away anytime soon. And like he said, offline businesses are conditioned to spend money on advertising so you stand a good chance to get money upfront and that's a great idea to give away a free package. You'd get the business hands down. Typically online, it's the norm to give something away for free in order to capture more business down the line. That's not so typical offline. That's your edge right. Those online strategies being done offline. You should have good success.
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      • Profile picture of the author Seemore25101
        Okay, awesome! Thanks guys!

        I know I said I will be doing it on my own at first but I realise I will need to outsource. Should I have my outsourced workers ready to start before I find a client or should I find my first client and then outsource?

        If I do find them before my first client, would I need to pay them before signing a client?
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  • Profile picture of the author lgizzle
    I think the way it is usually done is taking payments up front. I remember some time ago, me and this guy were going into real estate. We needed potential buyers for our homes. So we sat down and wrote out a short message to put on a yard sign with a call to action to call our toll free number. The results were amazing. We placed them over town and while at work people were calling us like crazy. For those signs we had to the company here in town up front. We paid first, then they made the signs. Definitely up front. It's standard protocol.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    Get very clear about what you're offering.

    Yes have your outsourcers set up before you start.

    You don't need a degree...you need a specific skillset and results you can deliver on.

    Start using the Search feature on this site and look for threads on how to run a business...you are going to have to learn how to make an invoice...prospect for clients...outsource effectively, and more...
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  • Profile picture of the author Seemore25101
    Alright. I want to go after a couple niches so I'm wondering, should I have different marketing packages depending on the niche?

    I've got a master package all made out but I'm thinking I shoukd edit it depending on each niche.

    If anyome wanted to add me on Skype and take a look at my packages to see if I offer too much as a newbie, it would help!
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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
      Originally Posted by Seemore25101 View Post

      Alright. I want to go after a couple niches so I'm wondering, should I have different marketing packages depending on the niche?

      I've got a master package all made out but I'm thinking I shoukd edit it depending on each niche.

      If anyome wanted to add me on Skype and take a look at my packages to see if I offer too much as a newbie, it would help!
      Absolutely you should tailor your marketing to the niche. It takes a little more time, but it's worth it. You need to speak to the problems people are experiencing in that niche.

      If you had a problem with the pipes draining water away from your home and into your yard being blocked...would you be more interested in the brochure that talks about fixing that specific problem, or just home plumbing in general?
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  • Profile picture of the author Moneymaker2012
    You don't need a degree, you need a good course for it, to be perfect you need to link with the people who are in this business and learn from there experience.
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    • Profile picture of the author Seemore25101
      Originally Posted by Moneymaker2012 View Post

      You don't need a degree, you need a good course for it, to be perfect you need to link with the people who are in this business and learn from there experience.
      Do you know of any really good courses or WSO's? I've bought two which both of them have very good content inside but I'm looking for one that can help me with starting up.
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  • Profile picture of the author bawls
    All you need is balls, brains, and uncanny problem solving skills.
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  • Profile picture of the author benbro
    Please dont go out and get a degree just to do offline marketing, my friend. Take it from me, the guy who did just what you're asking - only to find that much of what I learned in school was useless to me after two years.

    In fact, this question reminds me of the thread I just wrote about my observations as a full-time offliner.

    See, what you have to face down if you're going to do this is all those thoughts that tell you that you need to do something else before you become an offliner. No you don't.

    And I promise you that once you REALLY put yourself out there and just start talking to business owners, hearing their problems and solving them that the picture will become so clear you'll wonder why you even considered going to school for online marketing.
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  • Profile picture of the author Seemore25101
    Would anyone recommend I team up with somebody before going out and finding leads? Or is it better if I start the journey solo first?
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  • Profile picture of the author benbro
    I'd recommend starting out on your own first so that you can learn the lay of the land and figure out what you're good at and where you're deficient and then you can figure out if you want to jv or outsource.
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    • Profile picture of the author Seemore25101
      Originally Posted by benbro View Post

      I'd recommend starting out on your own first so that you can learn the lay of the land and figure out what you're good at and where you're deficient and then you can figure out if you want to jv or outsource.
      The thing is I'm no good at web design so I'd need to outsource that and I havent done link building myself for SEO, I can do the keyword research and implement the keywords into the website. I want to focus on getting clients and working with them one on one and managing my team when I'm not with clients. Also, I would be focusing on the offline portions such as promotions and coupons and such while my team does all the online portions.

      I am a manager now so I have experience with managing. I just need to learn how to manage a team online instead of in a building together.
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  • Profile picture of the author benbro
    Got it, in that case...There's a fellow on the forum named Dexx. He has a wso called passive business profits that talks about that very thing. Given what you said, you should check it out.

