I'm Looking For Affiliate Software That Tracks Variable Commissions

4 replies
I am setting up a Wordpress Multisite Network where the blogsite admins will get to offer products and services from an inventory I stock. They will be allowed to set their own prices and design their own deals on the products, and I will get a fixed amount from each sale.

For example, blogger A sells product A for $25. I get to keep $5, and they get $20 (minus Paypal fees). Blogger B sells the same product A for $10. I still get my $5, and they get the remaining $5 (minus Paypal fees again). Blogger C is a smart alec, and decides to give away the product. I want to bill them $5 (plus the Paypal fees).

The PayPal button is mine, and I will hold their commission for a set period, except in the case of the smart alec, who will lose his blogsite if he doesn't pay the invoice.

Is there a software that will do this ... and do it through Wordpress?

Thanks in advance!
Kirk
#affiliate #commissions #software #tracks #variable
  • Profile picture of the author brentb
    Pretty much any legit affiliate tracking software should do this. Although its not going to be integrated in wordpress. You will get a standalone dashboard.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7681425].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Dan Grossman
    The PayPal button is mine, and I will hold their commission for a set period, except in the case of the smart alec, who will lose his blogsite if he doesn't pay the invoice.
    You're going to lose your PayPal account over this eventually. Factoring -- accepting payments on behalf of other merchants -- is typically a prohibited activity at any merchant account provider or 3rd party processor due to the increased risk and underwriting uncertainty.

    There are payment processors that are built for your type of business, like https://www.balancedpayments.com/

    That aside, a simple question: why do you want to run a network of e-commerce sites on a blogging engine?
    Signature
    Improvely: Built to track, test and optimize your marketing.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7682113].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Kirk Ward
      Originally Posted by Dan Grossman View Post

      You're going to lose your PayPal account over this eventually. Factoring -- accepting payments on behalf of other merchants -- is typically a prohibited activity at any merchant account provider or 3rd party processor due to the increased risk and underwriting uncertainty.
      Good point. I had not thought about the factoring aspect of it, even though I spent fifteen years in that business.
      Originally Posted by Dan Grossman View Post

      There are payment processors that are built for your type of business, like https://www.balancedpayments.com/
      Fantastic. Thanks for the heads up.
      Originally Posted by Dan Grossman View Post

      That aside, a simple question: why do you want to run a network of e-commerce sites on a blogging engine?
      The ability to control several features of the product line and their presentation that are related to marketing. Not an IM site type of product by a long shot, and is a market where the site admins have no time to build and manage their website.
      Signature
      "We are not here to sell a parcel of boilers and vats, but the potentiality of growing rich beyond the dreams of avarice."

      Dr. Samuel Johnson (Presiding at the sale of Thrales brewery, London, 1781)
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7684101].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Kirk Ward
      Originally Posted by Dan Grossman View Post

      There are payment processors that are built for your type of business, like https://www.balancedpayments.com/
      Yikes ... Looking through their site, I noticed that their largest investor seems to be Ashton Kutcher. I may have to change my opinion of him from Demi's Dummy to something actually bordering on Brainiac.
      Signature
      "We are not here to sell a parcel of boilers and vats, but the potentiality of growing rich beyond the dreams of avarice."

      Dr. Samuel Johnson (Presiding at the sale of Thrales brewery, London, 1781)
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7684200].message }}

Trending Topics