How do I Combat? "Why do I need a website? How Will it Bring Me More Business?"

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I have something else to put out there for discussion. If people don't mind

I was talking to some business owners and about me thinking about offering web design services and they mentioned some things that really stuck out.)

They said because i'm targeting small businesses and such, some of them are going to be completely against the idea of a website. That is because a lot of them have the mentality people already know who they are and they are going to come here anyway (Especially Restaurants like Pizzeria's, and other small places like that). These businesses main focus is doing sales in a small radius around there location.There not trying to service the whole world.

I was also told that in order for these people to possibly want a website, i need to relay to them how i'm going to drive more business to them. Because a lot of these places don't care about there Google search rating or where they come up in particular search engine. They want something that they can physically see or touch. They want to see an increase in calls and/more customers through their door.

My question is what can i do and say when/if a business says Why do I need a Website and how is this website going to translate into more sales? Cause in all actuality how can i drive more business to their establishment.

Another thing that was mentioned to me was. I don't have a physical brick and mortar building at the moment. That is a issue with some people. They think your trying to scam them. Since I don't have a physical location.

What can i do to combat that?

I work for Newspaper that the people in the area either no or have heard of. I was going to mention that I work there and such during my sales pitch. And that's so they know where to "find me". So they know i'm not going to take off with their money.

Thank you for your Time Again
#combat
  • Profile picture of the author sandalwood
    It would seem to me you'd know if their competitor(s) have websites. If they do, your answer is: to make sure you get the client/customer before these guys and then show your prospect their competitor's sites.
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    • Profile picture of the author Action Man
      I know what you mean

      but as everything is smartphone now, and if folks looking for a local restaurant for example,?

      offer a mobile site to them, you could do wills quick building example sites and email them with an example. Will is is in the mobile section of warriors.

      explain to them their competitors are doing this and they are losing customers etc

      I dont know if this helps

      regards

      JIm
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  • Profile picture of the author pearce
    I would say in order to keep up with the times, online visility is more important than yellow page visibility. People search online for information. Thats why you NEED a website.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    Originally Posted by ario131038 View Post

    I have something else to put out there for discussion. If people don't mind

    I was talking to some business owners and about me thinking about offering web design services and they mentioned some things that really stuck out.)

    They said because i'm targeting small businesses and such, some of them are going to be completely against the idea of a website. That is because a lot of them have the mentality people already know who they are and they are going to come here anyway (Especially Restaurants like Pizzeria's, and other small places like that). These businesses main focus is doing sales in a small radius around there location.There not trying to service the whole world.

    I was also told that in order for these people to possibly want a website, i need to relay to them how i'm going to drive more business to them. Because a lot of these places don't care about there Google search rating or where they come up in particular search engine. They want something that they can physically see or touch. They want to see an increase in calls and/more customers through their door.

    My question is what can i do and say when/if a business says Why do I need a Website and how is this website going to translate into more sales? Cause in all actuality how can i drive more business to their establishment.

    Another thing that was mentioned to me was. I don't have a physical brick and mortar building at the moment. That is a issue with some people. They think your trying to scam them. Since I don't have a physical location.

    What can i do to combat that?

    I work for Newspaper that the people in the area either no or have heard of. I was going to mention that I work there and such during my sales pitch. And that's so they know where to "find me". So they know i'm not going to take off with their money.

    Thank you for your Time Again
    These are all 'phantom issues'.

    They're not real.

    SORT for prospects who don't have an issue with you not having a brick and mortar business...and who already value having a website.

    You are going to have a tough enough time without having to convince everyone you encounter of the basic value of what you have to offer.
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    • Profile picture of the author ario131038
      Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

      These are all 'phantom issues'.

      They're not real.

      SORT for prospects who don't have an issue with you not having a brick and mortar business...and who already value having a website.

      You are going to have a tough enough time without having to convince everyone you encounter of the basic value of what you have to offer.
      With all due respect. These issues may be "phantom issues", but a lot of businesses have these notions. I'm trying to target a large group of small businesses and some of them are going to say that. There are so many small businesses in my surrounding area with terrible/no web presence. I want to change that. There is a lot of potential to make money. And even if i wasn't targeting small businesses; there's larger businesses that are run by old school individuals that don't see the value in a website. And they would be asking me the above questions. And in those cases I wouldn't know their mentality until i'm in mid-conversation. I want to be prepared.
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      • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
        Originally Posted by ario131038 View Post

        With all due respect. These issues may be "phantom issues", but a lot of businesses have these notions. I'm trying to target a large group of small businesses and some of them are going to say that. There are so many small businesses in my surrounding area with terrible/no web presence. I want to change that. There is a lot of potential to make money. And even if i wasn't targeting small businesses; there's larger businesses that are run by old school individuals that don't see the value in a website. And they would be asking me the above questions. And in those cases I wouldn't know their mentality until i'm in mid-conversation. I want to be prepared.
        You are going to get tired out, bummed out and burnt out.

        The effort of having to try to prove to every prospect why they should have a website is too exhausting.

