Client thinks I didn't charge enough.

14 replies
Hello everyone. I wanted to share a story with you guys about something a client said to me that made me think. I'm quite new to selling internet services. I started out with creating Wordpress websites, now I'm more into doing Pay Per Click Campaigns. That's just a little background about me.

So I basically created a website for a client and after I created the website, we got to the PPC campaign portion. I managed to sell the website for $500 and they absolutely loved it. When we got to the PPC part, I told my client that I charge a $100 monthly fee + 10% of the campaign. The response that my client gave me was shocking.

My client ended up asking me why I only charge $100. He ended up feeling bad that he was paying me so little for a PPC campaign. He told me "In the future, once we get the ball rolling, you can definitely charge me more, as long as it's reasonable." He also told me that I didn't seem like a "$100 a month type of guy." On top of that, he told me that he would pay me a bonus for every sale he makes through PPC.

Anyways, that's just my little story, hoping to inspire some fellow Warriors out there. Never underestimate the power of what you do and value the services you're capable of providing to others.
#charge #client #thinks
  • Profile picture of the author stevendbrady
    Oh, it's definitely true. I've had customers refuse our service because the low price point turned them off. They weren't looking for a bargain, they were looking for a knowledgeable group with a solid product. Our price didn't reflect that. So, we increased our rates. Never sell yourself short with a low price. It won't pay off in the end.

    Besides, you generally don't want the customers that are looking for a bargain. They're a pain in the rear.
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  • Profile picture of the author chg
    This happens a lot when people are starting out. You don't feel you're "worth" what you really are. Confidence will come with time and soon you'll be charging people exactly what you deserve and are worth and not blinking an eye. Along with this confidence comes more sales, it's an interesting cycle. At least that's how it's worked with me in the past.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
    Yups, I'm glad your client told you how they felt about your charges. I've preached on this forum for the last 3 years for people to raise their pricing, some do it but many don't. = |
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    "Head Trash" is what it is: limiting beliefs that make us settle for a level of income and circumstances.

    But most of us don't even know we have it.

    Once you start shining a light on and examining your head trash, you'll begin opening up new opportunities. "Oh, I can't charge that much; I'm just starting out." "I can't eat at that restaurant; it's for rich people." "I can't do that job; I'm just not good at math."

    Hey, speaking about math. Let me share you a headtrash story. In high school I was not an exceptional student. I had a reputation for being smart, but my grades didn't show it. And in math, I was the worst. I spent zero time on studying math, and so I just didn't understand it. Barely got through the courses.

    A couple years after graduation I had to take a math course to get into the operations management program. I was shakin'! Math was always a problem for me; I was never going to be good at it!

    Fortunately, the teacher I got for this math course was one of the best and it was truly a life-changing event. His name was Joe, and sadly he died of skin cancer a few years later. But when he was teaching this course, he had a talk with me. I wanted to do well in this course. I wanted to get into the opman program. But I just couldn't see how I was going to to well at math, since it had always been a problem for me.

    "Calm down," Joe told me. "Don't panic. There's a method here." Little did I know, there's always a method. "You haven't been good at math because you think you're not good at math. So you don't put any effort in. Do this: learn the method. Practice the method. When the test comes, you'll be ready."

    I studied, did my homework, and stayed after class. Tests arrived and I not only passed them, I did OK. I got a B in the course.

    (I was a poor 19-year-old waiter then, working night shift--and one memorable night the heel of my shoe fell off! Joe fixed it with the handyman's secret weapon, duct tape, and I had a silver-heeled trip home on the bus. Good times!)

    The B was nowhere near as important as the change in mind that Joe had directed me to make. I began to think I could be good at math.

    Fast forward three years later: I was taking some courses to finish my business degree. One of them was a high-level statistics course that I had already taken the previous year in the opman program. The degree curriculum just wouldn't let us few opman guys out of taking the course a second time. I had the exact same teacher again, too, a Doctor of Math. Yes. A Doctor of Math. Taught me 3 courses.

    At the beginning of this class of budding business admin grads, the Doc says, "So...what do you think you're gonna get in this extremely difficult course?" And he asked everybody.

    "Well," I responded, "since I got 90% last year with you...I'm gonna get 90% again."

    Everyone laughed.

    Guess what. I got 90%. For the second time.

