How to leverage my Programming skills?

by vaho
11 replies
Hi there!
I need kind of smart advice
I am Ruby developer with 2+years of experience in rather small city in East Europe. I was doing lots of offline jobs before I decided to learn programming, also did some really small affiliate business.
Now, though I am getting some rather "good" money as for my country, it's still 1) not even close to 10$/hour; 2) I am ~30 and I want to stop trading time for money and leverage somehow my skills; 3) to be honest, programming is sometimes fun and involving, but most of time I am bored, so I would do something more interesting and at the same time more profitable where paid for efforts, not time. The only thing I can think of is freelance, but it still is pretty close to full-time job, no leverage, lots of low-rate competitors.

Maybe someone was/is in similar situation an can suggest any sort of ideas at this point.

Regards
#leverage #programming #skills
  • Profile picture of the author Richard Demeny
    Bro. You are a developer and work for less than $9/hr? No offense but you shouldn't be taking projects like those. Respect your time or learn new skills/market yourself.

    Also, I believe you shouldn't do programming if you don't enjoy it. Take the time to know yourself and see what really interests you.
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  • Profile picture of the author 3wCorner
    To improve your skills, read technology and programming blog and see what's new. Learn tutorials from w3schools.com, lynda.com or codeacademy.com. Better yet, get an online programming course.

    For freelancing jobs, post your resume and portfolio at upwork.com, elance.com and outsourcely. Freelancing jobs offer your flexi time to do your work -full or part time depending on your employer's agreement.

    But to be honest, you have to be sure yourself if you want to accept freelancing jobs. This is not permanent job but have lots opportunities and growth.
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  • Profile picture of the author Cristy94
    As Richard said above, if you don't enjoy it don't do it. Most programmers really like their job as it's usually fun, challenging at times but usually pretty easy once you get the hang of it. Improving your programming skills takes times, and the best way to do it is to work on projects which are more and more complex than previous ones you did. If you only do simple projects that you can complete without learning anything new then there is no way you can improve your skills this way.
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  • Profile picture of the author kumaramit222
    HI there, well what Cristy said is correct however, you are a skilled programmer and u know how to get the work done you can and will do great if you can put a little more effort in thinking HOW you can get good opportunities, then the whole world is making profits via upwork and elance you can too find the best options for yourself the thinking has to be done by you. So all the best.
    Thanks
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  • Profile picture of the author princyjenifer123
    To do some better , know what is current trend on IT ,after finding you can go with that.

    Working with current trend definitely will make you good .
    Signature
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  • Profile picture of the author Thoughtgrid
    You can learn the basic programming skills on online and try to write your own code in this way you can leverage your programming skills.
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Warne
    Originally Posted by vaho View Post

    Hi there!
    I need kind of smart advice
    I am Ruby developer with 2+years of experience in rather small city in East Europe. I was doing lots of offline jobs before I decided to learn programming, also did some really small affiliate business.
    Now, though I am getting some rather "good" money as for my country, it's still 1) not even close to 10$/hour; 2) I am ~30 and I want to stop trading time for money and leverage somehow my skills; 3) to be honest, programming is sometimes fun and involving, but most of time I am bored, so I would do something more interesting and at the same time more profitable where paid for efforts, not time. The only thing I can think of is freelance, but it still is pretty close to full-time job, no leverage, lots of low-rate competitors.

    Maybe someone was/is in similar situation an can suggest any sort of ideas at this point.

    Regards
    You can learn/Improve more at w3schools because it is web developer's online site from where you can learn lots of think about HTML5, CSS3 and you can also test your knowledge about HTML5, CSS3 it through online w3c exams as well as I would like to suggest join Koenig Solutions Because if you do the training ,you will get better knowledge in the programming field, I have heard about Online IT Training.
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnAdam1
    For freelancing, you can check freelancer.com website. But to start a good earning and to get more clients, you need to create a good reputation. You can create your reputation by participating in the contests. You can also check Fiverr webisode too. But people usually sell their services in cheap rates in Fiverr.
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  • As a computer programmer who took two years of math in college I found that I often drew upon my (often rusty) mathematical skills to evaluate the efficiency and performance of code that had to process large amounts of data. I also used math to devise algorithms that would process large amounts of data in limited spaces (such as when hard drives fill up).

    You are most likely to need your math skills in programming jobs that deal with:

    Systems architecture
    Programming utilities
    Security applications
    Engineering applications
    Scientific applications
    Mathematical applications
    I spent a number of years developing software tools for applications programmers and often drew upon Set Theory for inspiration. Your ability to think abstractly will help you integrate your mathematical knowledge into your everyday work.
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  • Profile picture of the author Pablo Montanas
    Invest time and broaden out your network. Selling your services privately to people that can trust in your skill is way more valuable to them than picking some off the internet.
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  • Profile picture of the author dmp
    Programming is one of the fields where experience matters. Therefore, to become a better coder, you should code more. However, writing is not the only thing you should do. You also should read code of other developers and learn from it what a good code is.
    You might also find books, which are specifically devoted to coding, useful; such as "Code Complete". They contain descriptions of what good code is, which, combined with your fundamental knowledge, can make you a good programmer.
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