        Find out your individual prospect's preferences and beliefs FIRST before you try to sell anything.

        I continue to find it amusing, after all these years, how everyone trying to be a salesperson thinks "It's just me" who has to deal with this stuff.

        Have you considered the possibility that YOU are making them bring these questions up, because you walk in worried they're going to? Even the title of your thread shows the headspace you're in. "Combat"?? Do you really think you have to fight with your prospects?
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        • Profile picture of the author socialentry
          Instead of going in with the mindset educating everyone, you should qualify better and be more selective as to whom you pitch (e.g. people who are already buying advertising).

          This way,you don't have to sell them on the idea, you just have to sell them on why you are the best which is much easier.

          A lot of sales success I think is good time management. One prospect might be closed in 10 hours (with several callbacks), vs. the other in 20 minutes in one call vs. the other who needs an epiphany like another great depression, a personal warning from the grim reaper or a near-bankruptcy. I do believe that most everyone can be convinced eventually but at what costs in time and sweat?

          I think it would be a good idea to pitch everyone is if you have ultra targeted and very very limited leads (e,g, CTOs of top 50 US hospitals).

          Since you don't have this restriction, why make it hard on yourself?
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        • Profile picture of the author ario131038
          Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

          You are going to get tired out, bummed out and burnt out.

          The effort of having to try to prove to every prospect why they should have a website is too exhausting.

          Find out your individual prospect's preferences and beliefs FIRST before you try to sell anything.

          I continue to find it amusing, after all these years, how everyone trying to be a salesperson thinks "It's just me" who has to deal with this stuff.

          Have you considered the possibility that YOU are making them bring these questions up, because you walk in worried they're going to? Even the title of your thread shows the headspace you're in. "Combat"?? Do you really think you have to fight with your prospects?
          The title of my thread doesn't define my mindset. I had particular questions that i wanted discussed. So I chose a particular title that would appeal to multiple audiences. I understand that it may be exhausting and so on and so forth. But i'm not going to go into a situation with a negative mindset thinking the worst. But seeing that I like to think of multiple outcomes to a scenario, I want to be prepared. I would be absolutely foolish t o walk into a sales meeting thinking the client isn't going to have any opposition.

          I ask the questions I do and have a certain thought process because I know the area I want to sell in. I grew up in this area, I know a lot of peoples mentalities and ways of thinking. I want to respond efficiently to any opposition i may face. I cant walk into a sales meeting thinking the potential client is only going to agree with me.

          Yes its going to be tough, but im not only going to target people that may have opposition. But looking at all the small businesses I feel like I need to try and capitalize. There is at least 100 small businesses I could market too and possibly get business. But i want to be prepared for anything. Seeing as i know the area.

          I have done sales in the past, (Back when Nextel was popular. Selling cell phone accessories, phone unlocks, repair, ringtones, games. etc. Also did work int the Verizon and t-moblile areas doing the same thing.).Also sold electronics as for a while. Selling is selling but i just want to adjust my tactics that's all. Im not quitting my job or anything. I have no problem working hard or doing a challenging task. I just see too much potential money that could be made. Its just addressing the task in a particular manner.

          Im just trying to figure out how to break down this barrier people have around me in the event they decide to put it up. Because of my current and former job I have creditably if i go around saying info about that and dropping names but I don't feel like doing that. I want my sales pitch and such to be enough. I don't want people bothering my currrent and previous employers asking them dumb questions and trying to get hand outs.
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    • Profile picture of the author MrFume
      Precisely, all of these doubters and umm and ahhers will be out of business or in extreme difficulties because they are doofuses and cannot smell the coffee - work with people who at least part way 'get it'
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      • Profile picture of the author yukon
        Originally Posted by MrFume View Post

        Precisely, all of these doubters and umm and ahhers will be out of business or in extreme difficulties because they are doofuses and cannot smell the coffee - work with people who at least part way 'get it'
        Every business situation is unique, even same niche businesses are unique.

        Believe it or not some business owners don't want more business than they already have or don't want to grow their business larger. Growing a business larger is expensive & time consuming (employees, materials, expansion, etc...).

        Just because someone doesn't buy a website doesn't mean they can't run a profitable business. Otherwise they wouldn't be in business before the guy showed up at their front door selling websites.
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        • Profile picture of the author savidge4
          This is just one of those topics... It immediately pulls the "You are just stupid for doing that" responses. And in the eyes of many.. yes it is stupid.

          Let me start with this. Gary absolutely says if they aren't coming to me, then I am not going to bother. BUT you are absolutely missing the greater picture. Gary has EXPERIENCE. Gary has a track record. Gary has $10,000,000 deals that he has closed for his clients. DO YOU?

          BUT how did Gary get to where he is today? wine tv right? and spending countless hours on facebook and twitter doing what? ANSWERING QUESTIONS. That's right you hear him say it all the time. "If I have to answer what wine to pair with fish one more time" everyone laughs. but HOW did he get where he is TODAY? he got there by putting in the MANY days of doing one thing and one thing only. REACHING, and EDUCATING. ( Today is singular... and Many is plural )

          Since Gary was brought up, and used as an example ( Poorly I might add ) and I happen to think he is one of the greatest minds in the modern online marketing scene, lets carry on and use him as an example.

