How to create multi pages sites...

12 replies
  • SEO
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After creating over 100+ websites, I have to say that NONE of my sites are less than 5 pages.

It's very easy to create pages that has more than 5 pages, and you can make it less MFA look.

I don't really like to do this:
1) Research and find top 5 keywords
2) Write 5 articles on each of the keywords
3) Upload all the articles, there's the 5-pages site

The problem with the above is that it's not really useful, and people (perhaps even Google!) knows that you are creating it just for Adsense.

In other words, it just doesn't look natural!


My purpose is to provide really useful information to the readers, in addition to the researched keywords articles that I may add in.

This provides diversity in my sites and increases the usefulness/stickiness, which I think is important to the SEO longevity of the sites.

I know it is important (2 of my sites are ranking very HIGH up in Google for SINGLE keywords!) because people are linking to me AUTOMATICALLY due to the usefulness of my content. I always get new links from various sites because these writers want to link to useful sites. And yes, all my Adsenses blocks are on the upper fold and people are clicking on them... $$$


Here are some of the pages that I usually would write, and how I would write them by myself. Note that not all the pages are written for all my sites, I write them when I find it useful for that niche.

I'll also put in an example keywords, "dog training" in the following to illustrate my point:

1) Page 1: Index page - Write normal article on your main keyword. I'll write a simple overview of "dog training".

2) Page 2: History of [niche] - Simple story writing tracing back to it's creation. That means I'll write on development of dog training since 1980s.

3) Page 3: Advantages of [niche] - 3 advantages of 100+ words each will give you at least 350+ words for the page. For this, obviously, I'll write about the advantages of dog training.

4) Page 4: Disadvantages/Pitfalls of [niche] - Similar to the above. If you cannot find disadvantages (what?!?!), write the possible pitfalls. In dog training, it can be hard to find disadvantages, so I would write pitfalls of dog training.

5) Page 5: How to do [niche]
- Depending on the niche, you would write on "how-to" of your niche. You get a lot of "how-to" materials from WikiHow, HowStuffWorks, etc. There are plenty of "dog training" how-tos for me to write on.

6) Page 6: Why [niche] - Give 3 reasons of 100+ words each and you'll have at least 350+ words also. For dog training, I'll give 3 reasons why I need to train my dog

7) Page 7: Reviews of [niche] - Almost anything can be reviewed, but it would be useful for niches that are product-based. There are many products available for dog training so I'll just review 3 products or books that can help me in training my dogs.

8) Page 8: FAQs of [niche]
- Give about 5-6 questions and answer them in this page. For dog training, it's very easy to find FAQs for me to write on.


There you have, 8 pages full of useful content. Add in the following:
- Sitemap
- Privacy Policy
- Contact Us
- About Us
- Your other keywords articles

and you could even reach over 20 pages.

This is how I would build my sites.

Just remember this motto:

Make your site useful, and your site will reward you.

I believe Google would agree with me.



Let's open for a little discussion, what other pages would you add in, other than the above 8 topics?
#create #multi #pages #sites
  • Profile picture of the author samcarson
    Joseph your content formula is very neat and helpful. I will try to incorporate that in my sites. How about adding a list of useful videos to your list?

    I had one other question not related to this thread, just sent you a PM

    Thanks

    Sam
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  • Profile picture of the author mainstreetcm
    This is what I did for my essentially made for advertising website (adsense may not be the only option I use). I think I am up to 43 pages including links, about us, and privacy policy. Some of the articles don't get read alot, but others get linked to like crazy.

    Really does work and makes me look less like an xfactor site.
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  • Profile picture of the author lilydab
    So is it better to have more pages instead of posts as my thoughts were that google preferred posts ?
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    • Profile picture of the author Joseph Then
      Originally Posted by lilydab View Post

      So is it better to have more pages instead of posts as my thoughts were that google preferred posts ?
      Mine's not Wordpress blogs, but merely static HTML pages so it's a different thing.

      To the clear here, I use XSitePro, and 95% of my sites are running on XSitePro.
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  • Profile picture of the author bgmacaw
    Overall, I think this is a good plan to build out a niche site. There's no huge problem though with blending in additional pages that are long tail keyword targeted as you go. You can be creative with your titles by using ignored (aka stop) words in the title along with the keyword.

    As I mentioned in this thread, good content does improve your chances for getting unsolicited links within a particular niche. In fact, you'll sometimes get these links simply because your site ranks well and, oddly enough, these could even be links from a big time authority site like CNN or such.

    Here's something I've noticed though. Good content, while a good thing to have, is less important than the right look. If you look MFA, meaning you use something like the XFactor site design, the Prosense WP theme and such, you'll probably not get as many unsolicited links and may draw unwanted attention from Google in a visual inspection. However, you can have quite mediocre content with a professional looking magazine style theme and, since you look the part, it's assumed that you're an expert. In some niches, looking like your using FrontPage 1998 to build your sites is a winner while looking like a typical niche marketer gets you nowhere.

