3 replies
Hello all,

I sell cell phones and data plans in telemarketing.

I have written a script that works fairly consistently (or at least I use it as a viable reference during the sale for myself). I used it for two and a half weeks.

For certain prospects (people with Iphones paying 80-90$ + a month), I am fairly certain in being able to close them.

So I think I'm on to something even if it's very very far from perfect, and I'd just like general tips on how to tweak it.

I don't think I'll be handing it over to anyone else to use,I memorized it and I do not need it per se but I just want to isolate as many variables as possible.

So my qs:

1- beside dials,prospects reached and closing ratio, Which stats should I keep?

2-What part should be said verbatim (if any) and which part should be left to improvisation?

Right now, for the campaign I'm doing, there's a very wide ranges of prospects and needs. Some just need a basic flip phones for emergencies, others are hipsters who want iphones. Others are penny-pinchers

in general, it's much easier to find said hipsters that are paying exhorbitant rates and simply compete on price but they are somewhat rare to find. Should I keep the script as broad and general as possible or should I tailor it to a specific type of prospect?

Right now I follow a basic structure of Qualification + Presentation + arguments. Once I'm done with the presentation, I listen to the objection, I probe some more then I go back to the script.

I don't have a list of objections because shuffling paper around during a call is too much of a hassle. it's more as a skeleton which I can come back to if needed.

Am I doing the right thing?

Thanks,
#script #tips #writing
  • Profile picture of the author laurencewins
    You should have a list of objections handy because there will be a lot of typical ones that happen a lot and it saves your mind racing while on the actual call (when you least need it to race). If you think you're shuffling papers, try sticking pages to the wall or some other surface where you don't need to shuffle.

    Scripts always work on a very precise dialogue but you leave yourself the latitude to improvise according to each specific call.

    I hope that makes sense and helps a bit.
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    Cheers, Laurence. Writer/Editor/Proofreader.
    Website / Blog for more info.

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    • Profile picture of the author jakedenver
      If you are taking inbound calls, use a unique selling point for yourself. Say "Mrs. Stevens, a lot of times people call and have miss communications with representatives. I am here to help people select the right plan. This way everybody is happy and we keep our volume low. I can even help people select a plan if they have no clue what they are in need of. Half the time they are on the wrong plan. I have a few questions to ask you before I can get you set up so this doesn't happen again." - use a genuine tonality and you will get a better desk in six months.

      I don't want to come off as a "hot shot" here, but I advanced quickly. I didn't like that business. Brian Tracy has some good advice on this too though. Check it out, especially if you're cold calling.
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  • Profile picture of the author Matthew North
    Originally Posted by socialentry View Post

    Hello all,

    I sell cell phones and data plans in telemarketing.

    I have written a script that works fairly consistently (or at least I use it as a viable reference during the sale for myself). I used it for two and a half weeks.

    For certain prospects (people with Iphones paying 80-90$ + a month), I am fairly certain in being able to close them.

    So I think I'm on to something even if it's very very far from perfect, and I'd just like general tips on how to tweak it.

    I don't think I'll be handing it over to anyone else to use,I memorized it and I do not need it per se but I just want to isolate as many variables as possible.

    So my qs:

    1- beside dials,prospects reached and closing ratio, Which stats should I keep?

    2-What part should be said verbatim (if any) and which part should be left to improvisation?

    Right now, for the campaign I'm doing, there's a very wide ranges of prospects and needs. Some just need a basic flip phones for emergencies, others are hipsters who want iphones. Others are penny-pinchers

    in general, it's much easier to find said hipsters that are paying exhorbitant rates and simply compete on price but they are somewhat rare to find. Should I keep the script as broad and general as possible or should I tailor it to a specific type of prospect?

    Right now I follow a basic structure of Qualification + Presentation + arguments. Once I'm done with the presentation, I listen to the objection, I probe some more then I go back to the script.

    I don't have a list of objections because shuffling paper around during a call is too much of a hassle. it's more as a skeleton which I can come back to if needed.

    Am I doing the right thing?

    Thanks,
    Two things, first make sure you are Signposting or setting up expectations during each step of the process.

    'John, just to see if there's a reason to keep talking at all, would I be able to ask you a couple of questions?'

    ~ Segue into Discovery/Qualification

    'John, while I've got you on the phone, I'll quickly run you through a quote and we can find you a plan that's suits you and then you can take it from there. Does that sound fair?'

    ~ Segue into Presentation

    'John, we have several price points available. I'll start a $xx per month and we can adjust up or down depending on your requirements. Does that make sense?'

    ~ Anchor the price high. You can always move down and it'll appear cheaper by contrast.

    'John, the next step is that I'll arrange this contract for you today, you won't pay anything right now and you should get this in the mail in the next few days.

    How do you normally pay your bills?

    What bank are you with?

    What's your BSB/Account number

    Etc..'

    ~ The 'Assumptive Close'

    Signposting is important because you are telling the prospect what is going to happen next. It also relaxes them and they know what to expect next.

    The second thing is to script your most common objections you hear:

    'John, the thing which makes our contracts stand out is that you are the owner of your own policy. You can easily make changes to your account, so you can always talk it over with your partner later if that's what you decide to do. Most people generally don't but it's an option to consider. What do you think?' ~ Neutralize that stall before it comes back to haunt you

    Do the same with your other common objections that you hear. If you can, handle the nastiest one upfront, right after you introduce yourself.

    In regards to what parts should be read verbatim.. the way I write scripts is in reverse. I say the same things to each prospect because they are proven to work.

    You can't rely on improvisation if you want to have consistently brilliant calls. Is everything you say always awesome? Of course not. You need to remember what you said and write it down, then include it as part of your sales process. This is a major secret to selling. I would verbatim EVERYTHING because I know that it has been proven to work hundreds of times before. If you fly by the seat of your pants there is a much wider margin for error. Why complicate something that already works? Not that this is not the same as 'Reading', a script, because if you build it yourself from parts that sound natural and work FOR YOU there is no way it can sound canned or contrived.

    Hope that helps..
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