          We need to step this back for just a moment. We need to look at what we are educating our Prospects on. Lets look at Gary again. With Wine TV what was he educating his current and potential clients about? His product - His store. He was / is USING Social as a method of REACH, and through that REACH he was / is EDUCATING and developing his clients about HIS product.

          So then tie this back to our discussion here. You want to target specifically on a local market. ( this is what I do ) You are then hitting the pavement and REACHING your potential clients. You need to EDUCATE to your prospects the benefit of your product / service. NOT the benefits to being online, but HOW using your product / service online can give your prospect a return of investment.

          this market place in particular has been ABUSED by those that go out and sell websites and nothing more. There you go, your website is done, and that's it. The client never sees a return on the investment. One person with a bad experience tells 10 of that experience in turn that10 share to 100 of the 1's experience. WE now have the stigmatism run wild that websites are not worth the investment.

          I would say that in general in todays world as online as we are, you have a 80% chance of running into a prospect that thinks that internet marketing will not work. ( based on the study I funded the number is more like 85% )

          So looking at say a market that has 5000 business'. you stand a chance at closing 1000 of those clients, well dang that is a life time of work. You get busy after your first year, you scale things up. Instead of completing 1 client a week, you get to 10 a week. ( there is only 10 years of work now ) Things are really cranking along and you scale even more, you are now completing 1000 sites a year ( My personal short term goal right now - should hit it next year ). That market in the beginning had the lifetime of business opportunity, shrank into 1 years worth of work in as little as 3 years.

          Without the process of education built into you work flow, your work at some point will DRY up. Be it you drying it up, or the mass of business' providing the same services as yourself. You need to REACH further than the "easy" 20%.

          A real world example of this. I work with 6 Lawn Care professionals in my market. after a few years of this, I noticed these guys are really not gaining NEW clients every year, they are simply stealing them from one another. As much as what they do sustains them, there is no real growth. Its basically the same 2000 lawns every year. Instead of Peter doing the lawn year in and out, Peter is doing it one year, and Paul the next. Peter then gains one from Jon, and Jon gets another from Paul.

          For growth in this environment you have to stay consistent with the clients that you have and start reaching into that 85% of the market that has not been tapped. That is where I see LONG TERM success coming from in a market oriented business model.
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        • Profile picture of the author MrFume
          Originally Posted by yukon View Post

          Every business situation is unique, even same niche businesses are unique.

          Believe it or not some business owners don't want more business than they already have or don't want to grow their business larger. Growing a business larger is expensive & time consuming (employees, materials, expansion, etc...).

          Just because someone doesn't buy a website doesn't mean they can't run a profitable business. Otherwise they wouldn't be in business before the guy showed up at their front door selling websites.
          Yeah thanks for the lecture man but I was referring to the business people who refuse to acknowledge reality, the cruisers who are happy doing their thing is another story-although there will not be too many that would not benefit from increased leads, customers-attrition occurs in every industry, people die, get sick you need replacement customers. I do not walk in anywhere - I was suggesting the OP target his market and go with business that do indeed want to grow, to prosper-we all know there are exceptions, I don't need your pedantic arrogance to illuminate me-cheers.
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  • Profile picture of the author quadagon
    Ok so on the second front do you know anyone else in business you could hire a room from and use there address, could you use virtual office space or a mailing address to give the appearance of being a real world business. Secondly why not look at a pay per call vocie answering service they can take messages and you can call clients back when free. Remember perception is reality.

    On the first point surely this is just selling, ask questions, listen for answers try and find there pain point and match your benefits to their needs.

    With regards to fast food outlets offer incentives and coupons in exchange for email addresses. You can then highlight to the business owner that he can generate custom on quiet nights by doing a mail shot and getting instant results - something you can not do offline and there is the added benefit it doesn't cost.
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  • Profile picture of the author Matt Lee
    I agree with Jason, if they don't understand the value of a website, and how their customers are going to find them - it's not worth it. It's an up hill battle every time, and finally IF and WHEN they do see the light, and are ready to build a website/market it online - they are the first to b*tch that the rate you quote them. Then you educate them on what goees into a website, blah blah blah and the vicious cycle continues.
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  • Profile picture of the author savidge4
    Originally Posted by ario131038 View Post

    I was also told that in order for these people to possibly want a website, i need to relay to them how i'm going to drive more business to them. Because a lot of these places don't care about there Google search rating or where they come up in particular search engine. They want something that they can physically see or touch. They want to see an increase in calls and/more customers through their door.

    My question is what can i do and say when/if a business says Why do I need a Website and how is this website going to translate into more sales? Cause in all actuality how can i drive more business to their establishment.

    Another thing that was mentioned to me was. I don't have a physical brick and mortar building at the moment. That is a issue with some people. They think your trying to scam them. Since I don't have a physical location.

    What can i do to combat that?