    Often, it's not how you feel, it's how you look...


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    • Profile picture of the author Joseph Then
      Originally Posted by bgmacaw View Post

      Overall, I think this is a good plan to build out a niche site. There's no huge problem though with blending in additional pages that are long tail keyword targeted as you go. You can be creative with your titles by using ignored (aka stop) words in the title along with the keyword.

      As I mentioned in this thread, good content does improve your chances for getting unsolicited links within a particular niche. In fact, you'll sometimes get these links simply because your site ranks well and, oddly enough, these could even be links from a big time authority site like CNN or such.

      Here's something I've noticed though. Good content, while a good thing to have, is less important than the right look. If you look MFA, meaning you use something like the XFactor site design, the Prosense WP theme and such, you'll probably not get as many unsolicited links and may draw unwanted attention from Google in a visual inspection. However, you can have quite mediocre content with a professional looking magazine style theme and, since you look the part, it's assumed that you're an expert. In some niches, looking like your using FrontPage 1998 to build your sites is a winner while looking like a typical niche marketer gets you nowhere.

      Often, it's not how you feel, it's how you look...

      YouTube - Billy Crystal - You Look Marvelous (1985)

      That's good point that you have raised. However, I do stand one having good content because that's what Google is looking at. I usually assume that basic, good design is common here.

      In Google's view, the website must provide useful information for the users. That is why I do not prefer websites that are chokeful of keyword-filled articles which Google can tell straight away.

      To illustrate my point, let's say if you have 5 hairloss-related keywords that you want to rank (assume that they are easy to rank, OK?):
      hair treatment
      how to cure hair loss
      how to treat hair problem
      treat hair problem
      cure hair loss

      And you have 5 pages of the following in the menu:
      Hair treatment
      How to cure hair loss
      How to treat hair problem
      Treat hair problem
      Cure hair loss

      Don't you think that the above are repetitive? Look at item 3 and 4, they are talking about the same thing but I see a lot of these in many adsense sites. I don't know about you but Google's manual review team can tell if you are trying provide information, or made for Adsense.


      However, if I have the following menu:
      Hair treatment
      History of hair treatment
      How to cure hair loss
      How to treat hair problem
      Treat hair problem
      Cure hair loss
      Hair Treatment FAQ
      Pitfalls of hair treatment

      The above content/menu will look more useful, isn't it?

      Google wants us to create content for the users, so that's what I will do, and get rewarded (in Adsense) for doing so.
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      • Profile picture of the author bgmacaw
        Originally Posted by Joseph Then View Post

        However, I do stand one having good content because that's what Google is looking at.
        Unfortunately, that's not really what they look at, at least not at the depth you seem to be talking about. They would like for you to believe that their algorithms know all, that their visual inspectors scrutinize each site's pages for quality content. However, that's not the case. It's really all statistics and gut, 30 seconds or less, reactions to a site's appearance.

        Originally Posted by Joseph Then View Post

        I usually assume that basic, good design is common here.
        I'm getting at something deeper here. It's having a site that looks the part, like it belongs in the niche and isn't just someone trying to get Adsense clicks.

        Originally Posted by Joseph Then View Post

        In Google's view, the website must provide useful information for the users.
        That's what they say but isn't really what happens. How much 'useful information' do big time scrapper sites like thefind.com and nextag.com bring to the table?

        Originally Posted by Joseph Then View Post

        I don't know about you but Google's manual review team can tell if you are trying provide information, or made for Adsense.
        The sad fact is that they probably won't even notice the menu text in their 30 second or less visual review of the index page of the site. They will notice though if you look like a typical MFA layout like XFactor or Prosense and, even if you have the best, most useful, content in the world they'll still deindex you.
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        • Profile picture of the author Joseph Then
          Originally Posted by bgmacaw View Post

          That's what they say but isn't really what happens. How much 'useful information' do big time scrapper sites like thefind.com and nextag.com bring to the table?
          The 'usefulness' is that they are able to search. There's more than just 'text' usefulness. Inside the content of scrapper sites are all the related results searched by the user.

          Originally Posted by bgmacaw View Post

          The sad fact is that they probably won't even notice the menu text in their 30 second or less visual review of the index page of the site. They will notice though if you look like a typical MFA layout like XFactor or Prosense and, even if you have the best, most useful, content in the world they'll still deindex you.
          Well, mine's not XFactor nor Prosense sites. My sites are all custom-built from XSitePro.

          If the Google team have 30 seconds to decide, I want to be able to let them know that my website is useful with the content (as seen in the menu links), in addition to the 'good' design.
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