    I'm going back over it a second time now myself. Hope that helps!
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    • Profile picture of the author Seemore25101
      Originally Posted by benbro View Post

      Got it, in that case...There's a fellow on the forum named Dexx. He has a wso called passive business profits that talks about that very thing. Given what you said, you should check it out.

      I'm going back over it a second time now myself. Hope that helps!
      I bought the WSO! I hope it helps! Thank you!
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      • Profile picture of the author benbro
        No problem, I'm sure it will help as it breaks the outsourcing piece down into bite sized chunks and surely delivers the type of info that will have you thinking to yourself, "I never thought of that before" or "Wow, this is exactly the type of information I was looking for...wish I would have found it sooner"



        Anyhow, please let us know if you have more questions. And please remember to share your progress. Thanks!
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        • Profile picture of the author Seemore25101
          Originally Posted by benbro View Post

          No problem, I'm sure it will help as it breaks the outsourcing piece down into bite sized chunks and surely delivers the type of info that will have you thinking to yourself, "I never thought of that before" or "Wow, this is exactly the type of information I was looking for...wish I would have found it sooner"



          Anyhow, please let us know if you have more questions. And please remember to share your progress. Thanks!
          I took a quick look at the first PDF today and will have to really dig into the product tonight after work!

          I was wondering one more thing, should I just get right out there and find my first client or should I have my logo and business cards printed out first?

          Also, should I hire a lwayer to write up contracts for me? I was thinking of offering people contracts in three month, six month and twelve month portions... six months would give clients a 5% discount and twelve would give them a 10% discount.
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          • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
            Originally Posted by Seemore25101 View Post

            I took a quick look at the first PDF today and will have to really dig into the product tonight after work!

            I was wondering one more thing, should I just get right out there and find my first client or should I have my logo and business cards printed out first?

            Also, should I hire a lwayer to write up contracts for me? I was thinking of offering people contracts in three month, six month and twelve month portions... six months would give clients a 5% discount and twelve would give them a 10% discount.
            You do not need a lawyer for contracts.

            I second the recommendation on Dexx's products. I've bought a couple myself. Systemize your business like he shows you.

            Outsource/sub what you cannot do yourself. Don't get a JV partner because you cannot control what they do...and if they turn out to be unreliable, you are in big trouble.
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            • Profile picture of the author Seemore25101
              Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

              You do not need a lawyer for contracts.

              I second the recommendation on Dexx's products. I've bought a couple myself. Systemize your business like he shows you.

              Outsource/sub what you cannot do yourself. Don't get a JV partner because you cannot control what they do...and if they turn out to be unreliable, you are in big trouble.
              How else do I do a contract, can I just write it up myself? I have some contract forms from Business in a box or something like that. Do they work just as well as one written by a lawyer?

              If I do contracts based on a year or so, should I include a clause about cancellation fees?
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              • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
                Originally Posted by Seemore25101 View Post

                How else do I do a contract, can I just write it up myself? I have some contract forms from Business in a box or something like that. Do they work just as well as one written by a lawyer?

                If I do contracts based on a year or so, should I include a clause about cancellation fees?
                Most people dislike contracts. They are a barrier to selling.

                If you continue to get good results for a client, they'll stick with you.

                For copywriting work, I use a scope of work or MOU, which we both sign off on before starting...but for ongoing training it's month-to-month. You probably know from the cell phone commercials that people don't like feeling trapped, and ditching the contract idea is an effective way of going about it.
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                • Profile picture of the author buysocialmedia1
                  Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

                  Most people dislike contracts. They are a barrier to selling.

                  If you continue to get good results for a client, they'll stick with you.

                  For copywriting work, I use a scope of work or MOU, which we both sign off on before starting...but for ongoing training it's month-to-month. You probably know from the cell phone commercials that people don't like feeling trapped, and ditching the contract idea is an effective way of going about it.
                  It really depends on what type of clients you are aiming at. Some clients, generally the bigger and more established ones, would expect you to have contracts and invoices etc as a standard thing. But other businesses (mainly small businesses and start ups) might feel trapped by contracts or might prefer something more informal. So its something that has to be considered for each case.

                  But a contract that states exactly what work is going to be done and in what conditions (i.e. timescales etc..) is essential. It protects both parties in the case that anything goes wrong. Just do a quick search on google for 'web design contract' and you should fine something that suits your needs
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  • Profile picture of the author Eddie Spangler
    The best degree is from the school of Hard Knocks.

    Enroll by making some calls and talking to people and sell something super simple that everyone needs like business cards or printing services.

    I will tell you how one of the most successful business people in this area started her business 5 years ago.

    She simply walked into businesses and asked
    "Do you need any help marketing your business?"

    Today, she is one of the most respected business people in the area

    I guaranfkingtee you that anyone who is willing to go door to door and
    ask this will have more business than they can handle before long.
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  • Profile picture of the author socialentry
    Took a business class in uni as an elective

    Worse 500 bucks I have spent ever.