    I work for Newspaper that the people in the area either no or have heard of. I was going to mention that I work there and such during my sales pitch. And that's so they know where to "find me". So they know i'm not going to take off with their money.

    Thank you for your Time Again
    There is a difference between a "Web Designer" and a "Marketer" that uses Web Design as a tool. Does a business need a "Website"? NO. Do they want results, that they can take to the bank? YES.

    When and if you start looking at it like that, then you will start to understand that what you are thinking are objections right now, are not objections but ques to adjust the terms and language that you are speaking. You simply are not presenting what you have to offer with the right language.

    So the question becomes what are you offering? Are you offering a website? Or a vehicle to extend the potential reach of a business?

    Only fools sells websites.

    So what exactly is a vehicle to extending the potential reach of a business? Glad you asked... A vehicle that extends potential reach is a collection of pages on the internet that answer a few core questions. Who, What, Where, When, Why, and How ( 5 W's and a H )

    So to break that down. Who they are.. the back story of who owns it, who works there etc. What they do. This will describe their products and services. Where they do it, their address or the fact that they deliver or or whatever. When they do it, easy easy hours of operation. Why do they do it... this again plays into the back story, are they third generation, or was it a hobby. How they do it.. is it with Passion? they use of cutting edge technology etc.

    These do not have to be on 5 separate pages, it is simply a KISS guide to the type of content that should be on the collection of pages.

    So how does that translate to getting people into the store. Well it doesn't, and that is why people that sell "websites" are fools.

    At this point right here is when you leave behind being a website builder and become a marketer. There are 2 things that you need to do. #1 build a mobile site in addition to the desktop site. #2 learn everything you can about Google Places and Bing Business, as well as Yahoo maps. More specifically learn how to implement them.

    I will attack the recommendation for a mobile site first. There are basically 2 features that a mobile website has that a desktop site does not. the Push to talk feature, and the push to directions feature. 1 press and your clients phone is ringing. there is no copy and paste and yada yada. Instant results. Push to directions feature... well what needs to be said here? directions from where your clients customer is right now, to your clients door.

    This DOES NOT have to frilly and complicated and all of that. Again in short form answer 5 W's and a H and ensure the Call and Directions feature are there. I suggest using NetObjects Masaic. There are more than a few reason why this; the fact that you can build it before you commit to it is awesome. Its pretty much drag and drop, and its a whole whopping $50.00 a year.

    Now we get into the good stuff. Google Places and Bing Business - oh yeah Yahoo maps too. This is where the objection "I don't want to advertise to the whole world" gets answered. Take a moment and open a new tab in your browser. go to Google and type in "Italian Restaurant" So what do you see? A bar across the top of the listings page? All LOCAL listings right? A map to the right? All LOCAL listings right? Look at the search results... More local listings correct?

    Did we type in your city name? NO. This here internet stuff is MAGIC. It knows where I am searching from, and provides results that are useful to me WOW! You can CONTROL the distance from your clients location this type of result will be seen. Be it 5 miles or 100 miles. THIS is the key to you driving traffic to your clients. And not just traffic, but potential traffic that is close in proximity that WILL walk into their door!

    Start with looking at Catalyst eMarketing goto their website, and get lost ( as in read for hours ) engross yourself in learning how to make the listings, how to get citations, how THIS is your key to success.

    Now we get into an important aspect of all of this. PROOF that what you are doing is working. I personally like using "Online Only Coupons" be it something the clients customer prints out at home, or simply shows them from their phone. I provide dollar sized coupon redemption forms that the client uses to track how many they get on a daily / weekly basis. I have included spaces so that they can keep track of the date, the time and the amount of discount. So they get a coupon, they write on it if they wish, they can now put it in the register to keep track. This fortifies PROOF that what you are doing is working.

    WHO should you be targeting. To say the least there are many answers to this question. As already stated use a process of qualification or sorting to determine if you are spinning your wheels or not. As you gain experience in the process of sales, you will be able to determine this quickly.

    I can tell you stay away from Pizza joints. I am not going to say that they are completely offline marketing oriented, but it takes a far deeper system than what I have laid out here to get that.

    I personally look for niche / specialty industries with little competition. Vacuum repair, or shoe repair, or small fishing tackle stores. The reason being, as much as they are serving the community that they are located, they have a greater potential reach. Is there another store offering their service 25 miles away? If you live in a smaller community as I do, the answer is no. There are 3 vacuum repair places they all sell for the most part different brands, and their geographical reach is 30 miles to the north and 80+ miles to the West East and South. The above model works extremely well for these folks. You can easily draw new customers for your clients, that they have never reached before.

    The same goes for that odd-ball Indian Restaurant as an example, may be the only one in forever miles. Again, you want to target at first the business' that you can most impact. and with that you need to understand that results = referals. If you can provide results for these folks, they will refer. And because the referral is coming from a small niched business, people that own and operate within a more crowded marketplace will take notice, when these smaller business start talking about the growth they have experienced using your services ( If they can do that for that small business, they start thinking, what you could do for them )

    What is your worth? From a prospects point of view this is a big question that needs to be answered. A quick analogy that I use all the time; A restaurant's average bill is $50.00 we will assume the business is run right and there is something like 20% profit. so each NEW customer is worth $10.00 every time they come in. IF, at the very least you provide 2 NEW customer a week ( we know this based on the coupon proof ) you have brought in an extra $1040.00 in the first year using your service.

