How do SERP Analysis Tools For SEO and Ranking Perform?

by WarriorForum.com Administrator
6 replies
  • SEO
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A new article on Search Engine Journal says that SEO tools analyse top-ranked sites and provide correlation-based analysis for SEO, but asks how useful the information is.



A relatively new type of tool analyzes the search engine results pages (SERPs) and provides recommendations based on a statistical analysis of similarities shared between the top-ranked sites, but some in the search community have their doubts. This is called Search Engine Results Page (SERP) Correlation Analysis. SERP analysis is research that analyzes Google search results to identify factors in ranked web pages.

However, the SEO community has found interesting correlations in the past by studying search results. One such analysis discovered that top-ranked sites tend to have Facebook pages with a lot of likes, for instance. But did they really rank because of the likes?

The author says no, and adds that just because the top-ranked sites share certain features does not mean that those features caused them to rank better. It's that lack of actual cause between the factors in common and the actual reasons why those sites are top-ranked can be seen as a problem. Just because web pages ranked in the search results share a word count, a keyword density or share keywords doesn't mean that those word counts, keyword densities, and keywords are causing those pages to rank.

Ten Blue Links

An additional problem with analyzing the top ten of the search results is that the search results are no longer just a list of ten ranked web pages. Bill Slawski is from GoFishDigital:

"The data in correlation studies may be cleaned so that One Boxes and Featured Snippets don't appear within them, but it's been a long time since we lived in a world of ten blue links."
#analysis #perform #ranking #seo #serp #tools
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  • Profile picture of the author impvuid
    i have a question and I can't create a thread so I'm here for asking,
    I wanna know the impact of .edu backlinks because education websites has High Moz DA, and Alexa rank If i Got a backlink from their sites then does it valuable for my Google ranking, or it has a negative impact on my website.
    Greenuptown
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  • Profile picture of the author Analytics Online
    Natural Backlinks are better than .gdu or .gov
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    • Profile picture of the author Jefay
      Originally Posted by Analytics Online View Post

      Natural Backlinks are better than .gdu or .gov
      I think so too! I would like to focus on guest posting on some high-rated blogs. I guess it helps a lot. I have just created a cool website for me using the website builder which I found recently, and I am working on SEO for it now. Thank you so much for the thread here! Any further advice will be appreciated
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  • Profile picture of the author savidge4
    Originally Posted by WarriorForum.com View Post

    A new article on Search Engine Journal says that SEO tools analyse top-ranked sites and provide correlation-based analysis for SEO, but asks how useful the information is.



    A relatively new type of tool analyzes the search engine results pages (SERPs) and provides recommendations based on a statistical analysis of similarities shared between the top-ranked sites, but some in the search community have their doubts. This is called Search Engine Results Page (SERP) Correlation Analysis. SERP analysis is research that analyzes Google search results to identify factors in ranked web pages.

    However, the SEO community has found interesting correlations in the past by studying search results. One such analysis discovered that top-ranked sites tend to have Facebook pages with a lot of likes, for instance. But did they really rank because of the likes?

    The author says no, and adds that just because the top-ranked sites share certain features does not mean that those features caused them to rank better. It's that lack of actual cause between the factors in common and the actual reasons why those sites are top-ranked can be seen as a problem. Just because web pages ranked in the search results share a word count, a keyword density or share keywords doesn't mean that those word counts, keyword densities, and keywords are causing those pages to rank.

    Ten Blue Links

    An additional problem with analyzing the top ten of the search results is that the search results are no longer just a list of ten ranked web pages. Bill Slawski is from GoFishDigital:
    I have to disagree with some of this.

    One of the things over my many years of internet development and SEO and CRO etc I have done is analyzed top sites for terms I am working with. Each term is different based apon the pages that rank. And YES, there will be a pattern.

    My theory is that we are dealing with algorithms. So you can be equal to those within the group, you can be less than, and you can be greater than. Algorithms are math so "exceptions" would be easily identifiable.

    If you look at something like a local 3 pack listing and then click the "View All" tab you can start looking at review counts. I generally find the ones listed tend to fall into a "range" and then looking at the "View All" there will be listings that are greater than and less than those that actually make the 3 pack. Geography more than ever is now a variable, but the review count obviously has some play... to few and you wont list, and to many and you wont list.

    The same idea I find is also true with SERP listings. be it word count... to many words, or not enough words, as compared to the top listed sites will take you away from average and into "exception land" as I call it. It is said that 2000 words or greater is the goal... but that is not always the case. Sometimes the average is like 300 words.

    I also find that there is a sweet spot for links. to many or not enough as compared to the ranking average will throw you to pages beyond #1.

    And again... this stuff is determined term by term by term. there is no single answer overall in any of this. do a search for "Dentist" and note the results. Do a search for "Dentist near me" and note the results. Do a search for "Dentist in <insert city>" and note the results. Basically the exact same search, but there can be drastically different results.

    I have said it before, and I will say it again and again and again... in the world of SEO, you want to be average. to much, or to little of ANY variable can be enough to kick you right off of page 1.
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    Success is an ACT not an idea
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  • Profile picture of the author Julia Timpson
    Mangools SERP Checker
    Analyze all the strengths and weaknesses of your competitors.
    Evaluate SERP positions.
    Compare your desktop vs mobile results.
    Detect Google SERP features.
    Choose from countries, states, or cities for Local SERP results.
    Compare your website with competitors.
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    • Profile picture of the author SearchEngineWays
      Originally Posted by Julia Timpson View Post

      Mangools SERP Checker
      Analyze all the strengths and weaknesses of your competitors.
      Evaluate SERP positions.
      Compare your desktop vs mobile results.
      Detect Google SERP features.
      Choose from countries, states, or cities for Local SERP results.
      Compare your website with competitors.
      Any idea about other SERP tools?
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11668635].message }}
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