by TeamJ
9 replies
  • SEO
  • |
Hello,

I have a question regarding 301 redirects that has caused me some confusion.

I understand it's best practice to only 301 redirect a page once, and avoid creating a 301 redirect chain.

However, for examples sake, let's say a business develops a new site that includes a new and optimised URL for an existing page, and this business 301 redirects the old URL to the new URL.

Example:

Old URL: www.example.com/seo-digital-marketing
New URL: www.example.com/seo-marketing

What then happens if in another year they want to change the pages URL to www.example.com/seo

How would you transfer link juice to the most updated version of the URL without creating a 301 redirect chain?

Thanks
#301 #chains #redirect
  • Profile picture of the author naveenselva
    I've had my site for a while now and have changed the structure a number of times. I'm confident my 301's work well and am not concerned about dead ends on my site.
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    • Profile picture of the author TeamJ
      I don't know, everything I've read has stated 301 redirect chains should be avoided.
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  • Profile picture of the author KylieSweet
    Originally Posted by TeamJ View Post

    How would you transfer link juice to the most updated version of the URL without creating a 301 redirect chain?
    301 redirect is the only way to pass link juice from page to page and considered as one of the best practice in SEO for the users.
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  • Profile picture of the author sarahjack
    Hello TeamJ,

    Redirects shouldn't be a problem, it only enhances optimization and user engagement. This helps especially where your web pages are mentioned, in backlinks.

    Cheers,
    Sarah
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  • Profile picture of the author MikeFriedman
    Originally Posted by TeamJ View Post

    Hello,

    I have a question regarding 301 redirects that has caused me some confusion.

    I understand it's best practice to only 301 redirect a page once, and avoid creating a 301 redirect chain.

    However, for examples sake, let's say a business develops a new site that includes a new and optimised URL for an existing page, and this business 301 redirects the old URL to the new URL.

    Example:

    Old URL: www.example.com/seo-digital-marketing
    New URL: www.example.com/seo-marketing

    What then happens if in another year they want to change the pages URL to www.example.com/seo

    How would you transfer link juice to the most updated version of the URL without creating a 301 redirect chain?

    Thanks
    Really I do not think it would matter much in an example like that, but if you wanted to avoid chaining them together, I would remove the original 301 redirect and point it at the new URL.

    For example URL A is the original URL. URL B is the second one. URL C is the latest URL created.

    So you had URL A redirected to URL B.

    When URL C is created, you remove that redirect and put in a 301 from A to C instead. You also would redirect B to C.

    Then there is no chain.
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    • Profile picture of the author TeamJ
      Originally Posted by MikeFriedman View Post

      Really I do not think it would matter much in an example like that, but if you wanted to avoid chaining them together, I would remove the original 301 redirect and point it at the new URL.

      For example URL A is the original URL. URL B is the second one. URL C is the latest URL created.

      So you had URL A redirected to URL B.

      When URL C is created, you remove that redirect and put in a 301 from A to C instead. You also would redirect B to C.

      Then there is no chain.
      I have another question regarding 301 redirects using the above example.

      What do you do with the original URL A once you set up a redirect to URL B? Do you keep URL A live, or change the settings within the CMS so URL A is not visible to search engines?

      I assume you must have to save URL A somewhere within a CMS if you want to alter a 301 redirect further down the line i.e. URL C is created so you set up separate 301 redirects from URL A to C and URL B to C.

      Would appreciate some insight into this, thanks.
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  • Profile picture of the author George Schwab
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  • Profile picture of the author Profit-smart
    A few 301s split over a great length of time are fine. 301 chains are "Bad" only when used in mass, rapid sequence for Link spam.

    If you move pages or sites occasionally, a 301 is your best friend.
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  • Profile picture of the author MarkJukov
    Yeah, as long as the 2 moves are spread over the year, there really should be no problem at all.
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    • Profile picture of the author paulgl
      Originally Posted by MarkJukov View Post

      Yeah, as long as the 2 moves are spread over the year, there really should be no problem at all.
      You mean as in bowel movement? Makes no sense.

      Somewhere google stated how many they follow in a chain...6 or 7.

      I'm too lazy to look it up, because it's a silly idea.

      301 was never meant for the nonsense that people have made it.

      Paul
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