    So if you were to charge $600 for developing the 3 point system and then charge $35 a month for hosting, you come real close to being at a break even point. As in it would cost you prospect nothing to use you.

    As you gain the experience in providing results, your price can go up accordingly. The first system you develop, you may only get minimal results. The 5th site, you may no longer be bringing 2 customer a week, but 20 a week. your value goes to $10400.00 (in profit ) or $52,000 gross. As you have the ability to bring more business you have the ability to charge more.

    Now the issue of you not having an "office". You do, you work from home. In todays world, that is more than acceptable. in fact, I think of it this way; The people that are tied to a brick and mortar are envious of your position. They think you have freedom, and an open schedule. you in their eyes are living the life. So just let go of that one. Use your home address and call that one done!

    There is more, but I think this will work for now...

    Hope that Helps!
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    • Profile picture of the author savidge4
      Through a partnership with a local college ( specifically a Professor of Marketing ) I had access to a number of college students to do the leg work for a research project. I wanted to know specifically how many listings in the yellow pages had websites, had claimed local listings, and had a easily searchable social profile.

      We started with a smaller community to start, and got some base results. Then we went through another small community and got kind of the same results. A third... a pattern started appearing. 6 more small communities ( that had their own "yellow pages" ) There was CLEARLY a pattern. We then jumped up to 4 larger communities in the vicinity of the 9 smaller ones. It no longer was a pattern, it became a constant. We then went through the same process for the "Largest" community / market in the area, and again the numbers were constant.

      15% on better than average of all listings in the yellow pages had NO online presents what so ever.

      Me you and the door post understand that the number is not a true representation of the total market, because this study does not include companies NOT listed in the yellow pages. However, setting that group aside, it DOES clearly indicate the POTENTIAL for growth in web development across the board.

      Low laying fruit is one thing... 85% untapped potential is another.

      SO what now? It DOES come down to education. I am particularly in a good place with my situation, The professor and I are seeking grants to develop an college / small business outreach program. ( exciting stuff ). More importantly is the research to determine what points we should be targeting in the education process.

      There is no question that educating a prospect is a double edged sword. you can be preaching to the choir, or convincing them that some schmo that came in last week, that they like better, may actually have known what they were talking about. You just never know.

      I very often will spend the time. I have some closes that took months. One recently that I have been working for well over a year. ( Ironically my price as doubled since I first started talking to that guy - almost lost him all over again hahaha )

      I think that is part of the business. some are easy, and some need work. apparently a lot need work! When you start looking at numbers like thaty ou just have to think... there just comes a point in a localized market when you have dried up "Easy" and then what?
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  • Profile picture of the author zerofatzreturns
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    • Profile picture of the author savidge4
      Just to clarify... you are suggesting buy www the prospects business name.com host it, build it, get traffic to it, and then after 3 months try and get paid?


      Originally Posted by zerofatzreturns View Post

      This is an education issue. It's like show them what it is, show them how it works, and show them how it will increase their business right?

      Why not do it this way a few times until word spreads about your company. Why not build your prospect the website for free. Let them experience the increased traffic from the site for themselves. With a local run business it would be very nice to have an order online and pick up at store option.

      After a free 3 month trial they could buy the site from you. Or you could do a training package where you teach them how to run the site. You could line up a situation where your banner is displayed on the site for advertising to your company.

      This way you could prove the benefit of your product and you minimize the risk for the company. In this way you build your local reputation as well as trust with the local business community. Word spreads fast man.
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  • Profile picture of the author yukon
    Maybe stop selling websites & start selling advertising.

    People that are scared of the web don't understand web talk, they understand advertising. So sell advertising (sales pitch) & use the website to generate traffic.

    Keep in mind If you can't generate traffic with a website your reputation is on the line, especially in a small town.
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  • Profile picture of the author ADukes81
    Next!

    You're not in the convincing business, or you shouldn't be. It's 2014, and if they don't have a website or see the value in it, they are not worth your time. They'll most likely be following the paths of Blockbuster, Borders, etc.

    Don't waste another second with business owners like this. Work with people who see the value in what you offer. It's a much better (more fun) experience.

    I have a video to share with you that will break the whole "fortune is in the follow up". I know most in this part of the forum will hate this, but I do it in my business and ya know what? So much less stress. I don't follow up with prospects.

    Why?

    I am not chasing anyone for business.

    There are MORE THAN ENOUGH business owners out there that see the value we offer, go after them, not the ones that are going to be a pain.

    Offline marketing is all about positioning, master that and you can write your own check. BTW -- you will piss people off. F them.

    Watch this video, at 10:30 and on....

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    • great stuff Adukes81

      so many small biz's that will buy....