    In college, I also had a marketing class, it was a waste of time full of corporate speak but at least I only spent 30 bucks on the manual.

    It can open doors. Some marketing or business degree is pretty much required in most of the finance industry but for me it's just an expensive hoop to jump through.
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  • Profile picture of the author bikramksingh
    Originally Posted by Seemore25101 View Post

    Hey,

    So offline marketing sounds a lot more appealing to me than online marketing. I would get to interact with a lot more people and it sounds more fun.

    Should I go to school and get a marketing degree if I want to do offline?

    Also, should I go through the hurdles of online marketing before going offline? I do know SEO and the basics of online but I am thinking about putting everything on hold for online and putting together a marketing plan to pitch to potential clients.

    Also, are there any mentors I can hire online that do offline marketing?

    Any answers would be very helpful.
    You may not need a degree to do offline marketing, if you want to do it for your company, but you should have a degree if you wish to get hired by a firm, as there are lot many people going after that kind of job.

    And regardless of type of offline marketing you want to do, I'll recommend getting some primers in Segmentation, positioning, branding, etc. understanding of concepts like these are absolutely necessary for doing any kind of marketing (offline or online). If you do not mind reading fat books than I will recommend you to read the following:

    Marketing Management by Philip Kotler (this should be considered as a must-read)

    Branding books by David Aaker. There are many more writers, but books by these two guys ar absolute must.

    In case you need a compilation of notes on marketing then PM me your mail ID, and I shall send you the notes I prepared during my MBA. That will be a good start.
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  • Profile picture of the author Arzak
    Getting a degree prepares you to work for someone else and not yourself.
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  • Not to put a wrench in your spokes, Man, as I really do hate to be a downer, but it seems like you're asking the forum to make a decision for you on every single small step of your business.

    Should I do this...or this? Should I do this...or this...? etc. Many of these are basic questions every business owner faces at some point and it just comes down to weighing the options.

    One of the most valuable talents a businessperson can and should have is the initiative to make decisions and solve problems on his or her own. In fact, it's pretty much a necessity. I understand the need to ask questions and get second opinions on certain issues - this is what networking on forums like this is about - but when you need it every step of the way, it's a bit alarming...

    I highly suggest cultivating the ability to make hard, educated decisions now because it's not a skill you'll want to scramble for when clients, employees, and profits are depending on you to do it. Start from the bottom, one step at a time, I say. There's a ton of info on most of the questions you've asked already out there if you just dig around, and the answer to most of those is no one's choice but your own.

    Best of luck with your business, and I admire your enthusiasm, but I just felt that in this particular instance it needed saying...
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    • Profile picture of the author Seemore25101
      Originally Posted by Superior Content Creation View Post

      Not to put a wrench in your spokes, Man, as I really do hate to be a downer, but it seems like you're asking the forum to make a decision for you on every single small step of your business.

      Should I do this...or this? Should I do this...or this...? etc. Many of these are basic questions every business owner faces at some point and it just comes down to weighing the options.

      One of the most valuable talents a businessperson can and should have is the initiative to make decisions and solve problems on his or her own. In fact, it's pretty much a necessity. I understand the need to ask questions and get second opinions on certain issues - this is what networking on forums like this is about - but when you need it every step of the way, it's a bit alarming...

      I highly suggest cultivating the ability to make hard, educated decisions now because it's not a skill you'll want to scramble for when clients, employees, and profits are depending on you to do it. Start from the bottom, one step at a time, I say. There's a ton of info on most of the questions you've asked already out there if you just dig around, and the answer to most of those is no one's choice but your own.

      Best of luck with your business, and I admire your enthusiasm, but I just felt that in this particular instance it needed saying...
      Okay. Thank you for that. You do make a lot of sense when I think about it, it's so new to me but you're right. I need to make the decisions.
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      • Originally Posted by Seemore25101 View Post

        Okay. Thank you for that. You do make a lot of sense when I think about it, it's so new to me but you're right. I need to make the decisions.
        No problem, and thanks for not getting defensive.

        What I would suggest if the business model is really that new to you is perhaps pick up 2-3, maybe even more, REPUTABLE products or books on running a business of this nature and read them from start to finish, taking notes. Then you'll have some solid, balanced advice on some of the aspects you're unsure about and a general idea of how things work.

        After that maybe you'll feel a bit more confident making these decisions on your own.

        If I may, even business books off Amazon could be a big help in putting something like this together. "Million-Dollar Consulting" by Alan Weiss is one that comes to mind.
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        • Profile picture of the author Seemore25101
          Originally Posted by Superior Content Creation View Post

          No problem, and thanks for not getting defensive.

          What I would suggest if the business model is really that new to you is perhaps pick up 2-3, maybe even more, REPUTABLE products or books on running a business of this nature and read them from start to finish, taking notes. Then you'll have some solid, balanced advice on some of the aspects you're unsure about and a general idea of how things works.

