A $3600 sale or a waste of time?

by yixar
12 replies
So I've been using LinkedIn for prospecting but it hasn't really worked. Until last Wednesday, I get a reply from a guy interested in getting leads for his business. So I call him up and we talk. Long story short, we agree on a monthly cost of $3600 for lead generation services (he wants a lot). He tells me he'll pay on Friday.

Friday comes, he asks me to give him a call so I do, then he asks me if he pays Friday, how soon he can get set up. I tell him and he goes "Awesome, I'll pay later when I'm free."

It's now Monday and still nothing. I sent him a follow up email on Friday night and this morning. I also tried calling him twice on his cell between this morning and now and I called his business number and got the receptionist who says he's not there but I am guessing he is because she asked who I was then asked to hold, only to come back saying he wasn't around.

What I want to know is what I should do moving forward; should I keep following up every couple of days or so OR should I forget him and move on?

Your input is greatly appreciated but if your not going to be helpful, please don't bother posting.
#$3600 #sale #time #waste
  • Profile picture of the author kemdev
    Most people are going to tell you to move on. I think that advice is half-right.

    Yes, move on. This most likely isn't a sale.

    BUT... I'd still follow up. I'm assuming you have the time (what's it take, 5 minutes?) and there's nothing bad that could come of it. Like I said, it's not a sale, so you shouldn't be treating it like one. I come by some of my sales this way... someone isn't ready to pull the trigger but buys two, three weeks down the road. But these are basically free-sales and shouldn't be counted on. So treat this as a 'no' for now.

    I'd send an email asking for a simple yes or no. I might call back and ask when he's generally available, and try once a week until it gets really cold. You're generally not going to make the sale and already seem desperate by now, but like I said I've made some sales this way, and the 15 or so minutes it costs you each month is well worth the effort.

    Side question: monthly price seems extremely aggressive. Have you done projects like this before? What's included in the cost, and does the prospect know this?
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    • Profile picture of the author yixar
      Originally Posted by kemdev View Post

      Most people are going to tell you to move on. I think that advice is half-right.

      Yes, move on. This most likely isn't a sale.

      BUT... I'd still follow up. I'm assuming you have the time (what's it take, 5 minutes?) and there's nothing bad that could come of it. Like I said, it's not a sale, so you shouldn't be treating it like one. I come by some of my sales this way... someone isn't ready to pull the trigger but buys two, three weeks down the road. But these are basically free-sales and shouldn't be counted on. So treat this as a 'no' for now.

      I'd send an email asking for a simple yes or no. I might call back and ask when he's generally available, and try once a week until it gets really cold. You're generally not going to make the sale and already seem desperate by now, but like I said I've made some sales this way, and the 15 or so minutes it costs you each month is well worth the effort.

      Side question: monthly price seems extremely aggressive. Have you done projects like this before? What's included in the cost, and does the prospect know this?
      I used a value script (based on Jason's teachings) with him so that's the figure he derived at that he is willing to pay for what I will be bringing in for him. Yes, I've done this service before. Though for this prospect, I will have to do a bit more for him to achieve the desired results.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    Prospects always lie. Often this takes the form of withholding information. Maybe he's expecting money that hasn't come in yet. He's not going to tell you that, though.

    Give it a few days and then send a quick email to check. In the meantime, he might pay. He knows what he agreed to with you.
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  • Profile picture of the author aharrold
    Welcome to the world of sales, BS'ers and time-wasters. Keep in mind maybe he is busy or like Jason said needs to come up with the cash. I would keep pursuing the prospect, are you a quitter- you don't sound like you are
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  • Profile picture of the author yixar
    Thanks for the input guys. I'll follow up again later in the week and see how it goes. Will let you know how it turned out.
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  • Profile picture of the author shawnlebrun
    There's a fine line between seeming needy... and following up.

    I'll be honest, I've been doing service businesses for 13+ years... including copywriting, coaching, marketing advice, etc...

    And if there's one thing I can count on, it's that clients will say one thing and do something totally different.

    Oh, and one of the worst things I EVER used to do, after sending a proposal and getting someone say "Yes, I want to do it".... is to waste emotional energy on whether or not they will pay or hire me.

    Because when you're constantly worrying if people will hire you, it stresses you out, causes unnecessary frustration, and it's just not worth it.

    My thoughts these days... once I send a proposal with my best attempt, I let it go and not think about it again.