      ....Next Call.


      love the line (paraphrasing) :

      "When Amazon takes over your business, Albertsons. I'll have a good laugh."

      and at 10:37 mark , pure GOLD! : How to Win the ROI Objection

      and "spend your time on offense, not defense"
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  • Profile picture of the author Gladiator
    Watched the video, entertaining but mainly hype!

    It's up to you to make them see the value of a website or what ever service you offer! When they give you objections it's because they want you to give them reasons why they should buy from you! You have to get creative and give them many reasons why they need what you are selling. Close them! Or move on!

    I believe you have to give your best pitch and effort to close any deal! And you will know when it's time to move on. But I don't agree with just looking for lay-downs! That is for lazy, non closers! In My Opinion! I know that there was more to it but that was the general message.

    There are small businesses that are not worth talking to at all. They probably don't even have business cards! So start with a better lead!

    *how do I know this? I have done it for real not just talk about it!
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  • Profile picture of the author ario131038
    Thanks for your input its very helpful. I would also like to know if you had some suggestions for emailing prospective clients without sounding like im being too overwhelming and sounding like a complete salesman.

    I know I have to address a potential problem, offer a solution to the problem, qualify myself, and leave contact info.

    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
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  • Profile picture of the author Underground
    You should not be trying to sell websites if simple questions like this threw you side-ways and you didn't already know the value. They'll have just clocked you're full of it. Another hustler trying to sell them something they don't need (in their eyes).

    Either do some research and planning yourself on your target's market and build a strong, solid and insightful argument for why they need a website beforehand, e.g., their customers are online in X of numbers and there is a gap there for them to easily take advantage of and you can help them and explain how, or scrap the idea if there isn't and take 5-10 of the main offline marketing areas, go to keyword planner and spend a week analysing the market until you can spot opportunities you can service based on a strong argument. This will get you highly focused on a particular market with a particular need, and then you can create a compelling service around that.

    If you think just getting a few bullets points to regurgitate to prospects who'll need a very strong argument if they are idiotic enough not to know about how the internet can help them, you're in trouble.

    Even those first 30 minutes of the video will give you all you need to do to do some great research and zero on on hot markets. Selling websites with the framing you're using like Savidge pointed out, is a very big distance from a hot market.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?featur...&v=JidRdPJJqPs
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    • Profile picture of the author hometutor
      Originally Posted by Underground View Post

      You should not be trying to sell websites if simple questions like this threw you side-ways and you didn't already know the value. They'll have just clocked you're full of it. Another hustler trying to sell them something they don't need (in their eyes).

      Either do some research
      He is doing research. He's asking us.

      Rick
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      • Profile picture of the author Underground
        Originally Posted by hometutor View Post

        He is doing research. He's asking us.

        Rick
        That's not research.

        That's asking other people to provide the answers to his questions for him so he can then pick the good ones and just repeat them verbatim and not have to think for himself.

        Kind of like ''what's the most profitable service to offer businesses'', and then after getting some opinions here and then the questioner choosing that service to go into business with and start selling, with no understanding or thought put into themselves.

        I meant proper research, that he puts his own time and effort into so he knows the value in what he is offering for himself and how that fits into how he wants to do business. Researching his target market, their needs, and why they need one.

        Building you business on the random opinions and suggestions from people on a forum, while he'll get some good feedback, is not the best way to build a business. You'll soon get found when you don't deeply understand the why behind things and how they all fit together when you come across a clued up business owner who questions a bit deeper then others.
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        • Profile picture of the author JKirby
          Originally Posted by Underground View Post

          I meant properly research, that he puts his own time and effort into so he knows the value in what he is offering for himself and how that fits into how he wants to do business.
          Absolutely. Couldn't agree more. In his OP, he mentioned a Pizzeria asking what they would want a website for? What benefit would they get from it? Any research/exoeruebce into the industry I could rattle off a dozen benefits. 99% of Pizzerias do take out. Set them up with an online ordering system. INSTANT ROI. Help set them up with something that can see 'we had 100 online orders this month'. There's no many answers to these questions but the basic problem I see most marketers having is that at the same time they are talking to lawyers and dentists, they are talking to mom and pop bike shops and pizzerias. Without focusing and understanding the industry you're in, you're shooting shotgun shells at dime-sized targets.
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  • Profile picture of the author hometutor
    Your competitors' websites are open 24/7. Every time they open their email they have a new customer who has contacted them by email. They return the call and make that sale. Wouldn't that be nice if that was you instead? I assume you feel you do a better job than your competitors?

    Rick
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  • Profile picture of the author JTV
    Alright, like others said, it's best to not have to fight with people who seem set against a website. Better approach prospects who are more open to the idea. And, like others said, do research, research, research! Theory alone and the experiences of others won't help you if you don't have the drive to make it yourself, but a strong theoretical foundation will inform you all throughout your business life.