          After that maybe you'll feel a bit more confident making these decisions on your own.

          If I may, even books off Amazon could be a big help in putting a business like this together. "Million-Dollar Consulting" by Alan Weiss is one that comes to mind.

          Alright, I've now got three books recommended to me so I'll have to sit down and take a look at the three once I get them!
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  • Profile picture of the author DaniMc
    You don't need to learn SEO or webdesign or any of the other things you mention.

    You need to learn how to SELL them, and how to manage the projects. You need to know enough about them to advise and converse about them.

    Selling is the lynchpin to your success. It mostly comes down to motivation and persistence.

    I can tell you right now - and I guarantee you that I am right - this will take 10 times more effort than you are planning for right now. So, whatever you plan to do at this moment to bring in business, multiply it by 10 and do THAT much effort. Almost nobody, myself included, correctly estimates the amount of work required to start a business. You might fall short of the 10x amount of effort you plan, but it will still be much more than the 1x you are thinking of doing now.

    Sure, get some WSO's, but don't make that your learning goal. This is not something you learn once. You need to get in the habit on constantly absorbing books and business material. I have been reading 3-4 books a week for several years now. I read several business magazines. I am absolutely obsessed with business and I believe having an OBSESSION is the way to success.

    The most successful CEO's, on average, read 60 books per year. So, forget about asking for recommendations - READ THEM ALL.

    Don't get wrapped up in endlessly designing your site and creating material and researching and blah, blah, blah. You could work 80 hours per week for the next two years and not make any money. The goal isn't to work, the goal is to make money. You do that by selling. My website, has a nice design, but the buttons don't go anywhere. I just don't have time to finish it because I am much more concerned about getting more customers than about my website. In fact, I have not had even one prospect reference my website. It just isn't important.

    In short, make selling and learning your #1 and #2 priorities. Almost everything else is fluff.
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  • Profile picture of the author onthebox
    Originally Posted by Seemore25101 View Post

    Hey,

    So offline marketing sounds a lot more appealing to me than online marketing. I would get to interact with a lot more people and it sounds more fun.

    Should I go to school and get a marketing degree if I want to do offline?

    Also, should I go through the hurdles of online marketing before going offline? I do know SEO and the basics of online but I am thinking about putting everything on hold for online and putting together a marketing plan to pitch to potential clients.

    Also, are there any mentors I can hire online that do offline marketing?

    Any answers would be very helpful.
    Sounds like you have the mindset of an Offline Marketer - because it is ALL about building relationships with people who want to buy your products and services. The WF is full of marketers trying to find ways of selling offline without any contact with the people they want to sell to. There are hundreds of WSO's that claim to show you how to do this - but most go for the "scatter gun" approach - send out hundreds of "targeted" emails, handouts, mail shots, video examples etc and you may get a 1% or 2% return.

    Reality - this take a lot of time and effort with poor results. Seems like you don't have any problem meeting people - that's the first step.

    Here's what I do:

    1. Join local Chamber of Commerce, BNI or Business Network.
    Go to the meetings, join in, interact with other business owners. They are all there to network their business ideas. So you already have a forum for talking about what you can offer. Most networking groups give new members an opportunity to introduce their business. Prepare a 3 minute presentation. Most of all, keep building relationships through networking events and keep on talking about your business with them. This works!

    2. I organise seminars that will be of interest to local business owners and invite them along for free. Do this through Chamber of Commerce and BNI membership. If you have a hot topic that will solve problems for local business owners, they will come. Provide great coffee - for free!

    3. At the end of your free seminar, get them to complete one of your "get Connected" cards to claim their free one on one consultation with you.

    Bingo! You now have one on one access to huge money making potential with local business owners.

    I do this myself - it works!

    Join local business networks
    Build relationships
    Run free local seminars
    Offer free one on one consultations
    Bank the checks!

    Hope this helps
    Steve
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    Steve Flashman works on and offline as a Marketing Consultant with a unique edge! He is a published author & recording artist, broadcaster & communications expert and he runs a charity working in the developing world. He also bought a Double Decker Bus on Ebay, runs a number of Community Choirs and leads a church and community project. http://www.businessexpresscoaching.com

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  • Profile picture of the author dean mcevoy
    I think you should do a degree. you have no idea what life will throw at you in 5,10, 15 years and a degree in a hard subject, with good grades, will stand you in good stead.

    as for offline - do it as well!! you will have at least 12 hours a week, especially in first 2 years, more then enough for a few clients. if it takes off, brilliant! if it does well but not so well that you can live off the proceeds, it makes a great addition to a CV. if it fails, its no biggie
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    hey everyone
    feel free to give me a PM, even if its just to say hi. i always reply back, accept freind requests ect.

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