    Because to me, it's not worth spending emotional energy worrying whether someone will pay or hire me or not. Because when that happens, you're giving that person power over you. Don't give them that.

    so, send your proposal, have your chat, or whatever... and then let it go and let it be.

    sure, you can call or email to follow up, but I'm talking to free yourself emotionally from it.

    Do NOT waste emotional energy worrying about it, or stressing out... because it will be a long, long career if you do.

    Believe me, I used to... but after about a year of realizing what I was doing, I just stopped worrying. I sent my best proposal, or gave my best presentation on the phone, and gave them the steps to hire me.

    If I didn't hear back, I'd email or call again, maybe once, but I'd move on. If i had worried about the 3,000 or so proposals I've sent over the years, I would have gone nuts.

    Bottom line, don't appear too needy because that DOES drive prospects away.

    Oh, this thread may help you out a lot, it helped me with what Jason Leister wrote...

    http://www.warriorforum.com/copywrit...need-read.html
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    • Profile picture of the author AndrewCavanagh
      Originally Posted by shawnlebrun View Post

      There's a fine line between seeming needy... and following up.

      one of the worst things I EVER used to do, after sending a proposal and getting someone say "Yes, I want to do it".... is to waste emotional energy on whether or not they will pay or hire me.

      Because when you're constantly worrying if people will hire you, it stresses you out, causes unnecessary frustration, and it's just not worth it.
      So true.


      I absolutely think you should follow up.

      The real question you should be asking is HOW should you follow up.

      As has already been said you don't want to be seen as needy.

      I'd follow up like I would with any prospect...with useful information
      or ideas.

      I wouldn't be following up asking "when are you going to pay" over
      and over.

      That makes it seem like you need them more than they need you.

      Your mental problem here is you're seeing this PROSPECT as a
      $3,600 a month client who hasn't paid you yet instead of what
      he is...a prospect who seems to be excited about your services.

      They're not a client until AFTER they pay you.

      Following up with hot prospects is always good business but
      maintain the attitude and actions of someone who needs them
      a whole lot less than they need you.

      Kindest regards,
      Andrew Cavanagh
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  • Sometimes aggressive business people get ahead of themselves. They want to move fast and don't always think about the fact they need to pay for all their initiatives. He may have realized he didn't have the cash flow and didn't want to admit it. Give it some time and try again.
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  • Profile picture of the author dknyrob
    Like few other warriors mention I would say what does it take to just follow up via email or a quick call. However, I wouldn't totally depend on it. Just keep it coming!
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  • Profile picture of the author Andrew Davis
    I believe that this type of concern relates to how well you are doing in business.

    - If business is going great, lots of orders are coming in: Then you won't feel the anxiety of possibly losing a Client.

    - On the other hand. If business is slow, things are not going too well: You will begin to worry a lot about the idea of losing a potential Client.



    When I first started off, getting offline Clients, things were slow.
    I would slightly feel that type of anxiety the OP is describing.

    I followed up on my clients, but I gave them time.

    I would gauge their interest by the way the conversation went, their tone of interest and the urgency of how soon they needed my services.

    If they seemed very interested, I would follow up with a call in 1 week, to see how things are going.

    If they were somewhat interested, yet unsure, I gave them 2-4 weeks before following up.
    ...and so forth.


    As others have said, often the problem is that the Client is not ready to commit yet. Either they are too busy, things are not yet organized, or they are waiting on expected funds.

    These above issues usually happen when you go Looking for your Clients.

    These issues have mostly stopped for me, since now I let my Clients Find Me.



    Well now, business is going very well for me, so I have stopped following up on any clients at all, regardless of their interest level.

    Sometimes I get more orders than I can handle, so there is no reason for me to worry about losing a few clients who weren't very serious anyway.

    I still take notes of each client and our discussion, but I don't ever waste time wondering if they will return or not.

    As Shawn rightly said, it's not worth wasting your energy worrying over these things. There is nothing much you can do to make a Client decide to come back to you, after the initial discussion.

    The most you can do is follow up with a call as a reminder, that can help sometimes;
    but don't let the thought of your prospect clients run up and down in your mind.
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  • Profile picture of the author Huskerdarren
    What would it take to get a handful of leads that you could send his way? Maybe they would prime the pump?
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  • This is a great thread! I honestly think everybody gave great advice. The only thing I would really make you think about OP is to realize that if he just doesn't seem interested, then it is totally fine and you should move on. However, as long as you don't get a complete NO, then you should still pursue the business owner. You never know, he may just be the client you've been waiting for.
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