    Good luck!
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  • Profile picture of the author JKirby
    In every room of prospects or 'potentials' there are four types of people:
    1. A group ready to buy your service, TODAY
    2. A group wanting your service, but they just don't know if you're the guy/team to do it for them
    3. A group that know they need it EVENTUALLY, but won't get it, or doesn't care about it enough.
    4. A group that will NEVER, EVER buy your product or service

    When you are pitching/closing and going to appointments, you need to ONLY pitch groups 1 & 2.

    Group 3 & 4 are a waste of your time and just move on.

    That doesn't mean you shouldn't prepare rebuttals and overcome objections, but it sounds like you're pitching everyone with a heartbeat, which is a waste of your time unfortunately.
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  • Profile picture of the author concerro
    It is not your job to convince someone they need something. It is easier to find a market for what you can provide and let them know that you are the best person to get it from.
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    • Profile picture of the author misterme
      Originally Posted by concerro View Post

      It is not your job to convince someone they need something.
      I agree with you yet here we are, trying to convince him of something he doesn't want. Ha. The irony.
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  • Profile picture of the author MichaelHiles
    The mistake here is the common misconception that you're being paid for output.

    You're not being paid to do a website. You're being paid to help a company generate more sales.

    Do you understand that difference?
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    • Profile picture of the author mjbmedia
      Originally Posted by MichaelHiles View Post

      The mistake here is the common misconception that you're being paid for output.

      You're not being paid to do a website. You're being paid to help a company generate more sales.

      Do you understand that difference?
      I agree Michael , however theres no doubt that the majority of web site bods only know how to do the website, design, layout, prettiness etc , they don't know nor really do (properly) the money getting part of it.

      Look how many business sites have no real lead gen strategy to them, no call to actions, no real pathway to get the new visitor to engage, build relationships etc etc. Too many web bods make their sites just somewhere to land and take off again, yet theyre still getting paid by multiple clients and that's a fact as I know a few ;-)
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    • Profile picture of the author theultimate1
      Originally Posted by MichaelHiles View Post

      The mistake here is the common misconception that you're being paid for output.

      You're not being paid to do a website. You're being paid to help a company generate more sales.

      Do you understand that difference?
      The OP seems to understand the difference. And while not being explicit, I think that's the question he's asking. But, he's also primarily only a website developer. So, that's the best that he can sell (at the moment).

      I'm kind of in the same situation right now. I know how to develop websites. I'll do the whole user engagement bit by putting up social share buttons, creating an easy-to-navigate interface, lead submission forms at all the right places, interlinking the different pages, and more importantly 'putting up a good amount of content on the site. And the hurdle sort of starts right at this stage. The client doesn't have more than the standard 5 pages of 'business website content - Home, About, Services, Contact' (not even 5 pages, really).

      Here's what I would plan to do in addition to merely putting up a nice-looking mobile-ready website for the client. I'll set up social media accounts, create locals/map listsings, submit the site to local web directories, do on-page SEO with whatever content is available.

      But the trouble is... all this stuff also doesn't translate into ROI. The client himself won't have the time to promote his business/website on social media regularly. And I'm a web developer who just wants to design/develop & sell websites to a client, one at a time. I don't want to do anything more. What then should be my pitch to the client when he asks for the value in what I'm offering?

      I don't intend to hijack OP's thread/question. In fact, I think somewhere he's also asking this question.
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      • Profile picture of the author DABK
        Maybe your client base should be a marketing outfits. You sell them on the idea that all you want to do is create a website and are good at it. They do what they do: market that site, convince the owner he needs 37 pages and 3 separate forms and a blog that needs to be updated weekly.



        Originally Posted by theultimate1 View Post

        The OP seems to understand the difference. And while not being explicit, I think that's the question he's asking. But, he's also primarily only a website developer. So, that's the best that he can sell (at the moment).

        I'm kind of in the same situation right now. I know how to develop websites. I'll do the whole user engagement bit by putting up social share buttons, creating an easy-to-navigate interface, lead submission forms at all the right places, interlinking the different pages, and more importantly 'putting up a good amount of content on the site. And the hurdle sort of starts right at this stage. The client doesn't have more than the standard 5 pages of 'business website content - Home, About, Services, Contact' (not even 5 pages, really).

        Here's what I would plan to do in addition to merely putting up a nice-looking mobile-ready website for the client. I'll set up social media accounts, create locals/map listsings, submit the site to local web directories, do on-page SEO with whatever content is available.

        But the trouble is... all this stuff also doesn't translate into ROI. The client himself won't have the time to promote his business/website on social media regularly. And I'm a web developer who just wants to design/develop & sell websites to a client, one at a time. I don't want to do anything more. What then should be my pitch to the client when he asks for the value in what I'm offering?

        I don't intend to hijack OP's thread/question. In fact, I think somewhere he's also asking this question.
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      • Profile picture of the author savidge4
        The "Why do I need a website?" question is very quickly answered the moment you stop being a "web developer" and become an "Marketer" that specializes in online development.

        If all you can OR want to do is build sites... well the road is barren and short lived for you. You HAVE to develop the skills to do one thing and one thing only; Develop Results. It doesn't matter what you do to get that for your clients, it just matters that you do.