    Our expectations lead us to good or bad outcomes. Be wary of your expectations. There are company presidents at large businesses that even I am a bit nervous about calling, because I worry they might "be too big for me." And that's my head trash. That's the level that it's at. I continue to work on it; I don't think it will ever end, it's part of being human.

    Examine your beliefs. Question them. If a guy like me can go from a near-failure at math to a tutor helping others in six months, imagine what you've been holding yourself back from--for no good reason.

    Miss ya, Joe.
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    • Profile picture of the author jllagu01
      I had the same problem when I first started marketing my article writing services. I thought that the only way I can stay competitive in a sea of other contractors is to charge low but I realized later on that it's not going to work because you will feel that you're not well compensated for all the hard work you've done. I think that people should start seeing their true self-worth and not belittle their skills and expertise. No one is better than the other. On the other hand, if you don't have what it takes, then don't ever attempt to market yourself as "guru" if you have nothing to show off because will know. Learn, experiment, mingle with experts and other professionals, do your research and practice are what will build your confidence to charge higher.
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  • Profile picture of the author theultimate1
    WOW. That's awesome! Congratulations

    I'm specifically interested in the website part. What kind of a website do you create for them for $500? Would you be able to share the URL please (here or by PM)? I'm getting into WordPress-based website creation (if it can even be called that), so knowing what's selling would be insightful to me too. Thanks
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  • Profile picture of the author johnben1444
    It depends on the angle your audience looks at it.

    And fortunately, charging too low can make you look unprofessional or inexperience. Pricing is also an attribute of a successful marketing campaign, always price well or lose the client.
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  • Profile picture of the author mjbmedia
    Well one of the UKs leading SEO/PPC agencies only charge £100 management fee per month for PPC campaigns, eg £500 a month will buy their clients £400 PPC clicks , there is a £500 set up fee at the outset , but even so it surprised me, but then maybe less so when I look into them more and see they don't go beyond the basics yet they're still deemed one of the top boys more so on reputation and I guess lack of knowledge by those building that reputation (their wet behind the ears clientele) .

    Of course part of their model is to make money on some other services and use the likes of PPC and a solidifier ie the client has 1 service with them its easy for the client to leave, if the client has 3+ services with them ,its more hassle for the client to leave them.
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  • Profile picture of the author JackSmith012
    Originally Posted by Kasparov View Post

    Hello everyone. I wanted to share a story with you guys about something a client said to me that made me think. I'm quite new to selling internet services. I started out with creating Wordpress websites, now I'm more into doing Pay Per Click Campaigns. That's just a little background about me.

    So I basically created a website for a client and after I created the website, we got to the PPC campaign portion. I managed to sell the website for $500 and they absolutely loved it. When we got to the PPC part, I told my client that I charge a $100 monthly fee + 10% of the campaign. The response that my client gave me was shocking.

    My client ended up asking me why I only charge $100. He ended up feeling bad that he was paying me so little for a PPC campaign. He told me "In the future, once we get the ball rolling, you can definitely charge me more, as long as it's reasonable." He also told me that I didn't seem like a "$100 a month type of guy." On top of that, he told me that he would pay me a bonus for every sale he makes through PPC.

    Anyways, that's just my little story, hoping to inspire some fellow Warriors out there. Never underestimate the power of what you do and value the services you're capable of providing to others.
    You client was one of those people who respect talent. And people of this kind are very few. You are very lucky that you get such a nice client. However, normally clients irritate much; they bring false errors so that they can make it reason of paying you less.
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  • Profile picture of the author ATAC
    You have to realize whenever giving a price the perceived value of your products and services that you are offering.
    In other words if your price is low the customers perceived value is that it is a low quality product.

    The higher the price the higher the persevered value ..
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  • Profile picture of the author trader909
    Banned
    many are stuck in the "selling to broke unemployed types e-books for $7 money back guarantee.

    big business = different ball game
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  • Profile picture of the author laurencewins
    I have had it happen too. Some say I'm charging too little but it can be hard to know what the right price is. If it's an unusual request, I ask what their rough budget is and then I can calculate from there.
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  • Profile picture of the author DavidAllenNeron
    Better to start off high in my opinion and negotiate your way down, much easier than trying to negotiate yourself up...
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  • Profile picture of the author JessZ07
    I've seen the same problem happen over and over again in all industries, not just internet marketing. if you undervalue yourself, people don't listen/let you do what you know you can do. if you overvalue yourself, they won't pay.

    tricky balance.
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