        In my graciously soft toned opinion, you are straight up stealing from clients if you are NOT producing results.

        We do not live in a build it and they will come world. We do not live in a list and they will buy world. All that crap you read about "Content is King" is a lie. The KING is results... and there is only ONE way to get it, and that is through traffic. HOW you get that traffic, and consistently get that traffic is your meal ticket.

        Developing traffic is what is going to pay your clients bills, and in turn PAY YOURS.

        Ever been around a building contractor that is trying to sell his own speck home? its a freakin train wreck... These people rely on Real Estate agents... real estate agents do 1 thing and 1 thing only. They sell homes. How do they sell homes? they get people to walk through them. IE Traffic.

        Another example, Super Bowl commercials. Did you know that more money is spent in the production and airtime of a single 30 second commercial during the Super Bowl than the average American family makes in a LIFETIME? ( And we are not just talking mom and dad here, we are talking the 2.3 kids and some grandkids to boot. 5 Million dollars isn't chump change! ) Why is that? TRAFFIC.

        The sooner you as a developer understand how to create a conversion, the sooner you are offering true value. If you cant go out tomorrow get a click bank product and start converting it in DAYS... you need to figure it out. If you cant set up a amazon affiliate store and get conversions inside a week... you need to figure it out. If you cant set up a single 5 page site and in a matter of weeks get that phone to ring... you need to figure it out!

        Those 3; Sales funnel ( squeeze, optin, offer, email ) e-commerce, and basic lead gen are the STAPLES of a online developments specialist.

        I HIGHLY suggest that you develop one each of the 3 for YOURSELF. get the system down, and simple replicate those systems for your clients. IF you personally cant make money online, how the hell do you expect to make someone else money?


        Originally Posted by theultimate1 View Post

        The OP seems to understand the difference. And while not being explicit, I think that's the question he's asking. But, he's also primarily only a website developer. So, that's the best that he can sell (at the moment).

        I'm kind of in the same situation right now. I know how to develop websites. I'll do the whole user engagement bit by putting up social share buttons, creating an easy-to-navigate interface, lead submission forms at all the right places, interlinking the different pages, and more importantly 'putting up a good amount of content on the site. And the hurdle sort of starts right at this stage. The client doesn't have more than the standard 5 pages of 'business website content - Home, About, Services, Contact' (not even 5 pages, really).

        Here's what I would plan to do in addition to merely putting up a nice-looking mobile-ready website for the client. I'll set up social media accounts, create locals/map listsings, submit the site to local web directories, do on-page SEO with whatever content is available.

        But the trouble is... all this stuff also doesn't translate into ROI. The client himself won't have the time to promote his business/website on social media regularly. And I'm a web developer who just wants to design/develop & sell websites to a client, one at a time. I don't want to do anything more. What then should be my pitch to the client when he asks for the value in what I'm offering?

        I don't intend to hijack OP's thread/question. In fact, I think somewhere he's also asking this question.
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      • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
        Originally Posted by theultimate1 View Post

        The OP seems to understand the difference. And while not being explicit, I think that's the question he's asking. But, he's also primarily only a website developer. So, that's the best that he can sell (at the moment).

        I'm kind of in the same situation right now. I know how to develop websites. I'll do the whole user engagement bit by putting up social share buttons, creating an easy-to-navigate interface, lead submission forms at all the right places, interlinking the different pages, and more importantly 'putting up a good amount of content on the site. And the hurdle sort of starts right at this stage. The client doesn't have more than the standard 5 pages of 'business website content - Home, About, Services, Contact' (not even 5 pages, really).

        Here's what I would plan to do in addition to merely putting up a nice-looking mobile-ready website for the client. I'll set up social media accounts, create locals/map listsings, submit the site to local web directories, do on-page SEO with whatever content is available.

        But the trouble is... all this stuff also doesn't translate into ROI. The client himself won't have the time to promote his business/website on social media regularly. And I'm a web developer who just wants to design/develop & sell websites to a client, one at a time. I don't want to do anything more. What then should be my pitch to the client when he asks for the value in what I'm offering?

        I don't intend to hijack OP's thread/question. In fact, I think somewhere he's also asking this question.
        It can translate into ROI.

        I think it will be very helpful to carefully read this post by Mr. Hiles http://www.warriorforum.com/offline-...ml#post7044236 and carefully study the entire thread http://www.warriorforum.com/offline-...offliners.html

        Then, either learn to offer optimization and conversion and so on, or partner with someone or an agency that does.

        Dan
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  • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
    Signature

    "If you think you're the smartest person in the room, then you're probably in the wrong room."

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  • Unfortunately, a role in just web development can only take you so far... now and days, web developers have to create within their business model, a complete understanding of marketing to really sell the idea..

    In my opinion, the more knowledge you have, the more value you can present to the client.

    The more value you present? well.. Value = $$$$

    Food for thought!
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  • Profile picture of the author Nehaaggarwal
    Does it mention anything about that singing needing heavy manipulation of pitch? Because that would be impressive.
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